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M. UNIVERSmr W mCHIGAH UBRAJdES 



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rOFMCHIGAHUBRAMES 



RECORDS 


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H.M. KING EDWARD VII., 

Colon E L- 1 N-C H I E F, 

King's Own Roval Rkoiment of Norfolk Impihial Ysomanry. 



I 



r 



\ 



H.M. HAAKON VII., KING OF NORWAY, K.G., G.C.B., G.C.V.O., 

Honorary Colonel, 

King's Own Royal Rbgiment of Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry. 




RECORDS OF THE NORFOLK 

E O M A N R Y 
CAVALRY 



TO WHICH IS ADDED 

THE FENCIBLE AND PROVISIONAL CAVALRY OF 

THE SAME COUNTY 

FROM 1780 TO 1908 

Together with the Account of the ^^rd and 44th Squcuirons of 

Imperial Yeomanry ^ who Volunteered for the 

South African War, 1900 

COMPILED S^ ^ft 

LIEUT..COLONEL J? R^ HARVEY 




LONDON 

JARROLD & SONS, 10 and it, Warwick Lane, E.G. 

Norwich : London and Exchange Streets 

1908 



657.5 

h34 



O^t^oiMM^I^^O 



List of Subscribers. 



HIS MAJESTY KING EDWARD VII. 

H.R.H. George F.E^., Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall and York, 
K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O. 



Albemarle, Earl o£, C.B., M.V.O., V.D., 

Quidenham Hall, Norfolk 
Angell, Lieat.-CoL T. P., V.D., Beccles, 

SufiTolk 
Army and Navy Clab, Pall Mall, London, 

S.W. 

B 

Barclay, Colonel H. A., C.V.O., A.D.C., 

Hanworth Hall, Norfolk 
Barclay, Colonel Hugh G., V.D., Colney 

Hall, Norwich 
Bateman, Dowager Lady, Brome Place, 

Eye, Suffolk 
Bateman, Lord, Shobdon Court, Leominster 
Beauchamp, Sir Reginald, Bart., Langley 

Park, Norfolk 
Beevor,Jolm H., Eccles Hall, Attleborough, 

Norfolk 
Bensly, W. T., LL.D., F.S.A., The Close, 

Norwich 
Bignold, Charles B., The Grange, Eaton, 

Norwich 
Birkbeck, G., 30, Egerton Crescent, London, 

S.W. 
Birkbeck, H., Westacre High House, 

Swaffham, Norfolk 
Birkbeck, Martin, Poringland, Norfolk 
Birkbeck, W. J., Stratton Strawless, Norfolk 
Blake- Humphrey, Lieut.-Col. T., Heggatt 

HaU, Norfolk 
Boileau, Sir Maurice, Bart., Ketteringham 

Hall, Norfolk 



Boyle, Hon. Mrs., Rowden House, Frome, 

Somerset 
Bremmer, Surgn.-Captain J. M. G., M.B., 

18, St. Giles' Street, Norwich 
British Museum Library 
BuUard, Capt. G. T., Alexandra Mansions, 

Norwich 
Bulwer, Gen. Sir Edward E. G., K.C.B., 

The Grange, Heydon, Norwich 
Bulwer, Sir Henry E. G., G.C.M.G., 17a, 

South Audley Street, London 
Bulwer, Gen. W. E. G. L., C.B., Quebec 

House, East Dereham, Norfolk 
Buxton, Sir Fowell, Bart., Colne Cottage, 

Cromer, Norfolk 
Buxton, E. G. , High House, Thorpe, Norfolk 
Buxton, Lieut.-Col. G. F., V.O., Dunston 

HaU, Norwich 
Buxton, Ivor, Dunston Hall, Norwich 



Cator, John, Woodbastwick Hall, Norfolk 
Cavalry Club, 127, Piccadilly, London 
Chamberlin, A. R., Grove House, Norwich 
Chamberlin, Capt. F., Hethersett, Norfolk 
Clark, H. L., Wroxham, Norfolk 
Coke, Col. Viscount, K.C.V.O., C.M.G., 

A.D.C., Holkham, Norfolk 
Colman, R. J., Crown Point, Trowse, 

Norwich 
Colvin, Col. R. B., C.B., Monkham Hall, 

Bishop's Waltham 
Cooper, Lieut. Harvey Spencer, R.N., 

United Service Club, Pall Mall, London 



List of Subscribers. 



Cook, Mrs., Sennowe Park, Ryborgh, 

Norfolk 
Copeman, H. J., iii, Newmarket Road, 

Norwich 
Cross, G., Postwick Hall, Norwich 
Cruicksbank, Colonel F. H. G., SpriDgfield 

Lyons, Chelmsford, Essex 
Cubitt, Major F. A., V.D., Thorpe Old Hall, 

Norwich 
Cullum, Gen. J. S. A., 4, Sterling St, Mont- 

pelier Sq., London 
Cullum, G. Milner-Gibson, F.S.A. 

D 
Davey, T. R., Leigh House, Bristol 



Elrington, Mrs., Vernon House, Bishop's 
Waltham 



Fellowes, Hon. AUwjni, Honingham Hall, 

Norfolk 
Ferrier, R. F. E., Hemsby Lodge, Great 

Yarmouth 
ffolkes, Rev. F., Wolverton Rectory, Norfolk 
ffolkes. Sir W., Bart., Hillington Hall, 

Norfolk 
Ficklin, P. Bemey, Tasburgh Hall, Norfolk 
Fisher, F. O., 28, Charles Road, St. 

Leonards-on-Sea 
Free Library, Norwich 
Frere, John Tudor, The Friarage, Diss, 

Norfolk 

G 

Gee, W. C, Holm Cottage, Bacton, Norfolk 

Gilbert, Mrs., Aylsham, Norfolk 

Gilbert, Lieut.-Col. H. H., Branksome, 

Lyndhurst Road, Lowestoft 
Gilman, Sir Charles, Stafford House, Eaton, 

Norwich 
Greene, Lieut.-Col. Raymond, 1x3, Mount 

Street, London 
Grosvenor Library, 85, Chapel Street, 

Belgrave Square, London 
Guinness, Major Hon. W. xi, Grosvenor 

Place, London 
Gumey, Reginald, Earlham Hall, Norwich 



Gumey, J. H., Keswick Hall, Norwich 
Gumey, Q., Northrepps Hall, Norfolk 

H 

Haldinstein, H. W., Thorpe Lodge, Norwich 
Bateman-Hanbury, Capt. Hon. Charles, 

Breckies Old Hall, Attleboro*, Norfolk 
Harbord, Col. Hon. Charles, Gunton Park, 

Norfolk 
Hamer, F. W., Cringleford, Norwich 
Harper, Mrs., 8, Brunswick Terrace, 

Brighton 
Harvey, Mrs., Lansdown House, Taplow, 

Bucks. 
Harvey, Colonel Sir Charles, Bart., Rain- 

thorpe Hall, Norfolk 
Harvey, Mrs., Holmwood, Thorpe, Norwich 
Harvey, Col. C. L., Hazledene, Exmouth, 

Devon 
Hemsworth, A. N. C, Shropham Hall, 

Thetford, Norfolk 
Herring, Capt. H. Le Strange, The Old 

Rectory, Thorpe, Norwich 
Hoare, Sir Samuel, Bart., Sidestrand Hall, 

Cromer, Norfolk 
Hoare, V. R., 37, Fleet Street, London 
Holmes, John, Brooke Hall, Norfolk 
Homor, Francis, The Lawns, Thorpe 

Hamlet, Norwich 
Howell, Miss Hinds, The Close, Norwich 
Hunt, W., 14, Orford Place, Norwich 



I 

Iveagh, Viscount, K.P., 
Thetford, Norfolk 



Elvedon Hall, 



J 
Jary, Major H., South Walsham Hall, 
Norfolk 



Keppel, Capt. B., Lezham Hall, Norfolk 
Keppel, T , Scole House, Diss, Norfolk 
Kerrison, Lieut.-Col. £., C.M.G., Burgh 

Hall, Aylsham, Norfolk 
Kidman, S. H., Horning Hall, Norfolk 
Kimberley, Earl of, Witton Park, Norfolk 



List of Subscribers. 



Lacon, Capt Sir E. B. F. H., Bart., Cavalry 

Club, Piccadilly, London 
Lacon, Mrs. Sidney, Ormesby House, Great 

Yarmouth 
Leicester, Earl of, K.G., Holkham, Norfolk 
Leslie, Mrs., Overton Meads, Eastbourne 
Le Strange, Hamon, F.S.A., Hunstanton 

Hall, Norfolk 
Low, F., 12, St. Giles' Street, Norwich 
Lucas, CoL A. G., C.B., M.V.O., Cliffside, 

Lowestoft 
Library, Prince Consort's, Aldersbot 

M 

Mackenjde, Col. E. P., Downham Hall, 

Norfolk 
Malabide, Lady Talbot de, Malahide Castle, 

CO. Dublin 
Mann, Sir E., Bart., Thelveton Hall, Diss, 

Norfolk 
Mott, J. Stanley, 4, Curzon Street, Mayfair, 

London 

N 

Naval and Military Club, Piccadilly, London 
Nightingale, Mrs., Scratby Hall, Great 

Yarmouth 
Noel, Admiral G. H., Fincham, Downham, 

Norfolk 
Norfolk. Duke of, K.G., G.C.V.O., V.D., 

Arundel Castle, Sussex 
Norfolk County Club 
Norfolk and Norwich Library 
Nugent, Sir Edmund, Bart., West Harling 

HaU, Norfolk 

O 

Officer's Mess, King's Own Norfolk 
Yeomanry 



Parsons, F. W., Down House, Sidcup, 

Kent 
Patteson, CoL H. E., V.D., Beeston Hall, 

Norfolk 
Pattin, Dr. H. C. Cooper, King Street 

House, Norwich 



Paul, Dawson, Eaton Grove, Norwich 
Pemberton, Colonel E. S. C, The Albany, 

Piccadilly, London 
Petre, Mrs., Furre Hill, N. Walsham, 

Norfolk 
Philo, J., Tombland, Norwich 
Flatten, G., Conway Lodge, Hunstanton, 

Norfolk 
Poock, Lieut. -Col. J., M.V.O., V.D., Erping- 

ham House, Tombland, Norwich 
Preston, T. F., Admiralty M.D., 18, Victoria 

Street, Westminster, London, S.W. 
Purdy, H. W., Aylsham, Norfolk 
Prior, Lieut.-Col. Leathes, Thorpe St. 

Andrew, Norwich 



Ranking, Harvey, 13, Westboume Terrace, 
Hyde Park, London 

Ravenhill, Mrs., Park House, Brentwood, 
Essex 

Reeve, Mrs., Ber House, Norwich 

Royal United Service Institution, White- 
hall, London 

Rye, Walter, a8, Surrey Street, Norwich 



Showell, H., Stourton Hall, Stourbridge, 

Staffs. 
Singh, H.H. Prince Frederick Duleep, 

M.V.O., Breckles, Attleboro', Norfolk 
Sondes, Lord, Nash Court, Faversham, 

Kent 
Southwell, T., 10, The Crescent, Chapel 

Field Road, Norwich 
Spelman, W. W. R., 77, Newmarket Road, 

Norwich 
Spurrell, Major R., Glandyfi Castle, 

Cardiganshire 
Stacy, Surgn.-Lieut.-Col. J. H., 30, St 

Giles* Street, Norwich 
Stafford Lord, Costessey Park, Norwich 
Steward, Major J. H., East Carleton Manor 

Norfolk. 
Stuart, Mrs., Carrow Abbey, Norwich 
Saffield, Lord, G.C.V.O., K.C.B., V.D , 

Cromer, Norfolk 



List of Subscribers. 



Taylor, Major A. H., V.D., Plomishall 

Lodge, Cotman Road, Norwich 
Tack, G. Hostler, 30, Bracondale, Norwich 

U 

United Service Club, Pall Mall, London 
Utting, Stephen W., Stanley Avenue, 
Thorpe, Norwich 



Vincent, William, New Hall, Whinburgh, 
East Dereham 



W 
Walslngham, Lord, F.R.S., Merton Hall, 

Thetford, Norfolk 
Walter, J., Drayton, Norfolk 
War OfiBce Library, Whitehall, London 
Ward, R., Salhouse HaU, Norfolk 
Wilson, Sir Frederick, The Dale, Seaming, 

East Dereham, Norfolk 
Wodehouse, Colonel A., 4, Wingfield Villas, 

Devonport 
Wood, John HiU, Oakley Park, Eye, 

Suffolk 
Wood, C. G., Dillington HaU, East 

Dereham, Norfolk 

Y 
Yarmouth Free Library 



TO 

SIR WILLIAM HOVELL BROWNE FFOLKES, Baronet. 

OF HILLINGTON HALL, NORFOLK, 
THIS BOOK IS 

(without permission) 

MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 

as an appreciation of the many acts of kind assistance he has shown to 
the Compiler of this work, and as a token of respect to the representative 
of one of our old Norfolk families, for whom every Norfolk man entertains 
the highest esteem and regard, 

BY HIS MOST OBEDIENT 
AND FAITHFUL SERVANT, 

THE AUTHOR. 



List of the Books used in compiling 

these Records. 

" A History of the British Army," by the Hon. J. W, Fortescue. 

" History of the British Army," by J. H. Stocquelar. 

" History of our Reserve Forces," by a Militia Officer. 

" Records of the Light Horse Volunteers," by Collyer & Pocock. 

" History of Norfolk," by Mason. 

" Palgrave Family Memorials," by Palmer & Tucker. 

" Norfolk and Norwich Notes and Queries," Norfolk Chronicle, 

" Norfolk Annals," by Charles Mackie. 

" Perlustration of Great Yarmouth," by C. J. Palmer. 

" Hundreds of Bradenham and Launditch,*' by Carthew. 

"Defence of the County of Norfolk," by General Money. 

**My Youth and My Life," by Charles Loftus. 

*'£a5t Anglian Handbook— 1866 to 1890" 

Norfolk Chronicle. 

Norwich Mercury. 

" Coke of Norfolk and His Friends," by Stirling. 



Norfolk Yeomanty. 



Raised about 1782. 

Disbanded 1793. 
Re-raised 1794. 

Disbanded 1802. 
Re-raised 1803. 

Disbanded 1828. 
Re-raised 1831. 

Disbanded 1849. 
Re-raised as Mounted Rifles i860. 

Disbanded 1867. 
Merged into Suffolk Yeomanry circa 1872. 
Re-raised as Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry 1901. 



Contents. 



CHAPTER 1. 



fAam 



1780 to 1793 — Hiftorical events leading np to the fonnation of Anned Anodations in 

Norfolk— Correspondence between Lord Townshend and Sir Martin Folkes 
concerning the Incorporation of the Norfolk Rangers — Affray with Smugglers 
in 1784-— Riot at Varmouth, 179a — Rangers^ Ball at Rainham, 1793 — •*• ^7 

CHAPTER n. 

1794 to i&oo— Fendble and Provisioiial Cavalr y Co nes pon dcn ce re Norfolk Rangers — 

Court- Martial on Lieut. Alexander » of Norfolk Fencible Cavaliy->-Tcaining and 
Equipment of Yeomanry, 1796 — Raising of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers by 
John Harvey, 1798 — Return of Troopa from Walcheren Expedition and 
Reception at Norwich, i799~Dbbandment of Fencible Cavalry at Dereham, 
1800 -Norfolk Smugglers, 1801 — Disbandment of Yeomanry and thanks of 
Parliament to them, 1802 ... •- ... ... ... 35 

CHAPTER HL 

1803 to 1804 — Renewed Hostilities with Fraaoe-— Yeomanry Reorganization — Reminis- 
cences of Pepper Manby — ^Yeomanry perform Garrison Duty at Yarmouth — 
Inspections, Drills, and State of Yeomanry in 1803 — Resolutions of the Norwich 
Light Horse — ^Yeomanry formed into Regiments — False Alarm of Invasion at 
Weyboume — Inspections and Presentation of Colours to Yeomanry Corps — 
General Money's Address in 1804 ... ... ... ... 118 

CHAPTER IV. 

1805 to 181 5 — Circular Letter to Yeomanry Corps from the Assistant Adjutant-General 

— Condition of Yeomanry in 1805 — ^Telegraph between Yarmouth, Norwich, 
and London, 1807 — Presentation to Captain Darell, 1808 — Yeomanry Stag 
Hunt, i8o9~Peace Rejoicings, 181 3— Yeomanry Escapades, 1813 — Riot at 
King's Lynn, 1814 — Norwich Riot, 181 5 — Lord Sidmouth's Letter to 
Yeomanry Commanding Officers, 1815 ... ... ... ... 165 

CHAPTER V. 

1816 to 1829— Riots in Norfolk and Norwich, i8i6*-Machme Breaking in Norfolk, 

1822 — Recollections of Charles Loftus, 1822 — Presentation of Sword to Colonel 
Harvey — ^Weavers' Riots at Norwich, 1826-27 — Disbandment of Yeomanry, 1827 196 

CHAPTER VI. 

1830 to 1838 — Riots among Labourers in Norfolk — Reminiscences of 1831 of Charles 

Loftus — Re-raising of the Norfolk Yeomanry under Hon. Milles — ^Training of the 
Yeomanry at Yarmouth — ^Training of the Yeomanry at Lynn — Riot at Bircham, 
1835 — Yeomanry Summoned to Cromer, 1836 — Resignation of Lord Sondes, 1838 246 



Contents. 



CHAPTER VII. 



rAGB 



i8j8 to i849^Mftjor Loftns Assumes Commaiid vice Lord Sondes — ^Training at Dereham, 

1838 — Presentation of Standard to Hingham Troop— Training at Holt~ 
Training at Cromer, 1840— Presentation to Major Loftns, 1840— Trainings 
at Yarmouth, Swaffham, Fakenham — Presentation of Standard by the Lord- 
Lieatenant— Training at Holt, 1844 ; Dereham, 1845 » Cromer, 1846 ; Wells, 
1847 — DiBbandment of the Yeomanry, 1849... ... ... ... 271 

CHAPTER VIII. 

i860 to 1867 — Mounted Volunteers in Norwich, i860 — Oiganixation of the Mounted 

Rifle Corps by Mr. Hay Gumey — Parliamentary Inquiry into Condition of 
Yeomanry in 1861 — Norfolk Light Horse Ball — Marriage of the Prince ot 
Wales— Grand Review on Mousehold, 1863 — Her Majesty's Birthday, 186$ — 
Visit of Prince of Wales to Norwich, 1866 — Testimonial to Mr. Hay Gumey — 
Norfolk Light Horse Disbanded, 1867 ... ... ... ... 307 

CHAPTER IX. 

1874 to 1899— Loyal Suffolk Hussars : Norfolk finds Officers for this Corps from 1877 

to 1900 — Parliamentary Return on Yeomanry, 1875 — ^Parliamentary Return on 
Yeomanry, 1892— Suffolk Yeomanry Train at Yarmouth, 1896— Suffolk 
Yeomanry Train at Norwich, 1899 ... ... ... ..* 325 

CHAPTER X. 

1899 to 1901— The Raising of the 43rd and 44th Squadrons of Imperial Yeomanry 

by the Suffolk Hussars at Norwich, 1899— Departure for South Afirica, 1900— 
The 43rd and 44th in South Afirica— Arrival Home at Bury and Norwich 1901 ... 334 

CHAPTER XI. 

1901 to 1908— The Raisittg of the King's Own Royal R^iiment ot Norfolk Imperial 

Yeomanry, 1901, up to its Absorption into the Territorial Cavalry, 1908 ... 365 

APPENDIX. 
Biographical Notes ... ... ... ... ... ... 39' 



Preface, 

Although this cannot by any means claim to be a complete record of 
the doings of our local cavalry in the stirring times when George the 
Third was King, and during the reign of successive sovereigns, enough will, 
I hope, be said to show that our ancestors in Norfolk were not in any 
way deficient in courage or patriotism, but were well to the fore by land 
and sea. 

In the splendid traditions of the commencement of the nineteenth 
century, our citizen soldiers of the present century have an excellent example, 
and there is little doubt that should similar need arise, similar courage 
and devotion to our country will not be found wanting. 

I would wish my readers to clearly understand that I do not claim 
for this work any literary merit, as it mainly consists of dry facts culled 
from the files of old county newspapers, interspersed with various historical 
notes, which I considered necessary to illustrate the growth and the cause 
of maintenance of these local mounted forces. Nevertheless, it contains so 
many names, even now well-known in Norfolk, that they may perhaps 
prove interesting to their descendants. 

It only remains for me, in conclusion, to express my regret for the 
short-comings of this book, which I know does not deal adequately with 
many points of interest; but the sources of information are very meagre, 
and very little has been handed down to us of the actual doings of our 
county cavalry. This, perhaps, is due to the fact that they were chiefly engaged 
in monotonous duties of drill and exercise, varied with occasional calls in 
aid of the civil power; but still the fact remains that our county family 
muniment rooms contain very little appertaining to the origin and history 
of the force. 

I have met with the greatest kindness and help from many in the 
county. I would especially thank Sir William flblkes, who placed at my 
disposal from his muniment room, all his letters relating to the early history 
of the Norfolk Rangers, and also presented me with a coloured platci 
the original of which hangs in his ancestral hall at Hillington. I am 
deeply indebted to him for his unfailing kindness and courtesy. My 
warmest thanks are also due to Lady Leicester and Lady Bateman for 



Preface. 



also giving^ coloured plates to my book ; the one the representation of the 
Holkham standard, and the latter the portrait of General Sir Edward 
Kerrison. I owe to both these noble ladies a debt of gratitude for the 
interest they have taken in my humble efforts, which I can never repay. 

My thanks are also due to Colonel Geoffrey Buxton of Dunston, and 
Mr. Reginald Gurney of Earlham, for their generosity in giving coloured 
plates to my work, and for their encouragement and help at the commence* 
ment of my labours. 

I also wish to convey my warmest thanks to Colonel H. A. Barclay, 
C.V.O., A.D.C., commanding the King's Own Royal Regiment Norfolk 
Imperial Yeomanry, for his courtesy in placing at my disposal the Regimental 
Record Book, without which it would have been impossible for me to write 
the history of the Regiment up to 1908 with any degree of accuracy. 

I have made use of the Norwich Free Library and experienced the 
greatest attention from Mr. J. G Tennant, the Librarian there: In my 
searches at the War Office, I received very great help from Mr. Bertram 
Cubitt, who was instrumental in placing the Library there at my disposal, 
and the advice of the Librarian there was most valuable. 

I have taken the newspaper extracts from old files of the Norwich 
Mercury and the Norfolk Chronicle^ and I offer my best thanks to the 
proprietors of these journals for the facility they have afforded me in 
searching. To Mr. Walter Rye my thanks are due for his advice and 
sympathy in my undertaking. To Mr. Wells, of St. Andrew's Broad Street, 
Norwich, I have also to express my thanks for the loan of two helmets, 
sketches of which appear in these pages. Last, but by no means least, 
I must not omit to thank Mr. Frederic Johnson, of 8, Theatre Street, 
Norwich, for his sound advice and practical help throughout my labours. 

That these records might have been better written I well know, but 
dealing as they do with plain facts and not fiction, I found my task a 
difficult one, but should it prove of interest to my fellow-citizens of Norfolk 
and Norwich, who are interested in the history of our county, I shall feel 
that my labours of the past three years have not been in vain. 

holmwood, 
Thorpe, Norwich. 

3 1 J/ November^ 1908. 



List of Illustrations. 



H.M. KING EDWARD VII. - - - MnHsfnea 

H.M. HAAKON VII., KING OF NORWAY, K.G., 

G.C.B., G.C.V.O. - - - - - „ 

to face page 

George, Marquess Townshend - - - - - 20 

Sir Martin Browne Polices, Bart. . . - . 26 

Parchment Commission of Sir Martin Browne Folkes, Bart., as a 
Captain Lieutenant in the Norfolk Rangers Yeomanry Cavalry, 
dated 10th January, 1783 - - - - 30 

Lieut. -Colonel Hon. William Assheton Harbord - - 38 

Standard of the Blofield and South Walsham Troop of Norfolk 

Yeomanry Cavalry, 1795 - - - - - 66 

Parchment Commission of John Harvey, as a Captain in the Norwich 

Light Horse Volunteers, dated 15th June, 1797 - - 88 

Standard of the Yarmouth Volunteer Cavalry, 1798 - - 96 

Standard of the Holkham Yeomanry Cavalry, 1798 - - 96 

Lieutenant William Palgrave - - . . . ioq 

Captain John Harvey - - - - - 126 

Parchment Commission of Sir Martin Browne Folkes, Bart, as a 
Major in the First Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, 
dated 1805 - - - - - - 168 

George John, Fourth Baron Sondes ... 256 



List of Illustratums. 



U fact pagt 

General Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart, K.C.B., M.P. • - 268 

Major Charles Loftus ..... 274 

Yeomanry Relics ..... 296 

Lieut-Colonel F. Hay Gumey - - - • 310 

Norfolk Light Horse Volunteers, 1867 - - * - 322 

The Centenary of the Duke of York's Own Loyal Suffolk Hussars, 

at Bury St Edmund's, 1893 - * - * 3^6 

Colonel A. G. Lucas, C.B., M.V.O. - - - - 332 

Officers of the 43rd Squadron Imperial Yeomanry, 1900 • 338 

Officers of the 44th Squadron Imperial Yeomanry, 1900 - - 342 

43rd Squadron Imperial Yeomanry, on Mousehold, 1900 - 346 

First parade of the Kingfs Own Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry, 1901 - 368 

Officers of the (King's Own) Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry, 1903 - 376 

Lieut-Col. G. F. Buxton, V.D. - - - - 384 

Colonel H. A. Barclay, C.V.O., A.D.C - - - 384 

The King's Own Royal Regiment (Norfolk Yeomanry) • • 388 

Colonel H. A. Barclay, C.V.O., A.D.C. ... 390 



CHAPTER I. 

1780 to 1793. 

Historical events leading up to the formalion of Armed Associations in 
Norfolk — Correspondence between Lord Townshend and Sir Martin 
Folkes concerning the Incorporation of the Norfolk Rangers — Affray 
with Smugglers in 1784 — Riot at Yarmouth^ 1792 — Rangers' Ball at 
Rainham^ 1793- 

The History of the commencement of the Yeomanry Cavalry movement, 
which in the course of over 120 years has resulted in the formation of corps 
of well-trained and well-equipped citizen soldiers all over Great Britain, is 
a matter of history. With the exception of a few scattered efforts, it was 
not until 1782, that volunteer organization became an integral part in the 
national defence. In the often-quoted Evelyn's Diary, August 25th, 1660, I 
find : " Col. Spencer, colonel of a regiment of horse in our county of Kent, 
sent to me and entreated that I would take a commission for a troope 
of horse, and that I would nominate my lieutenant and ensigns. I 
thanked him for the trouble intended me, but would by no means 
undertake the trouble." Again in 1745, Lord Hobart, of Blickling, writes 
strongly as to the defenceless state of the Norfolk coast, but there is no 
suggestion of any cavalry. 

The Army Book of the British Empire states that the Yeomanry was 
first enrolled by Lord Chatham in 1761 ; but this force does not seem at 
that time to have taken any permanent shape in Norfolk. 

A threatened invasion of Ireland by France and Spain was the cause 
of the general awakening of a patriotic spirit, and the close of the eighteenth 
and the early part of the nineteenth century saw in Great Britain a complete 
development of the national instinct of self-defence, when the aggressive 
wars of France, following on the Revolution of 1789, threatened the safety 
of the United Kingdom. 

There are, perhaps, few epochs in which the page of our history is 
crowded with so fearful a list of the greatest causes for public anxiety and 
alarm. The unnatural and disastrous struggle in which we had been so 

B 



1 8 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1780. 



long engaged with our North American colonies had reached that point at 
which all hopes of a successful or satisfactory termination on our part had 
been extinguished. The war continued to rage with all the animosity of 
civil strife ; and although thirteen provinces had been virtually dismembered 
from the mother country, yet the long line of their coast and the frontier 
of the loyal provinces were the scenes still of sanguinary and doubtful 
conflicts. These extended and distant operations necessarily occasioned a 
continual drain upon the naval and military resources of the country, and 
compelled the Government to leave our dependencies nearer home, as well 
as our own shores, without their ordinary protection ; while the exhausted 
state of our finances, and the depressed condition of all commercial and 
manufacturing enterprise, increased to an alarming extent the difficulty of 
supplying the means of providing for these exigencies. This difficulty was 
also aggravated by the existence of an acrimonious spirit of party, and by 
the political dissensions which pervaded every part of England These causes 
of weakness were but too well known to our hostile neighbours on the 
Continent, who had been for some years covertly, and latterly openly, 
co-operating with our rebellious colonists in America; and our supposed 
defenceless condition encouraged the Court of France to organize a European 
confederacy against us, in which she was joined by Spain, who proceeded 
to an open declaration of war, and by our ancient allies in Holland, who, 
less avowedly, were parties to the league. The leading object of this 
confederacy was nothing less than an immediate and formidable invasion 
of England, and for this purpose immense preparations were made on 
various points of the opposite coast of France: the fortress of Gibraltar 
was invested (1779) by land and sea, and in the course of the autumn a 
combined fleet, of more than sixty sail of the line, gained undisputed 
possession of the British Channel and for some time insulted our shores 
in the immediate vicinity of Plymouth with impunity. An attitude so 
formidable and menacing on the part of our enemies could not fail to call 
forth a spirit of defiance and consequent preparation from the loyal and 
patriotic people of England, and in these demonstrations the people of 
Norfolk were not behind their neighbours. 

Public meetings were called in the various country districts, at which 
extensive subscriptions were entered into, for the general support of the 
Government ; and great numbers of the younger men enrolled themselves 
to serve in armed associations. We hear of these societies being formed 
at Yarmouth, Lynn, Holt, and other places in 1780, but little apparently 
was done, beyond enrolling themselves to serve in these armed associations, 
in aid of the regular and constitutional forces of the country. 

Norfolk, during these troublous times, as a maritime county, with a 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1780. 19 

long stretch of coast line, was peculiarly liable to an attack from the foe 
across the Channel, and the old couplet — 

"He who would old England wui, 
Must at Weyboume Hoop begin," 

must often have crossed the minds of our ancestors in the county of Norfolk 
while the Napoleonic scare was spreading through England. 

There is no part of the history of our county more interesting, or more 
abounding in evidence of its patriotism, than that which concerns its efforts 
in time of danger from foreign foes to maintain its independence and 
secure its safety. 

In the past it largely contributed its wealth to the support of the 
nation's burdens, both in times of internal and external troubles ; and now 
we are entering on an epoch when, with its extensive line of coast, it was 
especially exposed to risks of spoliation and disaster which the inhabitants 
of most counties of England were free from. It had to witness many 
an act of piracy along its shores, whilst its merchants were often plundered 
by privateers, and the inhabitants of its villages kept in constant alarm 
during a whole generation by apprehensions of invasion. It had to secure 
the town of Yarmouth from surprise, and, as we shall see, to secure such 
points as Acle bridge and Haddiscoe, as the main obstacles in the path 
of an invader, should he succeed in breaking through the first line of 
defence. It had to keep a watchful eye on Weybourne Hoop, and all 
this mainly . by the forces raised within the county, with comparatively 
trifling help from the Government And it was equal to the emergency. 
The Norfolk Militia was well trained, disciplined, and energetically loyal. 
Its supplementary or volunteer force was strong, and the cordial response 
that was given to every appeal to its patriotism during a quarter of a 
century of national anxiety was proof of the attachment of the people to 
its constitution and liberties. We of this generation, who have inherited 
that constitution and those liberties, owe to their memory the esteem, 
admiration, and gratitude due to their devotion. 



1781. 

As the eighteenth century was drawing to its close, war was raging in 
almost every part of the world. The actions so valiantly fought in the 
Channel by Keppel had not prevented Spain joining with France, and 
the combined fleets of our enemies numbered nearly twice as many as our 
own. Fifty thousand men were gathered on the coasts of France. Paul 



20 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1781. 



Jones was inflicting disaster on our Baltic fleet; and further from home 
English possessions were almost everywhere attacked, and our American 
troubles were at a head. At such a time, in many places, thought was 
given to the desirability of oi^anizing efficient aid to the regular forces of 
the Kingdom, and in some places in Norfolk a very general feeling prevailed 
in favour of volunteer bands for the defence of the coast towns and the 
parts adjoining, and this in anticipation of the Volunteer Associations which 
the Government subsequently regarded as so important a branch of service 
for internal security. 

There is no doubt that a warlike spirit pervaded England in the year 
1 78 1. Not only Parliament, but every public assembly in the country, 
recognised the necessity of adopting measures to meet the threatened 
invasion, and to protect the hearths and homes of the people. Volunteer 
companies were raised throughout the land, under the name of armed 
associations, and martial ardour inflamed the breasts of loyal citizens. 

But there were few armed associations in the county of Norfolk that 
arrived at that eminence in the public estimation that the corps of Norfolk 
Rangers attained under the encouraging patronage of the Marquis 
Townshend of Raynham. I think we may reasonably assume that the Norfolk 
Rangers were first fairly established in this year, although they may have 
been in some sort of existence some years previously. At any rate the 
officers whom we find mentioned during the following ten years certainly 
retained their positions as late as 1803. 

In the first instance they were undoubtedly composed of the tenants 
and yeomanry of the Raynham estate, and at a later period of their 
history they were evidently recruited farther afield, and then became the 
Yeomanry cavalry of the Western part of Norfolk. 



1782. 
I here insert a letter from the muniment room at Hillington, placed at 
my disposal by Sir William ffolkes, Bart. 

Hanover Square. 

March 25th 1782. 
Dear Sir, 

I am very happy to hear your Assizes went off so much to your 

satisfaction. We are in a strange uncertain miserable situation here. The 

Morning Chronicle will pretty nearly give a true description of ye whole 

affair. I yet can only account (ov an arrangement in embrio when I hear 

ye King saw Mr. Pitt Jenkinson Ld. Advocate and Chancelleur at one 



GEORGE MARQUESS TOWNSHEND, 
Commanded Norfolk Rangers Yeomanry Cavalrv 

FROM 1781 TO 1807. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1782. 21 



in ye morning before he set out for Windsor for two days, and ye 
acquiscence of Mr. Pitt in the House of Commons. 

Certain it is that ye Sailors are all in mutiny and scarce one ship 
will sail — ^several regiments ye same at home and abroad — ^some domestic 
riots in which ye Staffordshire Militia have behaved nobly — no trade — no 
regulations — no money in the Treasury. The Highlanders being starving 
have entered sword in hand for subsistence and the Dutch have declared 
they will not make peace without a compensation for ye losses of ye war. 

So much for disarmament whilst Treatise were unconclusive. Thanks 
to Lord Shelboume for that surely ye French who are not disarmed will 
support them. 

I hear our Arms are going on — and the Ordance will give us Carabines 
— they may be necessary bye and bye in ye temper of ye times. 

I am sorry ye reduction of ye Army deprives us of Col. Gwynes men 
but I will call the best of my Regiment who are coining Southwards and 
I hope we shall make some progress with our horse especially. 

What do you think of a Rangers Club once a week or fortnight at 
Fakenham, and to invite Southwards people to meet us — our best com- 
pliments to Lady Folkes and assure her from me that the Ladies of 
fashion are now wearing collars about their necks with their husbands 
names and places of abode. 

yours faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 



At the time when the above letter was written (the early part of 
1782), the calamitous warfare in which we were engaged with the revolted 
provinces of America, supported by the disciplined armies and the skilful 
leaders of the French, still continued to produce no result but numerous 
and sanguinary engagements with varying success. At the same time the 
very existence of our most valuable possessions, both in the East and 
West Indies, was placed in the most imminent peril by the superior 
forces which the combined Continental Powers were enabled to bring 
against them; and although the immediate danger in these quarters 
was in some measure arrested by the brilliant victory of our fleet under 
Rodney, in the West, and our army under Sir Eyre Coote, in the East — 
our naval and military resources were found wholly inadequate to meet 
the drain upon them, required by so many and such distant points of 
attack, as well as to supply a corresponding degree of preparation to 
meet the menacing attitude assumed by the fleets of Spain and France 
against our European dependencies and even our own shores. 

In this exigency it was deemed necessary by our Government that 



J 



22 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1782. 



extraordinary measures should be resorted to, for the increase of our 
defensive force, and with that view a circular letter was addressed by 
the Earl of Shelbourne, on the 7th of May, 1782, to the Mayors of the 
cities and towns in the Kingdom, suggesting a large augmentation to 
the domestic force of the realm, by forming one, or more, volunteer 
corps in each large town, and companies in the smaller, upon a plan 
suggested by the Government 

In response to this circular letter, we find the following announcement 
in the Norwich Mercury of May i8th, 1782 : — 

''We hear that, some young gentlemen of spirit and prosperity in 
this city, intend to form associations with a view to raise volunteer 
companies of independent men, who are interested in the protection and 
the security of the Kingdom, and the preservation of our most excellent 
constitution." 

Again, in the Norwich Mercury of September 14th, 1782, we read : — 

"On Saturday se' night, the Right Hon. Lord Viscount Townshend 
and his Lady arrived at their family seat at Raynham ; and on the 
Sunday morning, a very respectable body of gentlemen, farmers, and 
tradesmen, waited on his Lordship as volunteers to serve in a corps 
(styled the Norfolk Rangers) in order to protect the county of Norfolk 
from any insults from the enemy. The foot being upwards of fifty, 
were cloathed in a genteel green uniform, with black caps and green 
feathers, at his Lordship's expense; the Horse being more numerous, 
and consisting of many persons of fortune, will provide themselves a 
like uniform. The whole corps proceeded with his Lordship to church, 
and after divine service proceeded to the Hall, where they were most 
elegantly entertained by his Lordship; whose polite behaviour gave 
every one present the utmost satisfaction. After harvest, they are to be 
exercised at convenient places for the corps, which it is expected will 
be more numerous, as there appears to be a spirit of emulation per- 
vading through the whole neighbourhood, striving to exert itself in the 
most patriotic and noble cause of defence, for the welfare and peace of 
the county." 

A song was sung on the occasion with the refrain : — 

" Gird on your swords, 
And pass year words, 

To combat toils and dangers; 
When foes assail 
/ We'll turn not taU, 

But join the Norfolk Rangers. 



II 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1782. 23 



It appears from this, that the Rangers did not at this period consist 
exclusively of mounted men. In the paper of the same date, it is stated 
" that Lord Orford is going to raise a mixt corps of horse and foot upon 
the same plan as Lord Townshend, and that other Gentlemen have it also 
in view." 

A week afterwards, the Norwich Mercury announces : — 

V 

" Lord Townshend's corps of volunteers have already increased in 
number to 150; Lord Orford's consists of 100, and Sir Edward Astle/s of 
50, who are to be cloathed, armed, and disciplined, for the defence of the 
Norfolk coast Lord Townshend's uniform is green, faced with black, and 
Sir Edward Astle/s is green and orange ; Lord Orford's is not yet fixed. 
We are happy to find a spirit of emulation prevailing among our young 
nobility and gentry, for the honour and interests of their country, &c" — 
" Lord Townshend, Lord Orford, and Sir Edward Astley, have set a laudable 
example for the defence of this particular part of the kingdom ; and the 
Hon. John Townshend, second son of the above nobleman, is not more 
conspicuous for his talents in the senate, than for his ardour to retrieve 
the glory of this country, and snatch the laurels from her insulting foes, as 
he is already embarked with some of his relations, and other young men of 
family, who are going with the grand fleet to the relief of Gibraltar." 

In a file of the same journal for September 21st, it says : — 

" Lady Townshend has the happy art of uniting public virtue to the 
lustre of her example in private and domestic life ; as we hear that a 
considerable body of horse, to be composed entirely of gentlemen, are 
forming under the immediate patronage of her Ladyship, who are to find 
their own horses, arms, etc, for the defence of this county; and that from 
the spirit already manifested in the neighbourhood, to join so respectable 
a corps, there is every reason to believe it will soon be compleated 

''On Sunday last the Melton Volunteers had their first meeting at 
Melton Hall. About half-past eleven o'clock, the drum beat to arms. Sir 
Edward Astley, Bart, with the officers of the corps, having drawn out the 
men in the park behind the house ; above 1 50 appeared, several of whom 
notwithstanding the shortness of time, were dressed in the uniform, green 
and orange colour. Upwards of 50 respectable farmers in the neighbourhood 
who agreed to cloath themselves, and provide the necessary accoutrements, 
marched to church, Capt Sir Edward Astley at their head. The other 
men in two divisions followed headed by the different officers of the corps. 
A most excellent sermon was preached on the occasion by the Rev. Mr. 



24 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1782. 



Reppes Browne, Chaplain to the corps. After divine service, the men 
inarched back in the same order to Melton Hall, where, having heard read 
to them Sir Edward Astley's commission, and the terms of the association, 
which is formed to protect the coast of the county of Norfolk, against all 
foreign invasion, and to support the civil magistrates when called upon in 
the execution of the laws, and for the preservation of the peace, they all 
unanimously subscribed the same, and entered into the necessary regulations 
of the company. The volunteers were tU^n handsomely entertained by 
their captain. After dinner, several loyal and constitutional toasts were 
drunk, — 

'' The King and the Constitution, 

"Queen and Royal family, etc 

'*The Melton Volunteers with Sir Edward Astley at their head, 

"Lord Townshend and the Norfolk Rangers, 

"The Holt Volunteers, and Capt Jewell, 

'*The Volunteers of the County of Norfolk, those who are, and are 
to be, 

'* Lord Orford and the Norfolk Militia, 

" May the liberties of Great Britain be defended by Freemen and 
Volunteers, 

*' Lord Keppel and the Navy, 

''Lord Howe and the British Fleet, 

'' General Conway and the Army, 

<< Old Elliot and the Rock of Gibraltar, 

" Unanimity in our Councils, and vigour in our measures, 

"Sir Harbord Harbord, 

" Mr. Coke, prosperity to the County of Norfolk, 

" Etc, etc 

"The utmost regularity and decency prevailed throughout the day, 
and the whole concluded to the complete satisfaction of everyone present" 



The appeals made to the public by his Majesty's Ministers were 
responded to in Norfolk with a d^jee of public spirit and patriotism, which 
afforded sufficient assurance that in case the alarming state of political 
affairs which called for those appeals had continued, the means would not 
have been wanting to enable the country to meet the dangers with which 
it was threatened at so many different points. The crisis, however, passed 
away before the Government was called upon to give this further proof of 
the extent of the resources of the country ; a result which was mainly 
attributable to a strong feeling, which had for some time been growing up, 
against the policy of a longer continuance of the struggle in which we were 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1782. 25 



engaged for the subjugation of our revolted colonies. The prevalence of 
this feeling, operating with other causes, had, in the summer of 1782, led to 
the retirement of those Ministers of the Crown by whom the councils of 
England had been directed throughout the whole course of the struggle, 
and who were succeeded by others having totally different views and feelings 
as to the policy of maintaining the contest His Majesty also was, by the 
course of events, so far induced to concur in the opinion of his new advisers 
as to determine upon the expediency of conceding the great object for which 
the war was persevered in — the independence of the United States. 
The Norwich Mercury of October 26th, states: — 

''Last week Lord Viscount Townshend kissed his Majesty's hand, on 
being appointed Captain of a corps of light horse and infantry, called the 
Norfolk Rangers, being composed of his Lordships neighbours, and principal 
tenants of the county." 



The above is rather a curious and unique appointment to a Captaincy, 
as Lord Townshend at the time was full Colonel of the 2nd Dragoon Guards 
and a Lieut-General in the army. 

Shortly after this ceremony, Lord Townshend wrote the following letter 
to Sir Martin Folkes : — 

Earl Nugents, 

Gt. George St, Westr. 

27th Nov. 1782. 
Dear Sir, 

I wait with great impatience for the return from Mr Jones that 
I may apply for arms immediately, and your Commission and his, as there 
is a report of Peace, the sooner it is done the better. 

There is a party arrived from my Regt. of Dragoons and one from 
the Huntingdon Militia and are now at Dichings's. I wish the former 
were at Fakenham and the latter at Dichins, I shall soon have some chosen 
men of the 20th from Col. Gwyn and 2 from the West Norfolk which I 
hope you will quarter most conveniently for the instruction of those nearest 
you. Lady Townshend joins in best Compts. to you and Lady Folkes — 
and am, 

yrs faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 



" My regiment of Dragoons," which Lord Townshend refers to, was, 
of course, the 2nd Dragoon Guards, and the *' 20th from Col. Gwyn " are the 
20th Light Dragoons ; the " West Norfolk " are probably the West Norfolk 



26 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1782. 



Regiment Militia, and these men were no doubt sent to train the foot 
contingent of the Rangers. 

This is the first mention of any Permanent Staff of Instructors. 



Earl Nugents, Gt Greorge St, 

Westminsr 

3 Decemr. 1782 
Sir, 

I have waited for the Signature of Parties proposed by Mr Jones 
to the articles of agreement, similar to what I presented before to obtain 
Commissions. 

Mr Jones has wrote to me but I have not yet received it — in the interim 
I have applied for arms and shall when I have received the Parchment signed 
for Commissions, but I find Mr Jones says a Mr Potter is chosen with himself 
and Mr Brett — I thought the latter had declined and as to Mr Potter — it 
should seem odd that Mr Jones proceeds to choose others. It should be 
at least at a general meeting, besides we have now no less than eleven 
officers to 200 Men not all raised. This is a disproportion of Officers 
unprecedented, and if we have more it may expose us to some ridicule. I 
think Mr. Potter should at least be postponed to a future Augmentation. 

I enclose a power to quarter the men as they arrive which we have 
got from the Regiments to discipline our Corps. The Party of my Regt of 
Dragoons should I think go to Fakenham, the two of the Huntingdon to 
Dichins's; they are both arrived, and those which are to come to the other 
Towns when the Arms come down Til send for the men. 
All here are well and much your humble Servts., 

Yrs faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 



[Enclosure] 

It is his Majestys pleasure that you cause two Light 
Dragoons, and light Infantry Men from different Regiments 
REEDHAM. to be quartered as occasion may require at the places 
DOCKING. mentioned in the margin hereof, for the purpose of disciplining 
FAKENHAM. your Lordships and other Provincial Corps. Wherein the 
RAYNHAM. civil Magistrate and all others concerned are to be assisting 
STIFFKEY. in providing Quarters impressing Carriages and otherwise as 

there shall be occasion. Given at the War Office this 30th day 
of November 1782. 

By his Majestys Command, 
General G. W. YOUNGR 

Lord Viscount Townshend. 



SIR MARTIN BROWNE FOI.KES, Bart., 

HiLLiNCTON Hall, Norfolk, 

Norfolk Rangers Yeomanrv Cavalry, 

1783- 

sissioH 0/ Sir WiViam ffolkcs, B^rt. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1782. 27 

Sir, 

A visitor I own I hoped never would have called has confined 
me at home sometime, however I have done my best to accelerate our 
Equipments for our Corps. The Arms I have had carefully looked over 
and 100 firelocks &a will be down soon. The Ordnance have undertaken 
to make the carabines for ye Horse in ye Pattern I have given in cheaper 
which I much doubt , and have allowed some one half of ye prize 

for ye Accoutrements which will retard ye rest. I wrote some time ago to 
Ld. Orford to desire he would as Ld. Lieut give in yr. name and Mr Jones 
for ye Commissions, but have not yet heard from him — he is in Wiltshire 
and I suppose engaged with her [sic ; ? hare) Coursing. 

If I do not hear soon I will write to ye Secretary of State upon it Our 
Commissions before hung with ye latter. I hope it will not be long before 
we shall begin to discipline our men. We shall sett out for Rainham in a few 
days and as we shall meet so soon will trouble you no more at present Lady 
Townshend is just carrying me to see ye divine Mrs. Siddons act, and desires 
her compts. to you and Lady Folkes with mine. Adieu, 

Yrs faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 

Gt George Street, 

23rd Dec 1782. 

Rainham, 

December 30th 
Sir, 

I a few days ago informed you I had waited with some anxiety, I 
believe, for an answer from Lord Orford, and had wrote to him again at 
Brandon I heard he was shortly expected from one of his servants, on 
which I left a letter for his Lordsp. Since then I have found a letter from 
him on my arrival here, which I enclose — as I took ye liberty to mention 
to you whether peace or war — I think ye security of ye Country in either 
case must result (tho late I fear) from ye exertions of its inhabitantSp and 
I think our own honor is in some degree pledged not to dwindle into a 
meer temporary proposition or parade. 

Your situation in the Compy. will be ye same as if 3^ur Commission 
was received — 

You must know, Sir, that there is nothing in this Country that passes 
with celerity but a jobb. Every fair, ostensible public proposition must pass 
thro ye ordeal of political and party sceptics and convince doubtfuU minds 
of their effects before they will acknowledge their principles. We wd. Aot 
allow an Irish Militia and now the Country is all armed and superior 



28 The Records of the Yeontanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1783. 



without a Commission, there are many, Sir, who consider our poor Umited 
Rangers as a dreadful innovation, and had rather compromise with an 
outlawed Smugler or Ld. Greo. Gordon than break ye peace or ye Sabbath, by 
exercising on a Sunday. 

We are certainly slow in arming and training ; but I trust that we 
shall neither be fluctuating or contemptible when we first begia I do not 
intend on this account to go up by yr birthday, I expect 100 arms down 
in a few days — and shall be happy if you will meet ye other officers of our 
Corps on Sunday next at dinner and we can then r^ulate ye places and 
depots for them. Lady Townshend will be happy to see Lady Folkes and 
that you'll take a bed — let us shoot ye next day. 

On the 18th we beg to give a Rangers Ball here. 

I am, Dear Sir, 

Yrs. faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 



1783. 
Negociations were now simultaneously entered into with the American 

Colonies, and with the Courts of France and Spain, which led, in the 

beginning of the year 1783, to the signature at Versailles of a preliminary 

treaty, and this was immediately followed by the ratification of a definite 

treaty of peace between the belligerent powers. 

That the services of the Volunteers of this period had been highly 

appreciated by the Government is proved in a passage of his Majesty's 

speech to both Houses of Parliament on the opening of the Session, Dec sth, 

1782. After alluding to the security in which our own coasts had been 

maintained, and the domestic tranquillity which had been enjoyed, the speech 

proceeds: — "This respectable state, under the blessing of God, I attribute 

to the entire confidence which subsists between me and my people, and to 

the readiness which has been shown by my subjects in every part of my 

kingdom, to stand forth in the general defence." 



Hanover Square. 

March nth. 
Dear Sirs, 

I this day had ye pleasure of obtaining your commission from ye 
Ofiice in consequence of my relation Lord Sydney's attention, or there I believe 
it might have remained to all eternity — for Mr. Rose whom I sent for it to-day 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolky 1783. 29 



tells me that Mr. Pollock the first clerk to him assured him that there had been 
no application made to the Secretary of State. If Lord Orford had told me 
in his letter that he had not'or*did not choose to apply I should have under- 
stood him better — my only impediment to this more effectual application to ye 
Secretary of State was my deference to ye Lord Lieutenant and wishing to 
comply with the accustomed requisites in ye first instance. The Militia being 
to be disbanded I have sent to discharge ye party at Rainham who were to 
instruct our Corps there but shall retain my Dragoons. They are at your 
orders if you have any commanding for them and as my Regiment is coming 
from Scotland shall always procure assistance from thence. Nothing I hear is 
as yet fixed as to a Ministry. All is confusion, I wonder ye public is so 
patient. Dunning and Lord .Gower were last sent for but I hear today Lord 
Mansfield. I am sorry I cannot attend you at Thetford in our uniform — I 
hope to have that pleasure at ye Summer Assizes. 
Our best compts. to Lady Folkes. 

Yours faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 



The aspect of public affairs at this period afforded to every loyal and 
reflecting Englishman abundant ground for anxiety and alarm ; for although 
the negociations for peace were, in the course of the year 1783, brought to a 
satisfactory conclusion by the signature of definitive treaties, as well with the 
hostile powers of the Continent as with the United States of America, the 
treaties thus concluded were of a nature which prevented them being looked to 
with confidence as guarantees of permanent tranquillity — the mere circumstance 
of negociating for peace with numerous portions of our fellow-subjects in the 
character of allies of a foreign power, whilst it was a fruitful source of distrust 
and alarm as to the stability of the peace, occasioned also a complication of 
interests, in the highest degree difficult of adjustment. In a state of affairs so 
unprecedented no one could pretend to foretell what would be the result to the 
mother country of the treaty thus concluded — ^a treaty under which a large 
portion of the Empire was at once dismembered, and erected into an indepen- 
dent state in the midst of some of our most exposed and valuable territories ; 
whilst the greatest uncertainty was felt as to the nature of the relations, 
political and commercial, which might be expected to subsist between this new 
republic and the ancient crown of England. 

Notwithstanding, however, all the anticipations of ruin to England from 
the American War, and from the treaty by which it was terminated, and 
notwithstanding the real and inevitable evils to which she was exposed from 
the exhaustion of her finances, and the pressure of the public debt upon every 



30 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1783. 



class of society, this country took immediate advantage of the return of peace, 
and the two years which succeeded the treaty of Versailles were distinguished 
by a progressive advance and extension of all branches of national industry 
and prosperity to a degree unparalleled in any other nation ; and it may be 
remarked as a fact, not less singular than gratifying, that the period, in which 
England made these advances in the arts of peace and internal improvement, 
was one in which nearly every other country and government in Europe was 
the scene of political convulsions and internal agitation checking or preventing 
a similar development of their national resources. 

Without pretending to examine the various causes which enabled England 
at this period to offer so favourable a contrast to the political situation of her 
Continental neighbours, it may be sufficient to remark that, under the constitu- 
tion and practice of our Government, the rights and liberties of the people had 
been so effectually asserted and so accurately defined that the abstract theories 
and new principles of independence, by which other countries were agitated, 
had with us comparatively few materials to work upon ; where the great body 
of the people were in a situation fully to understand and to assert their rights, 
they naturally felt a common interest in supporting the institutions under 
which they were established It was a feeling of this sort which led to the 
formation of all these various corps of Yeomanry and Volunteers, not only in 
the county of Norfolk, but throughout the United Kingdom : and though the 
return of peace had rendered their continuance as a military body unnecessary 
during the period of peace from 1783 to 1793, the spirit of these corps did not 
cease to animate as well its late members as numerous other individuals in the 
same class of society, who were well known to hold themselves in readiness to 
come forward in a similar manner, whenever their services might be of public 
utility. 



1784. 
At this time in Norfolk there was a prevalence of smuggling on the coast, 
and it was the custom to employ the regular cavalry which happened to be 
quartered in the county in aid of the Custom House authorities to assist them 
in their duties. In the year 1784, the 16th Queen's Regiment of Light 
Dragoons were billeted in Norfolk, and were ordered out to aid the preventive 
service. On the 25th September, Mr. William Green and Mr. Samuel Rennett, 
two Customs officers, stationed at Snettisham, received information that a 
quantity of smuggled goods had been landed on the beach at Hunstanton. 
Accompanied by a party of the i6th Dragoons, the officers rode to the beach, 
and without much difficulty effected a seizure. Under escort of the cavalry, 
the officials proceeded to remove the booty to their headquarters, but, when 



lil^llili 



yi*5 ^l^ .' ^;: 










T 

4 

4 

i4 



-4 






' t 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1784. 31 



marching along a lane leading from the seashore, a large body of smugglers, 
armed with carbines and sidearms, and headed by the captain of the cutter 
which had landed the cargo, intercepted them. A fierce conflict ensued, in 
which William Webb, a private in the Dragoons, was shot in the head. Not 
satisfied with wounding him, the desperadoes fired two more shots at him, one 
of which passed through his neck, and the other penetrated his body, killing 
him instantly, Mr. Green's horse was shot under him, and a moment later 
another bullet settled the officer himself. An onslaught was next made upon 
Mr. Rennett, who was also done to death by the smugglers. The Dragoons 
apprehended William Kemble, the captain of the cutter, and Andrew Gunton 
and Thomas Williams, two of the crew, whom they carried before the Rev. 
Dixon Hoste, a local magistrate. The justice, after hearing the evidence, 
committed the prisoners to Norwich Castle, there to await their trial on the 
charge of '' wilfully firing on Custom-house officers, and on a party of his 
Majestys i6th Regiment of Light Dragoons as they were peaceably riding 
along the Kings highway in the parish of Hunstanton." Several of the 
carbines taken from the smugglers were identified as cavalry weapons, bearing 
the War Office mark. These had evidently been taken from soldiers in other 
affrays, and had, no doubt, formed part of the armament of the cutter, which 
was the joint property of the prisoner Kemble and a man named Frankland. 
The trial of the prisoners came on at the Norfolk Lent Assizes held at 
Thetford, on March 17th, 1785. Contrary to the expectation of the court, and 
in face of all common sense, the jury acquitted the prisoners. Mr. Murphy, 
counsel for the Crown, moved for a new trial, and observed that '* if a Norfolk 
jury were determined not to convict persons who were guilty of the most 
atrocious crimes there was an end to all justice." A fresh indictment was 
prepared, and the prisoners were again put upon their trial. The same evidence 
was preferred against them, and the case to all intents and purposes proved to 
the hilt, but the jury, after three hours' absence, again returned a verdict of 
acquittal, and three of the greatest scoundrels in Norfolk were allowed to walk 
out of the court free men. 



1785. 
At this period, after the declaration of peace between England and 
France, I can find no mention of the Norfolk Rangers, although I have searched 
carefully all the old newspaper files of the time, and other sources ; but no 
doubt they were held in abeyance, for there is no mention either of their 
disbandment I'robably they still retained their arms and equipment at their 
homes, and were ready to give their services if called upon. On the 29th 
September, 1792, I find that Lord Townshend reviewed, at Raynham, the 



32 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1785-91, 



Norfolk Rangers, but this is the only mention of the corps during these 3rears 
of peace. As to whether they performed any exercise or training during 
this period, history is silent. I r^ret, too, that I have quite failed to obtain 
any information of the eleven officers mentioned by Lord Townshend in his 
letter of 3rd December, 1782, with the exception of Sir Martin Folkes. 
History does not relate either, if Mr. Jones and Mr. Potter were eventually 
received as officers of the corps of Norfolk Rangers. 

Therefore from 1783 up to 1791, the date of the breaking out of the 
French Revolution, there is very little to relate about the doings of our local 
or regular horse in the county of Norfolk. But this outbreak of our neighbours 
across the Channel was regarded in this county (before the burnings, the 
plunderings, and the murders which ensued) with no little favour, especially 
among the class of politicians who had been longing for a more perfect 
representation of the people in the British Parliament. 

The events which took place in the summer of 1791 foreshadowed troubles, 
or at least grave apprehensions in England. The Marquis Townshend wrote 
to Lord Orford, from Raynham, in September, suggesting the formation of 
Associations of the gentry and farmers, so that, '*when the explosions of 
political enthusiasm or craft might break forth here or elsewhere they might 
not be altogether unprepared. In this county in particular," he continued, 
"vigilence is necessary, as upon any sudden decline of the Norwich manu- 
facture, or upon a rise in the price of provisions, riots have followed, and our 
magistrates in this part of the county have sometimes been intimidated to 
inaction or disgraceful compliance." 

At this time there were symptoms of great unrest in the county. 
Mason, in liis " History of Norfolk/' relates bread riots became of frequent 
occurrence in all parts of England owing to the high price of provisions, 
and in consequence of the lack of employment for labour which periodically 
occurred. On the loth October, 1792, Mr. Charles Townshend, writing from 
Honingham, urged the Government to put a stop to the exportation of wheat, 
for there were great fears of scarcity ; and a fortnight later, Yarmouth was 
the scene of very violent outbreaks. The Mayor received an intimation of 
what would occur in a letter which said: — 

'* This is to let you no that if you dont give publick orders to all 
Bakers in this town to lower the Bread by Satarday next and stop every 
ship laden with Corn for forighn market, and give publick notice Wendnsday 
in Markets for Butter, Meat &c, to be lowred you may depend without for 
nottis if this is not complid with — ^your head shall com from your shoulders 
and your house to the ground. You will have no notis but this, and if 
this is not answerd by Bel man Wednsday we shall not waight till Saturday 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1792. 33 



befoar we pay you a visit. We have now select for this pirpous 300 and 
mean to dubel that nomber by the time. 

Yarmouth Oct 21 1792 
PS Dont Htsitate, if you do your head will soon be over the Bridge. 



1792 
On the 27th October, a mob gathered and committed petty depre- 
dations, for which two of the ringleaders were seized by the local 
authorities and committed to gaol. This exasperated the rest, and though 
a slight lull occurred, many hours had not passed before Mr. Edmund 
Lacon, the Mayor, found himself confronted at his house with a demand 
for the release of the imprisoned rioters, or as an alternative, the 
destruction of the prison. Thus assailed, the Mayor sent round for 
the principal inhabitants at once to meet him at the Town Hall, 
where he called upon them to support him in the preservation of the 
peace and the dispersion of the mob. But the mob were angry, and 
not disposed to yield to any demonstration of moral force such as the Mayor 
could command. Whilst the Town Hall party were arranging their plans, 
the populace gathered at the gaol, forced the doors, set free their friends, 
and, armed with bludgeons, prepared to encounter moral with physical force. 
A skirmish ensued, the Mayor himself was knocked down, and the friends 
of order sustained a temporary defeat Messengers were dispatched to 
Norwich, to Lowestoft, and to Winterton for troops, and by the 30th 
Yarmouth was occupied by two officers, one quartermaster, two sergeants, 
three corporals, and thirty-five men of the ist King's Dragoon Guards ; 
after which it is needless to say the disturbers of the peace had no further 
hopes of attaining their purpose. 

It appears that in consequence of these riots, the Secretary at War 
inquired of Colonel Vyse, commanding the King's Dragoon Guards, why 
he had not made Norwich his headquarters, for that officer had reported 
he could not spare troops from Norwich, and for such emergencies as that 
of Yarmouth he would have to send men from out-districts. The Colonel 
replied that he** had never made Norwich his headquarters, because Ipswich 
afforded several conveniences not to be found at Norwich, which he considered 
one of the very worst places for young soldiers — a place where the most 
daring and dangerous publications were in daily circulation— a place where 
the most destructive principles were openly avowed — where houses of resort 
were open for public discussion of those principles," &c 

In this year the King conveyed a message to both Houses of Parliament 
proclaiming the necessity of being prepared against the hostility denounced 

C 



34 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1792. 



by the people of France, as well as the danger arising amongst ourselves 
from the "Corresponding Societies." It was at this time the policy of 
England to avoid all interference in the affairs of her neighbour, and she 
accordingly took no part in the coalition formed by the emigrant princes 
of France with the Powers of the Continent for the purpose of releasing 
Louis XVI. from the thraldom in which he was held by his subjects. The 
fatal results of this coalition and its effects in exciting the revolutionary 
fury of France and hastening the murder of the King are well known ; in 
the same year, by the open declaration of hostility against all kingly 
Governments, the Government of England was unwillingly compelled to take 
a part in the contest This public declaration had for some years been 
preceded by the more secret attempts of revolutionary emissaries and 
propagandists to disseminate their doctrines and gain partisans throughout 
Europe; and these attempts had been so far successful in this country 
that numerous democratic societies had been formed whose avowed object 
was fraternisation and correspondence with the Jacobins of France The 
danger of such a correspondence was sufficiently apparent ; the loyal and 
patriotic people of England were not slow in taking alarm and in concerting 
measures for the purpose of counteracting the revolutionary tendency of 
these societies, and it can readily be believed that amongst those whose 
loyal and patriotic exertions were not less conspicuous than other counties 
were the members of the Norfolk Rangers. Throughout the ten years of 
peace it is evident that the corps must have been kept together in some 
way or other, as I find again in the Norwich Mercury of January i8th, 
I793> the following announcement : — 

1793 
** Yesterday sennight, the Marquis Townshend gave his annual elegant 

entertainment, at Rainham Hall, to the corps of Norfolk Rangers, which 
was raised by his Lordship during the last war. Many loyal and con- 
stitutional toasts and songs were given and sung on the occasion, and the 
day was spent with that joyous festivity, for which that hospitable mansion 
is so eminently distinguished." 



CHAPTER II. 

1794 to 1802. 

Fencible and Piwisional Cavalry — Carrespofidence re Norfolk Rangers — 
Court' Martial on Lieut, Alexander^ of Norfolk Fencible Cavalry — 
Training and Equipment of Yeomanry^ 1796 — Raising of Norwich 
Light Horse Volunteers by fohn Harvey^ 1798 — Return of Troops 
from Wakheren Expedition and Reception at Norwich^ 1799 — Dis- 
bandment of Fencible Cavalry at Dereham^ 1800 — Norfolk Smugglers^ 
1 80 1 — Disbandment of Yeomanry and thanks of Parliament to them 
1802. 

We have already, in the preceding chapter, referred to the military 
ardour which called into existence the independent companies of Volunteers, 
raised in 1781, for the purpose of repelling the threatened invasion. 
Peace was proclaimed in October, 1782, and it was not until 1791 that 
the nation was again agitated by rumours of war. On April 29th in 
that year a Common Hall was convened in Norwich, at which resolu- 
tions expressive of the great impolicy of a war with Russia were 
unanimously adopted. In December, 1792, it was found necessary to 'call 
out the Militia, to equip and commission vessels, and to take extraordinary 
precautions, in consequence of the threatening attitude of France. The 
occurrence of the Great French Revolution soon led to events which 
again created a ferment in men's minds in England, increased by the 
agitations of the numerous political societies in London and all the large 
towns, and in which the Radicals of Norwich took a prominent part. 
On February ist, 1793, it was announced that M. Chauvelin, the French 
representative, had left this country, and the immediate necessity arose 
for augmenting both the Army and Navy. War was declared in due 
time, and great exertions were made to complete our armament His 
Majesty, on the 22nd February, 1794, called the attention of Parliament 
to the state of the land forces, and urged the expediency of increasing 
and strengthening the Navy. At length the Government awoke to the 
importance of supplementing the Regular Army and the Militia by the aid 



36 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



of horse and foot Volunteer Corps; for Mr. Pitt, on the 5th March, 1794, 
when proposing to the House of Commons various measures for 
strengthening the national defence, said : — 

'^As an augmentation of the cavalry for internal defence was a very 
material object, they might under certain circumstances have a species of 
Cavalry consisting of gentlemen and yeomen, who might not be called 
out of their respective counties, but on the pressure of an emergency." 

Accordingly, the Lords-Lieutenant of counties were invited a few 
days later to raise Yeomanry Cavalry. The officers were to receive 
commissions from his Majesty ; all ranks were to find their own horses ; 
no bounty or levy money for the cost of uniform and equipment was 
to be given, though arms and accoutrements were to be provided by 
the Crown ; cavalry pay was to be allowed, and military law was to 
apply when the corps were called out. 

On March 8th, 1 794, the following announcement appeared in the 
Norwich Mercury: — 

" MILITIA. 

''Mr. Pitt means to propose a measure to Parliament this day, 
respecting the augmentation of the Militia. The nature of the proposal, 
we understand to be the same as was adopted in the last war by 
increasing the militia by volunteer companies. In addition to this, in 
towns upon the sea coast in particular, encouragement is also to be 
given for raising corps for their own defence. 

"Cavalry are also to be raised, Grovernment to pay for the horses, 
arms, clothing, etc, and temporary rank to be given to those who raise 
them, according to the number of men they procure. 

"It is likewise proposed to form troops of Horse in some places, to 
consist of the gentlemen and yeomanry of counties, the officers of which 
are to have temporary commissions. 

^ These bodies of cavalry to be attached to the particular county in 
which they are raised, unless called out by invasion, or the appearance 
of invasion, or for the suppression of riots in the neighbouring counties ; 
while on service they are to receive pay. Companies of infantry, for the 
batteries on the coast, are likewise proposed, each company is to consist 
of a Captain, two lieutenants, and 60 to 70 men, some of whom are 
to act as pioneers when necessary. The officers are to have commissions; 
they are to assemble every week to exercise, and to be paid on the 
day of exercise ; and to have arms and accoutrements furnished at 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1794. 37 



the expense of Government ; and not to be removed from the places 
for the particular safety of which they are intended, unless upon any 
great emergency. Plans, of which the above, we understand, are the 
heads, have been sent to the Lord Lieutenants and principal gentlemen 
of several counties for their approbation." 



From the above, it will be seen that there were to be raised two 
distinct forces of domestic cavalry ; the first, a mounted militia, afterwards 
called Fencible Cavalry, who were enlisted to serve in any part of the 
United Kingdom for cavalry pay ; the other, a force composed of gentlemen 
and yeomen, who were to be called upon to serve only in the county in 
which they were raised. Further, it was laid down that the hire of a 
troop horse would be allowed at the price of 2j. a week, and the price 
at £2^, 

The person who, upon the above terms raises two troops is to have 
the temporary rank of Major; he who raises four that of Lieutenant 
Colonel ; and he who raises six, that of Colonel. 

The Fencible Cavalry were in reality troops enlisted for service at 
home and for the duration of the war only, and were designed to liberate 
the Regular Army from the United Kingdom for service abroad. It is 
extremely difficult to arrive at their actual strength, for their establishment 
was frequently reduced (in the hope of forcing the discharged men to 
enter the regiments of the line) and as frequently re-augmented. Most of 
the Fencible Corps were created in 1794 or 1798, and to judge by the old 
Army Lists of 1799, the greatest number of them in existence at one time 
in Great Britain was thirty-one regiments; but by March, 1800, the greater 
part of them had been disembodied. 

The first intimation we have of the raising of the Fencibles is in a 
paragraph in the Norwich Mercury of March 29th, 1794: — 

"Colonel Loftus (son in law of Marquis Townshend) of Stiffkey, and 
George Jerningham Esq. of Costessey are raising troops of Fencible Light 
Horse to serve in the Kingdom during the war. Captain Browning is now 
at Eye upon a similar plan." 



As regards the corps raised by Colonel Loftus this may have been 
originally raised for purposes of Fencible ; but the corps became afterwards 
the 24th Light Dragoons; they were raised in Norfolk, and were composed 
almost entirely of Norfolk mea Regarding Greorge Jerningham, I can find 
no mention of him. 



38 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1794. 



Again, in the Norfolk Chronicle of April 12th, 1794, I find: — 

"We are authorised to say that the Hon. Mr Harbord has offered to 
raise a corps of six troops of cavalry, and that his Majesty has been 
graciously pleased to express his approbation. These troops are to serve 
in Great Britain." 

This is the corps which appears in the Army Lists of this year as 
the Norfolk Fencible Cavalry. They were, to all intents and purposes, 
mounted Mih'tia, and were liable to serve in any part of the United 
Kingdom. Many of these Fencible Corps did excellent service during the 
Irish Rebellion of 1798. Though £s 5^. a man levy money was at this 
time being offered in the Regulars during the same month, increased by 
August to £1^ 15J. and £i% i&r., and thirty regiments of Fencible 
Cavalry were being enlisted in Great Britain, this appeal met with a 
pretty good response, and within a few months something like five 
thousand men had been raised. In the great majority of cases, the 
Yeomanry were raised in the first instance by troops, '*the Gentlemen 
and Yeomanry," reinforced by "respectable persons" and '* substantial 
inhabitants" of a district, combining to offer their services with those of 
their horses. The normal strength of these troops was fifty to sixty, but 
they differed considerably. 

The officers of the Norfolk Fencible Cavalry, as they appear in the 
lists for 1794, are given as under: — 



Colonel 
Lieut Colonel 
Major 


Hon W. Asheton Harbord 
Jacob H. Astley 
Edward Astley 


Captains 

m 


Thomas <le la Beach 
John Smith 
John Whitaker 


Capt. Lieut 


John Varlo 



Lieuts. William Mathew 

Robert Alexander 
Augustus Duggen 
Richard Cokelvy Hill 
James Hulton 



LiEUT.-CoLONKL HON. WILLIAM ASSHLTON HARBORD, 

Commanded Norfolk Fknciule Cavalry, 

1794 TO 1800. 

From Iht picture in Iht poatJsioH of Lard Suftld, of Cunten Park. Norfolk. 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 39 



Cornets 


Alexander Davidson 




William Sherwin Thomas 




Christopher Christmas 




John White 




John Chambers 




John Tomlinson 


Adjutant 


Robert Alexander 


Chaplain 


William Churchill 


Surgeon 


John Toke 


Agents 


Cox and Greenwood 



6 quartermasters ; 24 sergeants ; 24 corporals ; 6 trumpeters ; 400 privates. 

They were quartered at Carlisle in 1797, and at Edinburgh in 1798. 

In the diary of the Right Hon. William Windham, of Felbrigg, I find 
that, in writing to Captain Lukin in 1794, he says: — 

Hiil Street : 

March 22, 1794 

"There is another business, indeed, that may call me towards Norfolk. 
With a view to the possibility of a descent, troops of different sorts are 
proposed to be raised in aid of the militia, one class of which are to be 
volunteer cavalry, composed of persons who are in a state to furnish their 
own horses, and till they are called out of the country, which is to be only 
in the case of actual invasion, are to receive no pay, nor anything from 
Government, but their saddles and arms. What think you of the possibility 
of my raising a troop of fifty such persons, including such or part of those 
concerned who may be willing to hire or bring with them men in addition 
to themselves." 

In the month of April, in consequence of a circular letter addressed to 
the Lords-Lieutenant of counties, a meeting was held at the Shirehall, 
Norwich, to consider the steps to be taken, with the sanction of Parliament, 
for the internal defence and security of the Kingdom, when resolutions, 
moved by the Hon. C. Townshend, and supported by the Marquis 
Townshend, Lord Walsingham, Mr. Buxton, Mr. Windham, and Mr. Jodrell, 
were passed in favour of the formation of Volunteer corps of cavalry, and 
of raising subscriptions for their maintenance. Those who spoke in opposition 



40 The Records of the Yeotnanry Cavalry of Norfolk, \ 794, 

were Mr. Coke, Mr. Mingay, and Mr. J. Barnard. The first-mentioned 
gentleman condemned the war in toto^ insisted that it might have been 
avoided, or at least brought to a conclusion by a negociation for peace, and 
moved, as an amendment, that ''it is our duty to refuse private sub- 
scriptions for public purposes as illegal and unconstitutional benevolence." 
Great altercation and confusion ensued, and when the High SheriflT put the 
motion, it was found impossible to decide which party had the majority. 
A division being deemed impracticable, Mr. Dashwood proposed that such 
gentlemen as chose to subscribe should retire with him to the Grand Jury 
Chamber. This course was subsequently adopted ; and nearly £6,ocx} was 
promised in the room, and the sum was afterwards increased to ;f 11,000. 
Rc^er Kerrison, Esq., was appointed Treasurer. 

The immediate result was the formation of several troops of Yeomanry 
Cavalry, and the following are the corps in Norfolk which appear in the lists 
of the War Office for 1794. No doubt there were others in course of 
formation, but I will deal with them as they come forward in sequence of 
dates, and in order of formation. 

Hingham corps — Captain ; B. Gurdon Dillingham. 

Norfolk Rangers — Major; George, Marquis Townshend. 

East Dereham corps — Captain ; Thomas Wodehouse. 

The rapidity with which these corps of Volunteers and Yeomanry were 
raised would be flattering to the national vanity, were it not susceptible of 
a commonplace explanation. By a certain clause in the Act, Volunteers 
and Yeomanry were exempted from service in the Militia, upon producing 
a certificate that they had attended exercise punctually during six weeks 
previously to the hearing of appeals against the Militia list This 
dissociation of the Volunteers from the Militia was a great and disastrous 
blunder, which has never yet been thoroughly repaired. It is, however, 
sufficient to note for the present that the Government had deliberately set 
up four different descriptions of auxiliary forces, Militia, Fencibles, Yeo- 
manry, and Volunteers, all competing with each other and with the 
regular Army. 

The following are the articles of enrolment for the Norfolk Rangers 
dated 1794 ; the original of which was placed at my disposal by Sir 
William ffulkes, of Hillington Hall. 

Docking, 

Norfolk, 

June 9th 1794 
We whose names are hereunto subscribed do inroll ourselves to serve 
during the War in the Yeomanry Cavalry, under the following conditions — 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 794. 



41 



To consist of the Gentlemen and Yeomanry — The Officers to receive 
temporary Commissions from His Majesty, and the Muster Roll to be 
approved by His Majesty, or by the Lord Lieutenant. To have no Levy 
Money — The Horses to be found by Ourselves; The Arms & Accoutre- 
ments by Government — To be exercised Once in a week during the first 
Month, afterwards once in a Fortnight, except in Time of Harvest during 
which time, to be called out only in Case of Invasion or Insurrections — 
Not to be liable to be called out into Service, but in case of Invasion 
or for the Suppression of Riots & Tumults, and in those Cases not to go 
out of our own County, unless with the Consent of Two Thirds of the 
Corps. When in Service to receive Pay as Cavalry. Government to allow 
one Sergeant & one Corporal pr Troop, & Drummers & Trumpeters with 
their Horses. No Substitutes to be admitted — Every Person acting as a 
Private to be allowed 2/- pr Day for the use of his Horse out of the 
Subscription Fund, if required — And we do hereby pledge ourselves to 
attend every Day of Exercise (unless sufficient Reason is given to the 
Contrary) & immediatly in Case of Invasion Riots or Tumults. 



Signed 

Henry Styleman 

James Coldham 

Philip Glover Junr 

Saml Whitty 

Frans Norton 

Anthy. Abel Bunn 

James Pritty 

M. Nelson 

Wm. Vitty 

Sharpe England 

James Pitcher 

Robr Johnson 

Giles Bone 

George Reader 
Jacob Noll 
Wm. Wright 
Thos. Wardale 
Richard Youngs 
Henry Lane 
Jewson 
John Cooper 
Colvin 



George Bunn 

John Humphrey 

M. B. Folkes. one of Marquis 
Townshends Rangers 

Thos Cook 

John Overton 

Charles Snell 

John Coop>er 

H. C. Frost 

John Parfrement 

Bloom Humphrey 

Chars Senkler 

Edwd. Symonds. 
Terrington St Clements 

do 
Terrington St Johns 

do 
Tilncy St Lawrence 
Wiggenhall St Margt 
Tilney 
Docking 
do 



42 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 794. 



Corey Junr 


Docking 


Bird Junr 


do 


John Norman or a man 


Hillington 


Robt Barber 


do 


John Head 


do 


Robt Clark 


do 


Martin Dodman 


Grimston 


Wm Lofty 


do 


Moore 


Warham 


Suttell 


do 


Seeds a man 


do 


Tavret a man 


do 


Farrer a man 


do 


Davis 


Wtghton 



According to the Norwich Mercury of June 21st, 1794: — 

"At a Meeting of the Committee held at the Shire-house, for the 
Internal defence and security of this county, 

"Thos Hare, Esq. in the Chair, 

" Resolved, — ist, that the sum of Three Pounds, Ten shillings be allowed 
to each Volunteer that requires it for his Cloathing. 

'* 2ly, That every Captain of a Troop do apply to the Lord-Lieutenant 
for Arms and Accoutrements." 

At a further Meeting of the Committee held on July 12th, Thomas 
Hare, Esq., in the Chair. 

" Resolved, ist. That this Committee will allow to the Commanding Officer 
of each Troop a Sum not exceeding ;f 12 to pay for the several Articles of 
Cloathing, Accoutrements and furniture of each Volunteer requiring the whole, 
and a proportionate Sum for each Volunteer who may require part of such 
Articles & choose to find the remainder himself. 

" 2ly, That the Committee will allow any difference of expence above 
the Sum allowed by Government for the Sabre out of the County 
Subscription. 

'* 3rd, That the Sergeants of each Troop provided by Government be 
allowed 2 shillings per day, including the Pay allowed by Government but 
if any Horses are found for Serjeants they shall be maintained at the 
expence of the County, and a Sum not exceeding 25 Guineas will be 
allowed each Captain of a Troop to provide such horse as is necessary. 

"4thly, That the choice of the Uniform be lefl to the Commanding 
Officer of each Troop. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 43 



"Sthly, That the Chairman be requested to write to Mr. Gill of Birmingham 
for the price of each sabre (such as generally used by the Light Dragoons) 
supposing the quantity of 300 to be ordered by the County of Norfolk* And 
in what time the above quantity could be furnished. 

''6thly, That the Treasurer be requested to call upon the Subscribers 
for ^th part of their Subscriptions including the loth already paid. And that 
it be paid into the Treasurers hands on or before the ist August. 

" That these Resolutions be printed in the Norwich and Bury Papers, 

"Signed, THOS. HARE, CHAIRMAN." 



The prices of the various articles required by a Yeoman are thus set forth 
in the Hillington papers : — 

Coat and Waistcoat ... ... ... ... 530 

Boots with Hasar Tops... ... ... ... 120 

Hat with Feather ) 

I X o 



1 



530 



Bearskin and Cockade 

MiHtary Bridle Saddle >^ 

& Furniture compleat 

the same as used by 

Regular Regts of 

Light Horse & Uniform 

Spurs & Leather Breeches ... ... ... i i o 

•. Cloak ... ... ... ... ... 21 10 o 



/■14 o o 



We now commence a series of letters which passed between Lord 
Townshend and Sir Martin Folkes and others with reference to the equipment 
of the Norfolk Rangers ; they are very amusing, and show the difficulties with 
which the organizers of this movement were beset. I give them word for 
word as they are written, and the original grammar and spelling has been 
strictly adhered to throughout. 

Langton House, 

near Brentwood. 

i6th July 1794 
Dear Sir, 

I enclose the Resolutions of the Committee at Norwich upon the 
Statement of the Articles and allowances of Government which I had 
transmitted, I conceive that our principal yeomanry will not wish to have 
their Cloaths, or Saddles paid for; and the Holsters and Padds to carry 



44 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ i794- 



their Cloaks may be easily fixed at a trifling expence. I am sorry to hear 
you had not the success you expected at Lynn, at all Events those you 
bring when joined with our Rangers, will form a Corps of two or three 
Troops, tho Mr Mason joins us, we shall want two Officers for two Troops, 
which we may form according to our numbers. The yeomanry Corps of 
other Counties are numerous and compleat, and I hope we shall not be 
long before we are the same. There need not be any training till after 
Harvest. As soon as the specimens of Arms Saddles etc, I sent to Norwich 
have been sufficiently examin'd there. You will be so good as to send for 
them, and I will then apply for such an Exchange with Government, for 
those I have at Rainham as does not correspond with the general Equipment 
for this Service. Mr Shearing upon his return to Rainham from Soham, will 
wait on you. We are all very healthy and contented in this Camp. 

Lady Townshend and my family join me in best wishes to you and yours. 

I remain, 

With perfect r^;ard, 

Your Obedient Servant 

TOWNSHEND. 

P.S. I hope the Lynn Corps have got the arms they wish'd I wrote to 
Sir William Howe about them I have applied to Sir George Howard for some 
Sei^eants &c from Chelsea to train and instruct our Corps, and he has desir'd 
me to enquire what Out Pensioners are at Norwich and in the County. Have 
you any at Lynn ? 
Sir M. B. Folkes, Bart. 

It is difficult to determine exactly what there was in the way of 
Permanent Staff in those days ; but there were sergeants and trumpeters in 
receipt of ''constant pay," who appear to some extent to have filled the 
same position. They are rather mysterious individuals, but the fact seems 
to be, that the Government in 1794 started to raise Volunteers without 
considering how they would drill and train them when raised ; and when the 
Volunteers applied for instructors, they were told (see Secretary of State, 
common letter book, May 17th, 1794) thai it was impossible to furnish drill 
sergeants to Volunteer Cavalry and Infantry, as the R^ulars and Militia 
required all their own N.-C.O.*s. Going, however, on the good old English 
principle that a lavish expenditure of money at a crisis will always make 
up for previous neglect, pay for one drill-instructor per troop or company 
was allowed, commanding officers being left to find them as they could. 
Apparently, they found them somehow, among pensioners and invalided 
soldiers. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, \ 794. 45 



Langton House, 

Near Brentwood, 

2 1st July 1794 
Dear Sir, 

I am much obliged to you for your Letter of the 17th instant, 
am sorry you had not better success in Smithdon Hundred, but hope we 
shall be able to make up 100 Rangers at least, in which case we must 
have One Field Officer and 4 Subalterns, I should be glad to be first, but 
from my present situation, and from what I heard from Lord Amherst I 
fear it will not be allowed ; if so, I hope you will take the first rank. 

I am sorry that our Corps prefer the short Pistol to the long one 
with the Butt, as I am persuaded that a Corps with the latter wou'd act 
with success in many instances where the former would be useless, and 
this is the opinion of every Officer I have convers'd with ; Suppose for 
instance a body of Cavalry was behind a Ravine or Hedge, would they 
not be dislodged or brought to action with the latter when the other wou'd 
be useless? besides as we have these long Pistols at present, I question if 
the Board of Ordnance wou'd change them ; however I will try it if the 
Corps remain in the same opinion. 

I apprehend it is meant to have bufT linings with blue Cloaks, not buff 
facings ; the former is very common. 

As to the saddles I wish you would determine upon them as you are 
full as good a Judge as myself. 

Our long heavy Swords \ hope at all events to get exchanged for Sabres. 

I will endeavour to get from Lord Amherst a proper Person or two, to 
train our Cavalry tho very difficult in the present daily Embarkations for 
Service abroad. 

I remain with the best wishes of all this family to you and yours — 

Yours faithfully, 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart TOWNSHEND. 



Undated. 
Dear Sir, 

I have received both yours. I certainly think that the Button 
holes being embroidered will be much neater than the Gold lace, now 
round the edge of the Black Velvet, as they preffer Gold to Silver, the 
Clasps on the cross Belts must certainly be Yellow. I should be very 
much obliged to you if you will order your Taylor to make me a Boy's 
Coat, exactly proper, for a pattern that we may have our's made up, 
and desire him to send it here as soon as he can. 

Our county is very backward in bringing forward these Troops, 



46 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 

considering^ the length of time since the Subscription was made. I think 
we do not make a very alert appearance. 

Give my kind love to Lady Folkes and all your young People, and 
I am dear Sir Martin, 

Yours sincerely, 
Sir Martin Folkes, Bart A. TOWNSHEND. 



Fakenham. 

Augst 19th 1794. 
Dear Sir, 

The honor of your letter, I shall ever retain a proper 

sense of. 

Had I been at Norwich, my zeal in the Service of the public would 
have received no spark of animation, from Precepts, unless enforced by 
Practice. I regret much your want of Health and sincerely hope the 
Sea Breezes of Yarmouth will enable you to take the Field with the 
Rangers, as the Commanding Officer of which, I earnestly wish may very 
soon be rendered worthy your acceptance. 

Many of us met on Sunday in Uniform, and immediatly after Divine 
Service, formed a Cavalcade and walked our Horses from the Market 
Place of Fakenham, to Hempton Green, on which we paraded, and then 
forming a line, surrounded by a very numerous and resptable Body of 
Spectators, from distant parts of the Country, who we endeavoured to 
gratify, as far as we could in our Naval State, and had the Satisfaction 
to be assured from different quarters, that the cause we are inclined to 
serve, is not like to suffer by our Compliance with the wishes of the 
Country: — As the best proof of our success, several fine recruits, 
Voluntarily enrolled themselves, upon our return to Head Quarters. We 
have agreed to meet again on Sunday the 31st inst., by which time, 
Mr. Cole has assured the Volunteers of every necessary requirements as 
far as relates to him. 14 Hats only arrived on Saturday, the demand 
from Town being so great and pressing. From my heart I wish that 
no Obstacles may prevent your honoring us with your presence at our 
next Meeting, and that our Numbers, may, by that time, be compleated. 

We all agree that our own Saddler will serve the purpose, most to 
our satisfaction, and to the general Wish, of drawing as little as may be 
from the County Subscriptions. 

I have the honor to be 

Sir, with all possible Respect 
Your much obliged 

& Obedn. hble. Servt. 
Sir M. B. Folkes, Bart. JAS JONES. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1794. 47 



From the foregoing letters it would seem that some corps had to 
provide their own uniforms and equipment ; for no levy money was 
offered in 1794, the Government only giving arms and accoutrements, ie. belts 
and cartridge boxes. They were evidently, in most cases, either found by 
the men themselves, or with the help of local patriotic funds. It was a 
common practice for corps to purchase arms themselves, rather than wait 
until the Board of Ordnance could supply them, and the authorities in 
such cases allowed the store price of the weapons, but in many cases 
they seem to have taken very long credit 

In the Norwich Mercury of August 23rd, 1794, a correspondent thus 
expresses himself concerning the Norfolk Rangers, who assembled for the 
first time on Hempton Green, near Fakenham, on Sunday last, after 
divine service : — 

*'The Norfolk Rangers, who first assembled on Sunday last, under 
the more immediate command of our Noble Lord Lieutenant, have shewn 
a very commendable degree of zeal, worthy a general imitation, in 
standing forward at so critical a moment to testify their loyalty to their 
King, and their regard for the interests of their country. I could not 
avoid being pleased to see a body of such respectable men, though not 
all in uniforms (from the difficulty of all being completed in the time 
allowed), and upon the whole well mounted, marching and counter- 
marching, to the great satisfaction of a number of spectators, and with 
high commendations from the ladies, for their zeal, spirit, and soldier-like 
appearance ; and of such approbation who would not feel proud ? " 



Langton House, 

Near Brentwood. 

25th August 1794. 
Dear Sir, 

I wrote to you sometime ago mentioning that our Corps of 
Cavalry Rangers was near com pleat far more so than many who got 
Commissions earlier, and that you would let me know if Mr Styleman 
and Mr Coldham would take Commissions — if so, these Gentlemen with 
you and Mr Mason and myself will compleat the number of Officers ; 
with respect to myself— after your letter I applied to Lord Amherst who 
reviewed with much approbation the Regiments here and at Danbury ; 
and I am in hopes I shall obtain His Majestys approbation to my 
holding the first Commission in it as you and the Corps seem to 
desire it. As the Harvest will soon be over I will the moment the 
Officers are fixt apply for the Arms and Accoutrements, having got a 



48 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



very clever person from the Dragoons here to train us and a very good 
Master to train the Horses to form and Wheel — Mr. Shearing will be here 
in a few days and he shall bring my uniform^ our Cloathing may then be 
made and fitted in the Country — I have 20 Hatts in Town, I think you 
have some, and we may soon have more. 

Lady Townshends Spirits are rather better, after the loss of our dear 
Son of which we were kept in long suspence and anxiety. 

We have had many refreshing showers here most of which seemed to 
hold their course to Norfolk, and I hope they arrived there. 

Lady Townshend and my family join in best wishes to you and Lady 

Folkes and family — 

I remain with perfect regard, 

Yours faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart 

F.S. It is curious that Mr. Botham should call on me in Town to 
inform me that Loddon Hundred and Sir Edmund Bacon and Sir Thomas 
Beauchamp complained of my neglecting them, because I did not carry 
into execution what was inconsistent with the propositions and resolutions 
of Government, and adopted at the County Meeting. 



Fakenham. 

August 26th 1794 
Dear Sir, 

I am favoured with yours, and truly concerned that Lord and 
Lady Townshend have met with so severe a trial I can sympathise with 
them, and do so sincerely : — Your honoring us with your presence on Hempton 
Green on Sunday next will afford general satisfaction — but to no one more 
than myself, who should feel myself happy if you would allow me to offer 
you a Mutton Chop at your own hour. I am now a Batchelor —having left 
Mrs Jones and my daughter yesterday at Hingham with Captain and Mrs 
Murray. Mr. Dillinghams Corps or rather Troop— amounts to 60 and getting 
on — with their Horses but have not yet received their Arms or Cloathing 
— they have got a steady good Fellow, who taught the Foot Rangers in 
1782. He was in the nth Dragoons — and is now a pensioner. I wish we 
had such a one. I cannot but regret that we did not form as one Corps, 
and compleat a Regiment. Then the Noble Marquis's wish might have 
been gratified — by being Colonel and you of course our Lieut Coll — but as it 
is no one can stand forward but yourself. I wish Mr. Styleman and Mr. 
Coldham would join us, for without Gentlemen to take Commissions ; you 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1794* 49 



cannot be comrortable — nor can anyone, who has the smallest pretention to 
liberal sentiments. 

As far as I am able to learn, about 84 is the number enrolled — and I 
hope by our apparance on Sunday— we shall increase our number — if not 
com pleat the 100. 

We go to Church here at 3 o clock and by the time we muster, mount 
and form our rank — and march to Hempton Green it will be 5 — would you 
head us from the Market Place — it would have a good effect — but we shall 
cheerfully submit to what is most agreeable to yourself, so that we are 
cheered by your Presence. 

The Sabres, Saddles, Pistols &c are at Mr Coles and have been 
inspected by the Rangers but I do not know that the Sabres are ordered — 
Neither are the Belts; 100 pair of short necked Spears. Mr Cole has 
sent for. But I think every order should be by the direction of the 
Commanding Officer and until all Appointments are filled. We may be 
satisfied without putting ourselves too forward. We shall soon compleat 
our equipment, when we are under proper Command — which I hope will 
now soon be settled to the general satisfaction of the Corps — the Heigham 
Volunteers have their own saddles and so I hope shall we, as I know it 
coincides with your Opinion to which I always look up — with pleasure and 
respect 

You kindly allow a private Soldier to write freely his Sentiments. I 
therefore do it ; — but with great deference, being — 

Dear Sir, 
Your much obliged and obedient Hble, Servt 

JAMES JONES. 
Sir Martin Folkes, Bart. 



Wednesday, 

Septr. 3rd, 1794. 
Dear Sir, 

I reed, your last Favor and was not a little disappointed that you 
could not honor us with a look, at least, on Sunday last 60 of the 
Rangers assembled and under the direction of the Marquis Townshends 
Dragoons Recruiting here. We attempted to make what Progress we 
could. A Riding School has been voluntarily opened at Helhoughton, 
where many Horses have been put in training. This shews a desire to 
get forward ; at present my Horses remain as ignorant as myself, and as 
Fakenham and Hempton muster about 15 Volunteers, I hope we shall have 
some Persons ordered to assist us nearer than Helhoughton. I therefore 



50 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1794. 



wait with patience the Marquis Orders. , Great enquiry was made for Sir 
Martin Folkes under whose command we all wish to be put, and the sooner 
the better, as» till Officers are appointed, I agree entirely with you. It is 
but an awkward thing to assume a command yet, if you would indulge us 
once more with Voluntary Meeting, the gratification would be great, more 
particularly to myself, whose highest satisfaction arises from your being of 
the Corps. We assemble again on Sunday next at Fakenham at \ past 2 
o'clock, Parade to Church at 3., and immediatly after Divine Service, mount 
and march to Hempton Green. We hope by that day to compleat our 
Numbers, but, had the Docking Party joined us to a Man, we should have 
been compleat indeed^ both in Officers and Men, My warmest wish on this 
occasion, is, that we may have Gentlemen to command us, and that soon. 

Be assured it was not me who appeared in the Mercury, nor any one of 
this Corps. I saw, indeed, the Paragraph before it went to the Press, and 
thought it by much too flairing, but I believe it was well meant as a 
Compliment The 20 Hats that were sent to the Marquis Mr Cole has 
received. Mr. C. thinks the Sabres were ordered by the Committee the day 
we had the honor to meet you there. I confess, I did not so understand 
it, but, that the Chairman was to write to Mr Gill of Birmingham, to enquire 
in what time 300 Sabres could be furnished supposing that to be the 
number wanted for the Country. 

The Rangers seem very anxious to compleat their furniture, and get 
their Arms &c. I urged exertion to compleat the 100 ist, that Officers 
might be appointed, to whom every Regulation should be submitted however 
it was proposed and agreed to order 50 Uniform Bridles like that produced 
in the Committee at Norwich and seen at Mr. Cole's, to be furnished by a 
Saddler who is of the Corps, and works for the Marquis, and also 50 pair 
of Stirrup Irons, to have our own Sadies fitted with Haulsters &c. like the 
pattern, and the facings of the Saddles to be Tan'd Leather. This is all I 
recollect being proposed, if you'll do me the honor to take your Mutton 
with me on Sunday next, and a well air'd bed. I shall feel myself much 
favor'd as we have neither Arms or Accoutrements. We can only evince 
our wish for them, by our Zeal in compleating the Corps. 

I put this in at Dereham to save a Post 

I am. Dear Sir, 

Very much Yrs. 

JAS. JONES. 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart. 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 5 1 



Fakenham. 

Sep. 4th 1794 
Dear Sir, 

I put a letter into the Post Box at Dereham yesterday on my return 
from Hingham with Mrs Jones and my daughter, to save a day's post ; 
and when I reached Home, found your obliging Favor of the 31st ulto, 
which does me a great deal of honor. I submit to your kind wishes 
towards me provided no Gentleman of Rank^ superior to my own self, 
should like to come forward, and your partial Proposal in my favor, should 
meet with the cheerful concurrance of the Marquis Townshend, and the 
Approbation of the Corps. To serve under your command, and in your 
Troop, will be the highest satisfaction to me and which I shall willing do 
as a private, should the smallest Obstacle occur to obstruct that distinction 
you are inclined to propose. 

In 1782 my Name was to have had the honor of accompanying yours, 
as Officer in Lady Townshends Corps, and I wish that distinction could 
still be preserved although we should be the 2nd Troop — but this I submit 
with great defTerence to you. 

In 1762 I had the great good fortune to bear His Majesty's Commission 
as Apothecary to the Forces in Germany ; which put me upon a Line with 
a Captain in the Army, respecting Quarters etc yet having neither military 
Command or knowledge, I do not assume upon it — and shall think a 
private Station in so good a Cause a Post of Honor You'll excuse my 
dwelling so long on what seems to relate chiefly to myself— but the recollection 
of past times will occur and often lead us astray your kind intention 
towards us on Sunday last — we must acknowledge with respect and hope 
the Heavens will prove more propitious on Sunday next when I shall hope 
for the favor of seeing you either to eat Mutton in the plain Family way at 
\ past I o clock, or a Chop at any hour you please — in a Soldier like way 
hot & hot. Your black Crop Belt appearing amongst us, will I hope 
reprieve it, as I freely own it appears to me, best adapted to our particular 
Service, — in every respect. Mr. Stokes has been requested to write to 
Mr Kerrison for Copies of the Resolution of the Committee, respecting the 
Sabres &c and a Book will be prepared to Enter the Resolutions of the 
Corps. Could you have your Volunteers from Docking, meet you here on 
Sunday — they might sign the muster Roll which will I hope be completed 
on that Day, and it may then be transmitted to the Lord Lieutenant — to 
forward the Purposes of the Association without delay. 

I shall enclose a list which my son transcribed from Mr Cole's Book — 
by which I appear not to have fulfilled my engagement — having brought 
forward only one — but as my son came Voluntarily into the Corps — afterwards 



5 2 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 794. 



I shall mount three — and call on the Subscription to assist one only — which 
I begged Mr Shearing to explain to the Marquis Townshend — but if you 
would kindly hint it I should think it would be better, than to come from 
myself. 

The Resolutions of the Meeting you did us the honor to attend — will 
be entered in the Book against Sunday next 

I am, with great respect 

Your obliged and Obedient Servant 

JAMES JONES. 
Sir M. B. Folkes, Bart 



In the Norwich Mercury, of September 27th, I794i 't states: — 

" On Saturday last the Marquis Townshend, Sir Ma rtin Browne Folkes 
Bart, Wm Mason, and Edward Parry Esqrs, reviewed the corps of Yeomanry 
Rangers at Rainham, who appeared in general a very fine body of men. 
The weather was so bad as to admit of very few evolutions, and they were 
afterwards entertained at Rainham by his Lordship." 



On the same date, it also relates : — 

" Wednesday last the colours of the Hon. Colonel Harbord's Regiment 
of Norfolk Light Dragoons were consecrated at St James' Chapel in Bury, 
in due form. Upon which occasion this fine body of men went through 
their evolutions greatly to the satisfaction of their officers, by whom they 
were entertained at the difTerent inns. An elegant dinner was given by 
the colonel to the corporation, and the gentlemen of the town and neighbour- 
hood, and the festivities of the day were concluded by a ball in the evening. 
At the ceremony of presenting the standards of the Hon. Col. Harbord's 
Regiment of Norfolk Light Dragoons at Bury, the following distinguished 
personages attended ; viz. Lord and Lady Suffield, Lord and Lady Belgrave, 
Sir Edward Astley Bart, and Lady Caroline Harbord, with some of the 
first characters in the neighbourhood. The Royal Standard was presented 
to the Regiment by Sir Edward, and the provincial ones by Lady Suffield 
and Lady Caroline/' 

The correspondent of the above newspaper has been misinformed as to 
the correct title of Colonel Harbord's corps ; in no army list of the period 
is it described other than The Norfolk Fencible Cavalry. As to the future 
fate of these standards, I shall have occasion to refer later on, when the 
disbandment of the corps took place. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ I794- 53 



On the same date, the same newspaper relates : — 

''On Sunday last the first troop of Clackclose Cavalry, composed of 
the gentlemen and yeomanry of the hundred, mustered at Downham early 
in the morning, and with their officers marched to church, where an excellent 
sermon suitable to the occasion was preached by the Revd Jas. Dashwood . 
A. M. 

"After service, the troops dined, by invitation, with their officers at 
the Swan, where an elegant dinner was provided ; when dinner was over 
the band played, and the room resounded with the general chorus of ' God 
save the King/ ' Rule Britannia,' etc ; and in the evening the troop paraded 
through the town and neighbourhood. 

"The day was passed with most perfect good humour and unanimity, 
and the appearance and discipline of the troop reflects great credit on them- 
selves and their officera" 



Langton House, 

Near Brentwood. 
6th October 1794. 
Dear Sir, 

I have just receiv'd the enclosed from our friend Mr. Parry — 
I have wrote to him that I am sorry I had before sent the Duke of Portland 
my recommendation of our Corps and officers, wishing to loose no time for 
it's formation, and that I have received no answer from His Grace — Upon 
Captain Beauchamp's acceptance of a Commission, I had recommended 
him for one of the Troops, yourself for another, and Mr Mason and your 
son for Lieutenant — As you express'd a wish for no high Commission, and 
also obligingly allow'd me to recommend your Son for a Lieutenancy, tho 
his attendance could not be expected. 

I wou'd not otherwise presume to consult you whether it wou'd be 
agreable to you to take his Lieutenancy or allow me to propose your 
Son's to Mr Parry, whom at his age you was so good as to allow me 
to recommend for the completion of the Corps. Your rank entitles you 
to the preference and it entirely depends on yourself — I remain still uncertain 
whether His Majesty will approve of my becoming the Field Officer, if 
not there can be no difficulty, as Captain Beauchamp an Officer of experience 
who has serv'd in the Queens Dragoon Guards may have it and then Mr. 
Parry be second Captain. 

I met Mr Windham and Mr Pelham yesterday at Brentwood on their 



54 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



return from Holland, I had only a few minutes conversation with them, 
and told them I should not cross examine them, Windham look'd in very 
good spirits; I unluckily requested him to desire the Duke of Portland to 
forward our Rangers Commissions as soon as possible. 

Lady Townshend and my family join me in best wishes to you and 
yours. 

I remain, 

With truest r^ard, Dear Sir, 
Yours faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart. 



Rainham. 

October 7th 1794. 

Sir, 

Agreeably with your wishes I enclose a List of the Corps of 

Rangers and the Articles under which they enrolled. I have struck a line 

under the names of those who will require to be allow'd for their Cloathing 

etc, etc. The Cloaks you will be pleased to order as settled at the meeting 

at Fakenham, — Cross Belts, Swords, and Pistols will be wanted for the 

whole Corps, the two latter I imagine may be had of Mr. Gill of Birmingham, 

who must be paid out of the County Subscription what his charge exceeds 

Government allowance, and the Corps will be glad to be properly equipt 

as soon as possible. The saddles and Bridles, the Sadler at Fakenham 

(who is one of the Corps) will furnish on the same terms as settled for the 

other Corps, which if you will please to trouble yourself to enquire about 

and let us know we shall be glad. We shall want a Horse for the 

Sergeant and shall be glad to know how he is to be subsisted, at present 

he has had money from me, and Boards at the Inn here 

I hope you will receive this in proper time for the Meeting, and if you 

should have any further inquiries to make or directions to give that I shall 

receive your Commands. 

I am Sir, 

With perfect respect, 

Your most obedient and humble servant, 

M. SHEARING. 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1794. 55 



Articles of Enrolment 

FOR THE 

Proposed Corps 

OF 

Norfolk Yeomanry and Rangers. 

We whose Names are hereunto subscribed, being Inhabitants in and near the 
Hundred of Gallow, in the County of Norfolk, do, under the Authority of an 
Act of Parliament entitled — ** An Act for the Encouragement and Disciplining 
of such Corps or Companies of Men as shall voluntarily Enrol themselves for 
the Defence of their Towns or Coasts, or for the general Defence of the King- 
dom during the present War, voluntarily enrol ourselves to form a Corps of 
Cavalry to be called, The NORFOLK RANGERS, to act within the County for 
its internal Defence and the Security of its Coasts against Invasion, and for 
the Maintenance and Preservation of good Order and Government therein, 
upon the following Terms and Conditions : 

First We agree to attend personally mounted on serviceable Geldings or 
Mares, to be provided and maintained at the Expense of each Subscriber, and 
to be approved of by the Commanding Officer of the Corps, for the Purpose of 
Training and Exercise, at such Times and Places as shall be fixed by such 
Commanding Officer, with the Approbation of the Lord Lieutenant of the 
County. 

Second. During the Times of Exercise, and when called out and embodied, 
we agree to wear such uniform Coats, Waistcoats, Breeches, Boots, and Hats or 
Caps, as shall be appointed by the Lord Lieutenant of the County, and to be 
provided at our own Expense. 

Third. That proper Arms, Accoutrements, and Cloaks, with uniform 
Saddles and Bridles complete, be furnished by Grovernment, except as to such 
Subscribers as shall chuse to provide them at their own Expense. 

Fourth. That we will be subject to be Embodied by Order of His Majesty, 
signified to us by the Lord Lieutenant, or by the Sheriff of the County, and to 
march and act within the County for its internal Defence and Security against 
Invasion, and for the Suppression of Riots and Tumults, and the Preservation 
of good Order and Government therein. 

Fifth. That we will, when so embodied and called out into actual Service, 
be subject to Military Discipline in the same Manner as His Majesty's Regular 
Forces and the Militia : and that we will, not only during the Times of Train- 
ing and Exercise, but also when embodied and in actual Service, maintain our- 
selves and our Horses without receiving any Pay from Government or 
otherwise. 



56 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 

Sixth. That each Troop shall consist of not less than Fifty Men, including 
the Officers, and shall be under the particular Command of the Officers 
belonging to it, during the Time of its Training and Exercise ; but the whole 
Corps to be under the general Superintendence and Command of the Field 
Officers — and if there are Six or more Troops, Three Field Officers to be 
appointed : if Four Troops, Two Field Officers ; and if only Two Troops, one 
Field Officer to be appointed. 

Seventh. That the Officers shall receive Commissions from His Majesty, or 
from the Lord Lieutenant of the County, and we submit the Nomination of 
our Officers to the Lord Lieutenant 

And as several of the Subscribers, as well as other Persons resident in or 
near the said Hundred, may be desirous to provide Men to join this Corps, and 
to serve either as Cavalry or Infantry — Therefore 

Eighth. We agree that any Subscribers, or other Person Resident as afore- 
said, may recommend Men to join this Corps, to serve either as Cavalry or 
Infantry, and in the former Case the Persons recommending such Men for 
Cavalry to furnish them with Horses at their own expense ; but no Man so 
recbmmended shall be accepted to serve in the Cavalry, unless with the Consent 
of a Majority of the Corps and the Lord Lieutenant ; nor in the Infantry 
without the Approbation of the Lord Lieutenant or Commanding Officer. 

Ninth. That such Men so recommended and accepted to serve shall be 
provided with the uniform Coats, Waistcoats, Breeches, Boots, and Hats or 
Caps, Arms, and Accoutrements and the Cavalry with Uniform Saddles and 
Bridles, at the Expense of the County Subscription or by the Allowance from 
Government, unless the Persons so recommending chuse to provide all or any 
part thereof, at their own Expense ; and that the Men so recommended by 
Persons who are not Subscribers and accepted to serve as Cavalry, shall be 
maintained at the Expense of the Persons recommending them in the same 
Manner as the Subscribers are to maintain themselves and that the Infantry, 
and also the Men so recommended by Subscribers as Cavalry, shall, during the 
Times of Training and Exercise, be allowed Pay at Two Shillings per Day 
from the County Subscription, and when embodied and in actual service, to 
receive Pay from Government ; and in all other Respects the Cavalry and 
Infantry so recommended and accepted shall be subject to the same Terms 
and Conditions as the Subscribers themselves are subject to. 

Tenth. That all Uniform Coats, Waistcoats, Breeches, Boots, and Hats or 
Caps, Arms, Accoutrements, Cloaks, Saddles, and Bridles, provided at the 
Expense of Government or of the County Subscription, shall be properly 
taken care of by the Persons by whom the same shall be received, and the 
same shall be delivered up when required to the Commanding Oi&cer, or to 
such Person or Persons as shall, by Order of His Majesty, or the Lord 
Lieutenant, be commissioned to receive the same. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



57 



George, Marquis Townshend 
Sr Martin Browne Folkes Bart 
Capt George Beauchamp 
Wm. Mason Esqr 
Folkes Esqr. 



John Green 
Wm Goodwyn 
J no Anthony 

Jno Gibbs 
Thos Cony 
Mark Gunton 
John Arminger 
Wm Seppings 
Robt Drosier 
G. D. Graver 
Wm Money Hill 

Wm Stokes 
G. C. Graver 
Edmd Stedman 
Robt Ward 
John Savory 
Edwd Rudge 
Robt Cole 
Thomas Case 
Chrr. Stangroom 
Wm Jarrett 
John Wrench 
J as Buck 
Wm. Buck 
Dennis Howard 
Robt. Billing 
Wm. Garrett 
Money Raven 
Thos. Webb 
Matt. Fowle 



Edwd. Drosier 
Jas. Hare 
Jas Jones 

John Shearing 
J. Jones Junr 

Geo. Druery 

Richd. Gay 
Thos. Diging s 

Wm. Godfrey 
Thos. Seppings 
Chas. Money 

John Whiteman 

James Barnes 

John Kenny 

Thomas Flatten 

Frs. Blanchflower 

Chas. White 

Jas. Liver 

Thos. Osbaston 

Jacob Bamston 

Geo> Gunton 

Nichs. Norman 

Wm. Doughty 

Frs. Smith 

Richd. Girling 

Jna Large 

John Rathbone 

Robt. Cornish 

Wm. Buck 

Barnd. B. BIyth 

Thos. Seppings Junr. 



Officers 



Richd. Overton 
Wm. Green Junr. 
Geo. Gunton 
Thos. Savory 
Henry Readwin 

Charles Sinkler 

John Cooper 
H. C. Frost 

Edwd. Symonds 
Thos Digings 
Thos. Groodwin 

Thos. Stringer 

Thos. M. Waller 

Hugh Dade 

John Stibbard 

Wm. Wright" " 

Jonas Wright 

John Ward 

Jas Herring 

Wm. Savage 

Richd. Mayes 

Gil bert Daniel 

Wm. Harper 

Abel Breet 

John Richard 

John Barnston 

Wm. Langman 

Robt Greengrass 

Edwd. Gutteridge 

Geo. Walker f^ 

H Sergeants 



Kittle 






Thos. Newell 

N.B.-— All those with the line drawn under their Names will require their 



58 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



Cloathmg, Boots, Hats &c, Saddles, Bridles and Accoutrements, the No I 
think 41 to be pd out of the County Subscription and Government 



Langton House, 

Near Brentwood. 

14th October 1794. 
Dear Sir, 

I found by the Gazette that His Majesty has approved of our 
Corps. The observations of the time are the rapid promotion of Children 
in the Military Line» I expect some Strictures upon an old Gentleman of 
70 being appointed Major. 

I am much oblig'd to you for your attention to our Arms etc and also 
to the proceedings of the Committee at Norwich. I inclose you the Duke 
of Portlands answer to my letter, which I will thank you to return when 
convenient I have a Lad here instructing as a Trumpeter for our Corps, 
who is making a good prepress, and I shall soon send him for your 
directions. 

As soon as I have Mr Parry's answer you shall hear from me. 
The Dutch pass us from Holland in Shoals all accounts from the 
Continent are very gloomy, & we are likely to be soon much annoyed 
on our Coast 

Lady Townshend and family join me in best wishes to you and yours. 
I have no guess when our Corps will break up. 

I remain, 

with truest regard, 

Yours faithfully, 

TOWNSHEND. 
P.S. — A pattern of the Clasps will be sent very soon. 
Sir M. B. Folkes. Bart 



Fakenham. 

Oct: 27th 1794 
Sir, 

Agreeable to your letter of the loth inst., I defer*d geting any 
more Cloaks made until I had shew'd the Gentlemen the Cloak that Mr 
Reynolds sent to Mr Money Hill, but neither Mr Mason nor any of the 
Gentlemen approved of it, as they thought it more like a Watchmans Coat 
than a Military Cloak. I have sent you Cloaks of different lengths which 
are approved of by Mr Mason and all the Gentlemen, and they desir'd 
that they might be sent to you for your approbation. If you approve of 
them should esteem it a favor to give me a line by the post as I am to 



\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 59 



wait for your answer, before I get any more Cloaks made. Annexed is 
the lowest price that I can make them for. 

I am Sir, 

Your hble. Sert, 

ROBt COLE 

The price of the longest Cloak — 

5] yds 6/4 Blue Cloth 5/6 — ... ... ... i 11 ^\ 

4 yds Buff Serge aid ... ... ... ... 7 

Clasps hooks & Eyes Batts 

thd &c ... ... ... ... ... I i^ 

nftSLKUlg ... ••• .•• ... *•• 2 3 



;f a a o 



The short Cloak 3/- less ... ... ... £\ 19 o 

F.S. Mr Mason & Mr Shearing woud be oblig'dy if you shou'd think 
proper to give an order to some person to purchase a Horse for 
G. Walker our Drill Sergt. as he have only a Grey Hobby of the Marquis 
Townshend. Quarter Master Robertson at Norwich have two or three 
Horses to dispose of— 



A quarter-master was allowed to each troop of Yeomanry, and unless 
returned as an officer was not mounted. Among his duties, were, to give 
instruction to the men, how to keep their clothes and accoutrements in 
perfect order, and, when ordered out on service, he had to arrange for 
the billets of the troop. 

Norwich Mercury^ Nov. ist, 1794, states that The Hon. Col. Harbord's 
regiment of Light Dragoons, marched on Monday last from Bury, 
Stowmarket, and Thetford for their winter quarters at Lynn, Wisbeach, 
Swaffham, and Downham." 

This is, of course, the Norfolk Fencible Cavalry before referred to. 

The newspaper goes on to state that ''The Yeomanry desirous of 
forming themselves into a troop of Cavalry of the neighbouring parishes, 
viz, Costessey, Honingham, Whitchingham, Ringland, Taverham, Horsford, 
Morton, Attlebridge, Weston, Drayton, etc etc are requested to meet 
Charles Laton and Edward Jerningham Esqrs at the Bull in Attlebridge 
on Friday next Nov 7th at 12 o clock. Those gentlemen of the afore- 
mentioned neighbourhood approving the Army of Yeomanry, are solicited, 
as soon as possible, to make known their sentiments to their tenants etc. 



6o 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



Hillington Hall, 

Nov. 12, 1794. 

Sir, 

I am just informed the Committee think that Lord Townshend's 

Corps of Rangers do not mean to accept of any thing from the 
Subscription, which is not consistent with their Resolution for me to order 
a hundred Sabres. It is certainly true that the Yeomanry do not mean to 
take any thing for their clothing, Saddles, etc, etc., but they certainly 
expect to be allowed in the proportion ot £12 s, man for what may be 
provided for those they may have recommended to join the Corps. But 
I did not suppose they would have taken any thing for their A^ys of 
exercise etc., etc. It is possible therefore that I may have been mis- 
understood, or that I may not have properly explained myself. However, 
Lord Townshend, Capt Beauchamp and myself have just determined that 
the Rangers shall be placed exactly upon the same footing as the other 
Corps and I take the earliest opportunity of giving you this information, 
as it is not improbable but before long I may have occasion to draw 
upon you. 

I am Sir, 

Yours etc, 

M. B. FOLKES. 
To 
Roger Kerrison Esq. 

A List of the Norfolk Rangers. 



I 


W. M. Hill & 2 


17 


Robt Billing 


2 


John Brett 


18 


Wm. Garrett 


3 


Wm. Stokes & i 


19 


Money Raven 


4 


G. C. Graver 


20 


John Green 


5 


Edmd. Stedman & i 


21 


Wm. Goodwin 


6 


Robt. Ward 


22 


John Anthony 


7 


John Savory 


23 


John Gibbs 


8 


Edwd. Rudge 


24 


Thos. Cony & i 


9 


Robt. Cole & I 


25 


Thos. Webb 


10 


Thos. Case & i 


26 


Mathw. Fowl 


II 


Christr. Stangroom & 1 


27 


Thos. Newell 


12 


Wm. Jarrett Junr. & i 


28 


Edwrd. Drosier & 2 


13 


Jereh. Wrench & i 


29 


Jas. Hare 


14 


James Buck and i 


30 


Jas. Jones & 2 


IS 


Wm. Buck Junr 


31 


John Shearing 


16 


Dennis Howard 


32 


Jas. Jones Junr 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 794. 



61 



33 


Geo. Drury 


54 


Geo. Gunton 


34 


Mark Gunton 


55 


N. Norman 


35 


John Armiger 


56 


Wm. Doughty 


36 


Wm. Seppings 


57 


Francs. Smith 


37 


Robt. Drosier 


58 


Richd. Girling 


38 


G. D. Graver 


59 


John Large 


39 


Thos. Digings 


60 


John Rathbone 


40 


Sir M. B. Folkes & 50 


61 


Robt Cornish 


41 


Wm. Godfrey 


62 


Wm. Buck 


42 


Thos. Seppings 


63 


Bams. B. Blythe 


43 


Chas. Money & i 


64 


Thos. Seppings Junr 


44 


John Whiteman & i 


65 


Richd. Overton 


45 


Jas. Barnes 


66 


Wm. Green Junr 


46 


John Renny 


67 


F. Savory 


47 


Thos. Flatten 


68 


Hugh Dade 


48 


Francs. Bianchflower 


69 


Henry Readwin 


49 


Richd. Gay 


70 


Wm. Readwin 


50 


Chas. White 


71 


Wm. Langman 


51 


Jas. Lever 


72 


Francis Taylor 


52 


Thos. Osbaston 


73 


Wm. Houghton 


53 


Jacob Bamston 


74 


Geo. Gunton Junr 




Men Nominated & Approved 


I 
2 


It"" f"*"^! '"^ \ for Mr Hill 
Wm. Wright ) 


7 
8 


Richd. Mays ) ,, -^ 

G. Daniel } ^ ^'«"*^ 


3 


Jonas Wright for Mr Stokes 


9 


Wm. Harper for Mr Stedman 


4 


John Ward for Mr Cole 


10 


Abel Brett for Mr Case 


5 


Jas. Herring for Mr Jones 


II 


John Richard 


6 


Wm. Savage for Mr Brett 


12 


John Barnston 


A 1 


ist of Persons in the Norfolk 


Rangers 


who do not find themselves 


with Cloaths etc. etc. 






John Ward 




Richard Gay 


Francis Bianchflower 




Francis Smith 


Thomas Flatten 




William Langman 


George Drury 




William Doughty 


John Kenny 




G. Daniel 


George Gunton 




Henry Readwin 


Charles White 




George Gunton Junr 


James Herring 




George Greengrass 


William Hooper 




John Richard 



62 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1794. 

Robinson Cornish John Rathbone 

John Arminger James Baraes 

Richard Mayo James Lever 

Richard Dallaston Thomas Osbaston 

Francis Taylor Jacob Barnston 

Abell Brett Thomas Goodwyn 

John Large George Walker Drill Serg 

John Barnston Thomas Stringer 

Mark Gunton Jonas Wright 

36 

Fakenham, 

December 9th 1794. 
Sir, 

Annexed I have sent you all the Persons names that I know of 
at present who do not find their own Cloaths etc etc 

I am Sir, 

Your humble Servant 

M. B. Folkes 
To Sir M. B. Folkes Bart, 
The original sent to George Beauchamp Esq. 



This ends the series of letters relating to the raising of the Norfolk 
Rangers, but their history does not end here by any means, and I shall 
have occasion to draw my readers' attention to them on many future 
occasions and for many years. It will not be out of place at this period 
to give The Rangers' song, which was always sung at all their gather- 
ings of a festive nature. 

Norwich Mercury^ July 12th, 1794. 
LOYAL SONG. 

THE RECRUITING RANGER OP 1782 REVIVED IN I794. 

Tune — " Hearts of oak, &c." 

Come, come Volunteers to our standard repair, 
Tis Townshend commands us, be strangers to fear; 
Tis Glory invites ye, then who can resist, 
So noble the cause for which we enlist. 

Chorus. 
For Rangers we are, and Rangers we'll be; 
We'll ever be steady — and ready, boys, ready 
To defend Norfolk's coast like men that are free. 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 794. 63 



Whilst Walpole and Wodehouse and such men as these, 
Bid defiance to danger, regardless of ease, 
Shall we not take arms, and partake in the toil. 
When braved by the foe, to protect our own Isle, 
Chorus. For Rangers &c. 

The Lynn loyal youths so much zeal have shewn, 
They honor their county as well as their town; 
Their example so bright, it inspires the brave 
To join hearts and hands their country to save. 

Chorus. 
For Britons we are, and Britons we'll be; 
We'll ever be steady — united and ready, 
And convince the whole world that Britons are free. 

We'll join them my lads, Folkes & Dillingham too, 
Windham and Parry, and all that are true 
To their King, Constitution, Liberty, Laws, 
Resolved to defend them, or die in the cause. 
Chorus. For Britons &c. 

Should the French e'er attempt to invade Englands coast, 
May we fight like Comwallis so justly our boast. 
And like gallant Howe, whose deeds we revere. 
For gaining us time, thus ourselves to prepare. 
Chorus. For Britons &c. 

All true Volunteers, should the enemy land. 
Will form as one corps, and join sword in hand; 
When Britons unite, and discord must cease. 
And grim visaged war soon become smiling peace. 
Chorus. For Britons &c. 

At the latter end of 1794 there were rumours of the commencement 
of that unrest among the lower orders in Norfolk which in later years was 
a source of great anxiety to the local authorities, and which afterwards 
was the principal cause of the retention of the Yeomanry forces in the 
county, as without them the local authorities would never have been 
able to cope with the rioters, for at this period the county police did not 
exist even in name. I find that Mr. Robert John Buxton, of Shadwell 
Lodge, reported meetings held at Thetford in reference to the high price 
of provisions, and of the interruption of the com trade and an incursion 
on bakers' shops. Hearing that further assemblies were contemplated he 
asked that assistance might be sent to him from the military stationed at 
Norwich. 



64 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavairy of Norfolk^ 1 794. 



It was also during this year that Major-Greneral Money commenced 
his series of letters as to the defence of the county. He resided at Crown 
Point, near Norwich, and had entered the French service as a volunteer 
in 1792, and had held high command in the field until the entry of England 
into war compelled him to resign it. He pointed out that in England, 
the most strongly enclosed country in the world, there were forty thousand 
cavalry, of which not a single troop was properly armed or trained for 
dismounted duty ; and it is a positive fact that only twelve carbines were 
issued to each troop of Fencibles. ** Is there,*' asked Money, '' between 
London and Ipswich any ground on which three squadrons of horse can 
form without being in reach of musketeers from the hedgerows in their 
front and flank 7 Of what use then, in God's name, is cavalry when they 
cannot form to charge ? for if they cannot form they cannot charge." He 
quoted the success and efficiency of the French mounted chasseurs in Italy 
and in other campaigns, and pleaded with great eloquence and force for 
introduction of similar corps in England ; but he was not sanguine of 
success. ''Till this new system of horse chasseurs t>e adopted by Austria 
and Prussia, whom we copy in most things, and have copied for a century 
past, nothing will be done." Such was his prediction, and the subject was 
evidently the result of a study by a very practical mind. 

There are no lists of officers at the War Office until 1794, which refer 
to the Yeomanry Cavalry. 

The various returns sent in there vary in detail. They appear to have 
been furnished in a very desultory and haphazard fashion, and apparently 
at the option of the various commanders of the independent troops during 
the several periods of the history of the force. Sometimes the dates of 
the commissions are given, at other times they are not ; but by comparing 
them with the printed lists which appeared in official Army Lists of the 
period, and many of which are extant and in the possession of the author, 
practically a full list has been compiled for this book from 1794 to 1905. 

At the end of each year, I will give the list of officers as they appear in 
the official lists. For the year 1794, they are as under : — 

Norfolk Gentlemen and Yeomanry. 





HINGHAM CORPS 




Captain 


B. Gurdon Dillingham 


23 June 1794 


Lieutenant 


Hammond Alpe 


• 

II II *> 


Cornet 


James Murray 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


II •• II 


Major corns 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


Thomas Hare 


7 June „ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1794-5. 65 



Captain 


George Beauchamp 


29 Sept 


1794 


1) 


Sir Martin B. Polices Bt 


29 Sept 


»» 


)» 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 


»} 


Lieut 


Thomas Berners Flestow 


7 June 


» 


>i 


William Mason 


29 Sept 


It 


•> 


Edward Parry 


30 Oct 


II 


» 


William Carpenter 


9 Dec 


91 


Cornet 


George William Manby 


7 June 


II 


M 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 

EAST DEREHAM CORPS 


9 Dec 


II 


Captain 


Thomas Wodehouse 


30 Oct 


1794 


Lieut. 


Christopher Girling 


» » 


>» 


Cornet 


John Hyde 


i> » 


91 



179s. 

Norwich Mercury^ Jan. loth, 1795. 

"On Wednesday the 24th of December 1794* the troop of Cavalry 
consisting of the gentlemen and yeomen of the Hundred and Half Hundred 
of Clackclose, in this county, received their elegant Standard the gift of the 
Lady Patroness of the corps. The ceremony was as follows : 

" At noon the troop, which consists of 70 men, marched from Downham to 
the exercising field, where a detachment from Colonel Harbord's regiment of 
Norfolk Light Dragoons had previously been stationed to keep the ground. 
The day was extremely unfavourable, being a very hard frost, attended with 
a very strong Easterly wind, nevertheless, soon after twelve, the company 
flocked in from all quarters, and it appeared that the whole Hundred was 
present, which evinces in a strong degree their approbation of the institution. 
The carriages were stationed in a line parallel with the front of the troop, in 
the centre was the carriage of the lady who, on the part of the Lady 
Patroness, was to present the Standard ; she was attended by two ladies, in 
uniform, as Aid-de-camps on the occasion, and the band of music belonging 
to the troop. Captain Smith of the Norfolk Light Dragoons, with other 
officers of the same regiment, very obligingly attended ; the former took 
his station as a Reviewing Officer; The troop then passed in review in 
squadron and in file; the horse evolutions then foUowied — they charged, 
dispersed and fired their pistols, and rallied by sound of trumpet. The troop 
then marched up to the line of carriages, when the ceremony of presenting the 
standard commenced. The ladies alighted from their carriages, and the 
standard being delivered to the lady to present, she in a very elegant manner 
presented it to the Captain and he conveyed it to the Guidon of the troop, who 
with the right and lisft files, front and rear, and the Covering Sergeant had 



66 The Records of the Veofnanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 795- 



advanced to receive it As soon as the Standard was mounted, this 
detachment went to the left about and moving along the line of the troop, 
passed between the ranks, and took its station in the centre of the line ; the 
band then played 'God save the King/ the trumpets flourished, the officers 
saluted, and the troops rising in their stirups, brandished their swords in the 
air, and gave three cheers. The Captain, Ladies and company, then entered 
the circle formed by the troop, when the ceremony of the consecration of the 
standard took place ; it consisted of a most pertinent address to the troop, and 
a prayer, or solemn appeal to the Almighty to bless the standard and to grant 
success and victory to the troop in the cause of their King, Constitution, their 
religion, and the laws of the realm. This ceremony over, the lines of squadron 
was formed again, the ladies were reconducted to their carriages, and the 
troops marched back to Downham, and lodged the standard. The troop of 
the gentlemen of the county dined at the Swan, the band belonging to the 
corps played during the repast ; and the evening concluded with a play at the 
Theatre, where the 'Battle of Hcxam' and 'Sprigs of Laurel,' were 
performed." 

Norwich Mercury ^ June 13th, 1795. 

"At East Dereham his Majestys birth-day was observed with great 
demonstrations of joy. The troop of Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry 
met on a heath near the town at ten o'clock, where the new standard was 
presented by Mrs Bagge, and received by the troop with their sabres drawn, 
with three cheers, in a manner that did credit to that excellent institution ; 
after which they proceeded in order to Church, where a sermon on the occasion 
was preached by the Rev St John Priest of Seaming, Chaplain to the troop, 
(60th Psalm, 4th verse, Bible translation) ; after which they fired several 
excellent voUies in the market-place, in honour of the day that gave birth to 
our Illustrious Monarch ; they then retired to the George Inn, where the whole 
troop and a great number of respectable gentlemen dined together, and spent 
the remainder of the day with loyalty to their King and attachment to the 
Constitution. In the evening there was a very genteel assembly." 

On August 15th, it also announces that "the Biofield and Loddon troops 
of Yeomanry Cavalry met on Lingwood Common, when Mrs Burroughes the 
lady patroness, presented them with the colours of the troop, which were 
received with the usual ceremonies, and consecrated by the Rev. Mr. Denison, 
who pronounced an apposite oration on the occasion. During the time of the 
troops being on the ground the Marquis and Marchioness arrived, and they 
had the honour of being reviewed by the Marquis, who expressed an 
uncommon degree of satisfaction at their regularity and military appearance* 
The party adjourned to Panxworth, where they partook of a very plentiful 



Standard of thk Blofield and South Walshau Troop or Norfolk Yeomanry 
Cavalry, 1795. 
I* ttufctMt^H 0/ R. anrrmtgh*t, 0/ BurUHgham, Norfolk. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 795. 67 



dinner. Several gentlemen performed the part of a military band, which 
rendered the scene peculiarly festive. Many loyal songs were sung and 
constitutional toasts drunk, and the day concluded with the utmost 
harmony." 

On October 17th, there is another paragraph, which says : — " The Marquis 
Townshend and General Johnston reviewed the corps of Lynn Loyal 
Volunteers, commanded by Major Everard, and the Clackclose Troop of 
Yeomanry, commanded by Captain Hare ; and expressed the greatest 
satisfaction at their appearance and manoeuvres, particularly of the Cavalry, 
which were executed with great rapidity and exactness." 

We now come across another account of riots in the county of Norfolk in 
connection with the price of flour. The Norfolk Chronicle relates that " in 
the second week of December, 1795, wheat was quoted at Norwich corn-market 
at from 90/- to 104/- per quarter. The dearness of bread exasperated the 
populace, and throughout the county oi^anised mobs endeavoured to stop the 
exportation of flour to the Metropolis. At Wells the Pembroke Militia were 
called out to guard the vessel which had been commissioned to convey Norfolk 
flour to the London market, and Mr Coke, of Holkham, was at his wits end to 
pacify the exasperated people, and to prevent the bloodshed which must have 
resulted from collision with the military. A similar tumult occurred at Holt, 
on December 21st, when an effort was made by the rioters to prevent the 
carrying of flour to the port of Lynn. The magistrates adopted efi*ective 
measures to quell the disturbance. Mr Jodrell, of Bayfield, and Mr Collyer, 
summoned the neighbouring gentry and farmers to Holt, and one hundred of 
them, well-mounted, assembled in the Market-place, and acted as a convoy to 
the waggons on their passage through the hundred. On the following day, 
these gentlemen banded themselves into an association, and subscribed to the 
following terms: — 'We, the Loyal Holt Association, whose names are 
underwritten, hereby pledge ourselves that in case of any tumult or 
disturbance of the public peace, we will instantly come forward in our persons 
to assist the civil power in the due execution of the law, each man mounted on 
horseback with his stafi*.'" 

The Norfolk Chronicle remarked that "this plan seems well calculated 
to suppress civil commotion, and to preserve the public peace, is adopting the 
constitutional authority of the posse comitatus, and reflects the highest credit 
on the worthy magistrates who proposed it Each associator is to receive 
a staff from the high constable with a device emblematic of the association. 
We are happy to find that several respectable clergymen have joined the above 
association with the spirit that becomes them." 

On the 6th of October, 1796, a new Parliament had been opened by the 
King ; and on the i8th Pitt brought forward his measures for meeting the 



68 The Records of the Yeontanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1795-6. 



threatened invasion. The first was an Act for levying fifteen thousand men 
from parish to parish to recruit the Navy and the troops of the line ; the 
maritime counties being assigned to the Fleet and the inland coqnties to 
the Army. For the formation of this levy the parochial authorities were 
empowered to pay a stated bounty to the so-called volunteers, who should 
come forward as recruits ; a method which, though frequently employed before 
|» obtain men for the Navy, had not for many years been used for the Army. 
But the fact was that the Government had exhausted the supply of recruits. 
Eighty thousand had been enlisted in 1794 and 1795, most of whom had been 
buried or broken down for life in the West Indies, and there was no anxiety 
either in England or Ireland to share their fate. 

The second measure was an Act for the gradual levy by ballot of a 
Supplementary Militia of sixty thousand men, according to a fixed quota for 
each county. Substitutes were allowed, and encouragement was given for 
volunteers to come forward and save their district from the ballot ; and it was 
intended that this levy should be called out in fractions of one-sixth, until the 
^ole had passed, in succession, through twenty days' training. To this there 
was added a further force called the Provisional Cavalry ; owners of horses 
kept for riding or carriages being required to provide one trooper and horse for 
every ten such horses, while those that possessed fewer than ten were lumped 
together to provide their horsemen jointly. This Provisional Cavalry was 
entitled to pay if embodied, and was reckoned to comprise fifteen thousand 
men.* 

1796. 

In 1795 and 1796, however, but few additional troops were formed, and 
the need of mounted men being still urgent, as we have seen by the riots which 
took place lately in the county; also to meet the expected invasion — for 
according to the Quarter-Master-General of the Forces, there *' never was a 
time when the discontented and worthless of this island were so numerous, 
and so ready from the infatuation of the times to give the enemy every 
assistance.'' 

It is probable that the Act before mentioned was very unpopular with 
horse-owners, great and small ; be that as it may, only seven weeks had elapsed 
before an Amending Act received the Royal assent This enacted that where 
in any county or subdivision of a county a number should be raised under the 
Act of 1794, amounting to or exceeding three-fourths of the whole number 
entitled to be raised under the Provisional Cavalry Act, then the Lord and 
Deputy Lieutenants had power to dispense with the Provisional Cavalry and 
to substitute Yeomanry Cavalry. 

* FortMCoe, *' Histoiy of the Brilish Anny," IV, 522. 



The Mecords of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 796. 69 



This gave, as Was intended, d great stimulus to recruiting fof the 
Yeomanry. Many additional lotal troops were enrolled during the following 
years, and existing ottes were strengthened, whereby at the end of 1798 the 
force amounted to some eleven thousand men, perhaps more ; not near enough 
however, to do away with the Provisional Cavalry, who, when embodied hi 
six counties between 1797 ahd 1800, were reckoned at fifteen thousand men for 
them alone. To this force of Provisional Cavalry, Norfolk contributed 337 
men. Two years later, in 1798, the total number of Yeomanry in Norfolk 
and Norwich was stated to be 632, the total in the Kingdom being I9,t9a 

In the Norfolk Chronicle of August 6th, 1796, there is an account of the 
proceedings of a court-martial, which was held at the White Swan Intl, 
Norwich, on the 30th June, 1796, under the presidency of Colonel Deering, of 
the New Rdmney Fencibles, to try several chaises preferred against Lieutenant 
Alexander, of the Norfolk Fencible Cavalry. In the course of the inquiry 
several facts were elicited which throw an interesting light upon military life in 
th^ old days. Lieutenant Alexander was adjutant of the regiment, and the 
complaints lodged against him were, that he had been guilty of disrespectful 
and contemptuous behaviour to the prosecutor. Captain Smith, his superior 
officer, in the presence of the men on parade, on the i6th of March ; that he 
had struck James Corey, a sentry under arms, on the 8th of April ; and that 
on the 7th April he had traduced the character of Captain Smith, by calling 
him "an encourager of republicans and a turn-coat, and made use of 
expressions towards him unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." We have it 
on the authority of Uncle Toby that " our troops swore terribly in Flanders/' 
and there was undoubtedly some terribly hard swearing at this court-martial. 
Captain Smith, Captain Varlo, Comet Chambers, and Quarter-Master Howe 
asserted positively that the prisoner made use of the most disrespectful epithets 
towards the prosecutor, and Seigeant RadclifTe, and three others, who were on 
parade at the same time, were equally positive that nothing of the kind 
occurred. In support of the second charge, which was not denied. Corporal 
James Howorth and Private Corey gave evidence ; but three witnesses called 
on behalf of the prisoner said that the corporal of the guard was asleep when 
on duty, that Corey was absent from his post, and that the Lieutenant gave the 
latter a sound thrashing " by way of reprimand." The evidence with regard to 
the third charge differed materially. Lieutenant Alexander called the Rev. Mr. 
Pearson, Colonel Sibthorpe, and Major Astley, who stated that the prisoner 
certainly did call Captain Smith "an encourager of republicans" and "a turn- 
coat," but the epithets were used in a private room, and *' in consequence of 
very violent and irritating language on the part of the prosecutor." If we 
may judge from the evidence of Colonel Harbord, Captain Varlo, and Sergt.- 
Major Hali| the prisoner had been very hardly dealt with. Their statements 



yo The Records of the Yeomanty Cavalry of Norfolk, 1796. 



went to show that Lieutenant Alexander was kept in custody for a consider- 
able time, while the prosecutor was allowed full liberty. Orders had also been 
given to the privates not to speak to prisoner on pain of being punished, in 
consequence of which, he contended, he was unable to obtain evidence that 
was material to his interests. Lieut«Colonel Astley spoke fully of the 
character of Lieutenant Alexander, sa}ring that he had always known him to 
be diligent and attentive to his duties, and that the chief merit in forming the 
regiment was due to the prisoner. The court were occupied for some time in 
sifting the mass of contradictory testimony, but ultimately the following 
sentence was passed, and in due course received the approval of his Majesty : — 
'^ The court are of opinion that Lieutenant Alexander has been guilty of the 
first and second charges, but that the second charge is frivolous and vexatious. 
On the third charge the court are of opinion that he is not guilty of publicly 
calling Captaiu Smith, by the epithets alluded to etc ; but that he is guilty of 
making use of several expressions towards him unbecoming an officer and a 
gentleman, and we, therefore, sentence him to ask pardon of Captain Smith in 
the presence of the commanding officer." Thus ended an inquiry which for a 
time created a considerable amount of feeling between the local partisans of 
the two officers. 

Soon after the episode of the court-martial, the Norfolk Fendble 
Cavalry was ordered to march northwards. For some months it did duty 
at Carlisle, and Deutenant Alexander was promoted Captain shortly after 
leaving Norwich. The regiment also did duty at Edinbui^h, and finished 
the remainder of its service in Scotland. 

There appears to have been a considerable variety in uniform even 
among the mounted forces of Norfolk; but it was generally modelled on 
that of the Light Dragoons, namely, a furred helmet, short red or blue 
jacket, leather breeches or cloth pants, black gaiters or knee-boots with 
turned over topi^ The Government in 1796 recommended the general 
adoption of this uniform for the Yeomanry and Provisional Cavalry, namely, 
a green jacket, with red facings and white lace, at 195. \ green cloth 
pantaloons at lox.; leather cap and feather, 2s. 6d.\ half boots, i%s.\ but 
it is needless to say that each unit adopted its own uniform according to 
the various tastes of their respective commanding officers. 

The orthodox saddlery appears to have been similar in pattern to that 
which was "regulation" up to about the year 1885, and included a sheep- 
skin flounce over the holsters — a necessary protection from the weather to 
the flint and steel pistol Cruppers were always worn, as they were indeed 
by everybody on all occasions in hilly countries within the memory of 
living men, and by the regular cavalry within the last thirty years. 

At first, at any rate, the men brought their owq civilian 9addle9 in 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1796. 71 



most cases, which in those days, when people rode their journeys, and 
had to protect themselves from highwaymen, were as well adapted for the 
service as the Colonial's or bushman's saddle at the present time. 

The arms were a curved sabre with a single-bar guard and a pistol. 

Fortescue, in his admirable " History of the British Army," says : — 

"The training of the mounted troops in 1796 still remained very 
imperfect The new drill, with its novelty of executing manoeuvres by 
threes, was indeed made obligatory in 1795, and a code of signals for the 
trumpet was drawn up and made uniform for all mounted corps in 1798. 
In 1796 also regulations for sword exercise, drawn up by the fencing- 
master, Angelo, were published by authority, and schools of instruction 
therein were opened at several centres both for the Regular and the 
Auxiliary Cavalry. But still nothing was officially required of the Drs^oons, 
light or heavy, beyond excellence in performing showy evolutions ; the more 
difficult duties of scouting, reconnaissance, and dismounted work being 
entirely neglected. Of the many new regiments raised, both regular and 
auxiliary, nearly all were nominally light dragoons, yet not one had the 
slightest knowledge of the special functions of that arm. 

'*But it was greatly to their discredit that the regiments were never 
taught to rally. In short apart from the addition of the uniformity in 
drill, the attempt to improve the cavalry service appears to have ended 
in the substitution of grey for blue in the uniform of Light Dragoons in 
India, and the dressing of the hair in all ranks in a queue measuring ten 
inches in length below the collar. Speaking generally, the condition of 
the Cavalry at this period seems to have been bad, partly owing to the 
extreme dispersion of regiments and the under-payment of subalterns, 
which were causes beyond control, partly from general idleness and 
neglect The Duke of York therefore took the mounted troops early in 
band; and having first circulated Dundas's book of drill to commanding 
officers and enjoined its use for all regiments, he in March 1796 appointed 
a board of General Officers to enquire as to the clothing, saddlery and 
equipment of the men. As to the clothing they recommended the abolition 
of the long coat in favour of one with short skirts, the substitution for 
epaulettes of wings strong enough to turn a sword cut, breeches of plush 
with woolen lining instead of leather, and boots well hollowed at the 
back to be the more easily drawn on and oflf. In the matter of saddlery 
they produced a new pattern of saddle, and recommended the abolition of 
housings, the showy and ponderous drapery which served for an ornament 
to the horse and for a coverlet to the man. 

''The arms and equipment they left unaltered, desiring only that the 
bayonet should be issued to light as well as to heavy dragoons; which 



72 The Records of the Yeofnanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1796- 



suggestion was rejected. As to the horses they pointed out that the breed 
of black horses formerly ridden by all heavy cavalry was either extinct or 
completely transformed, all animals in the fharket being suitable only for 
dratight and unfit to carry a soldier. Finally, they urged that a veterinary 
surgeon, a saddler, and an armourer should be attached to every regiment 
of cavalry in the service. 

"Thtis the hew departure was finally established, and with trained 
horse-doctors, saddlers, armourers, the efficiency of the Cavalry bade SaXi 
to show substantial improvement" 

In this year, I908, when this new Territorial Forces Act is about 
doming into being, a great deal has been said about the duties that 
employers of labour owe to the Volunteer force. Military men, when 
endeavotiring td impress upon them the absolute necessity of granting 
their employfs reasonable facilities to join the service and to perfect them- 
selves in its work and discipline, are too often regarded as alarmists and 
faddists. It may not be out of place to remind those who are at all 
apathetic regarding the internal defences of the country that in face of 
actual danger certain demands, against which there was no appeal, have 
been mado upon the public, and may be again should the exigencies of 
War require it. In the year 1796, when, owing to the attitude of France, 
grave fears were entertained for the safety of our insular position, two 
important measures were passed, to which I have alluded before; but as 
I am rapidly approaching the period during which they became operative, 
I prefer to refer to them again. These measures were: The Provisional 
Cavalry Act and the Supplementary Militia Act. The public were 
apprised of the provisions of the Act first mentioned on September 30th, 
when the Bill was before Parliament. It ordered that each person charged 
to the horse duty with ten horses kept for riding purposes, or for drawing 
carriages, was to provide one man properly clothed, and one mare or 
gelding not less than 14.2 ; if twenty horses, then two horses and two 
hien, and so on. Every person who failed before a certain date to 
deliver a correct list of horses to the County Treasurer was liable to a 
penalty of ;f20, and it devolved upon the Lords Lieutenant and Deputy 
Lieutenants to see that the Act was properly carried out All persons 
serving in the county cavalry were required to take the oath of 
allegiance, and none were to be under the age of sixteen nor above 
fifty-five ; and if a man was not properly dressed in the uniform pre- 
scribed by the Court of Lieutenancy, the person who provided him was 
liable to a penalty of 5^. The force thus enrolled was to be embodied 
at such times and manner, and under like regulations and restrictions as 
applied to the Militia. His Majesty was empowered to form it into 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1796, 73 



regiments or troops, and to appoint the officers under the conditions 
observed in the regular cavalry, but no part of the force was to serve 
out of Great Britain. The men were to receive the same pay as all other 
cavalry, with the benefits of Chelsea Hospital, and reasonable allowance 
was to be made to the proprietor for the loss or wounding of a horse. 
The officers, while liable to fines for non-attendance at muster, were 
exempted from serving the office of Sheriff, nor were privates to be called 
upon to fill any parochial offices, although they were permitted to exercise 
their trades. On the passage of the Act, Norfolk and Norwich raised 337 
men for the cavalry, and under the Supplementary Militia Act the county 
provided 1,781 and the city 211. Great discontent was occasioned by the 
measure, and in the following month, when the Lord Lieutenant (the 
Marquis Townshend) held his court at Norwich Shirehall to carry its 
provisions into effect, the populace behaved in so tumultuous a manner 
that the proceedings were adjourned to the Angel Hotel. At the second 
meeting another disturbance occurred, but, upon the appearance of the 
military, the mob " contented themselves with burning in effigy some 
grotesque figures, to which they attached the names of certain distinguished 
characters." 

The year 1796 had been the period of that unprecedented tide of 
success to the arms of revolutionary France, under the guidance of 
Bonaparte in Italy, and of Moreau in Germany, which for a time seemed 
to render hopeless all attempts at resistance. The ordinary resources of 
the Continental Powers had been completely exhausted in the struggle, 
and it was only by the support derived from the enormous subsidies granted 
by England that they found the means of continuing it The supply of 
these subsidies, in addition to the extraordinary and increasing expenses 
of our own establishments, caused a drain upon our Treasury, which 
rendered necessary a resort to the dangerous expedient of yearly public 
loans, and as a consequence to a system of taxation pressing with severity 
upon all classes of people. The discontent, always consequent upon such a 
pressure, was taken advantage of by the numerous revolutionary emissaries, 
by whom the country was at this time overrun, and it was only by the 
firmness of the Government and the patriotic exertions and assistance of 
the well-disposed of all classes, who, like the Yeomen of Norfolk, came 
forward in support of it, that the year was brought to a close without the 
calamities attendant upon internal commotion. 

The names of the various Yeomanry Corps belonging to the county of 
Norfolk and the officers who formed part of them, for the year 1796, are 
given here, as they appear in the War Office records for that year: — 



74 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1796-7 





Norfolk Gentlemen and Yeomanry 




BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WAL8HAM TROOP 




Captain 


James Burkin Burroughes 


18 March 1795 


Lieut 


William Heath 


>* 19 It 


Comet 


John Sibell 

CLACKCLOSE CORPS 


•f }> 1} 


Major com^ 


Thomas Hare 


23 Nov 1796 


Captain 


John Thurlow Dering 


II II II 


Capt-Lieut. 


Thos. Berners Plestow 


tt II 11 


Lieut 


George William Manby 


II II II 


Comet 


Edmund SafTery 


II II It 


»t 


James Hare 

EAST DEREHAM TROOP 


II It It 


Captain 


Thomas Wodehouse 


30 Oct 1794 


Lieut. 


John Hyde 


23 June 1796 


Comet 


John Thome 

HINGHAM TROOP 


ti It II 


Captain 


B. Gurdon Dillingham 


24 June 1794 


Lieut 


Hammond Alpe 


II II II 


Comet 


James Murray 

TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


11 II II 


Captain 


Charles Laton 


17 April 179s 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


II II II 


Comet 


George Cubttt 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


1* II 1* 


Major Com' 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


George Beauchamp 


H II » 


H 


Sir Martin B. Folkea Bart 


•1 11 II 


Comet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 


9 Dec 1794 


11 


Martin B. Polices 


x8 Nov 1795 



1797. 

The storm which in 1797 had poured its fury upon the powers of 
the Continent appeared at the commencement of 1797 to be gathering 
against this country. England was held out as a mark for the most 
deadly animosity to the people of France and of those States which 
had been compelled to unite their forces with hers. The naval resources 
of Spain and Holland were more especially put in requisition to combine 
with the fleets of France in a formidable plan of invasion. At the same 



\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ i797« 75 



time, the internal aflfairs of this Kingdom assumed a most alarming aspect 
from the critical state of its finances. The causes to which I have already 
adverted had occasioned a demand for specie and an exportation of the 
precious metals to a degree so unprecedented that the Bank of England 
found itself compelled to suspend its cash payments. The consternation 
which pervaded every part of the Kingdom on this event being made 
known was followed by a still more fearful cause of alarm from the 
intelligence that our principal fleets were in a state of open mutiny, and 
though^ by the measures of firmness and conciliation resorted to by the 
Admiralty, the crews of the vessels at Portsmouth and in the Channel 
were in a short time brought back to their duty, yet the red flag of 
defiance was again hoisted by a formidable division at Sheemess and the 
Nore, the crews of which, after threatening and ill-treating their officers, 
forcibly sent them ashore and placed the command of the ships in the 
hands of their own rebellious leaders. The mutiny having been suppressed 
and the ringleaders brought to condign punishment, the country recovered 
from the apprehension of danger at home ; whilst the threatened appearances 
of attacks from foreign fleets were in a great measure dissipated by the 
brilliant victory of Sir John Jervis off Cape St Vincent 

The local newspapers, at this period, are full of notices about the 
Provisional Cavalry. It will suffice, however, if I give one example of them. 
The Norwich Mercury of Jan. 14th, 1797, runs as follows : — 

"NORFOLK CAVALRY. 

** At a General Meeting of Lieutenancy held this day at the Castle of 
Norwich, in the Shire*house there, for carrying into execution an Act of 
Parliament passed in the present Session, entitled, *An Act for enabling 
his Majesty to raise a Provisional Force of Cavalry, to be embodied in 
case of Necessity, for the Defence of these Kingdoms,* 

^ It was resolvedi 

'' That it is the opinion of this Meeting, that the Deputy Lieutenants at 
their Sub division Meetings, should allow to any person drawn by ballot, 
who shall be deemed unfit for the said service, a sum not exceeding £\ 
for a substitute: That a sum not exceeding £\^ should be allowed to 
any person who shall not have in his possession a horse fit for military 
duty, and who shall be obliged to provide another: 

"That a sum not exceeding £^ be allowed for any extra expences to 
be incurred in providing furniture for each horse: That an allowance, not 
exceeding 2s. 6d. a week, be made towards the extra expences in keeping 
such horse in a condition fit fQr military duty^ to be computed from the 
day of muster ; 



76 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1797. 



''That the sum of £2 9s. be allowed for the cloathlng of each man, 
agfreable to the pattern dress approved of by his Royal Highness the 
Duke of York. 

"By order of the Deputy Lieutenants, 

"CHARLES LAY. 
"Clerk of the General Cavalry Meeting. 
" NB. The Pattefn Dfess is deposited at the house of Roger Kerrison 
Esq in Norwich for iiispection, that the cloathing may be uniformly made." 



Notices were also inserted that, on a certain date, the Lieutenancy 
would meet for the purpose of hearing appeals of all persons who shall 
claim to an exemption to serve in the Provisional Force of Cavalry ; and 
that immediately after the hearing of such appeals, the lists will be 
amended, and the name of one person will be drawn by ballot out of 
every class to be enrolled to serve in the said Provisional Force of Cavalry. 

The Provisional Cavalry Act was now in full force, as I find the local 
newspapers of this date teeming with similar announcements. There is no 
doubt that it was stty unpopular, but at this period acted as a very 
powerful incentive to raising the various independent troops of Yeomanry 
Cavalry, as I find a notice which states: — 

"The Lords of the Privy Council have directed the Ballot for the 
Provisional Cavalry of the subdivision of this city (Norwich) to be suspended 
till the 20th of February, which will entitle any volunteer corps formed in 
this city before the 20th inst, to the exemption from this ballot, provided 
the number of horses entered by each volunteer does not exceed three." 

At a meeting held at the King's Head Inn that month, the gentlemen 
present unanimously resolved to form themselves into an "independent 
troop of yeomanry cavalry unconnected with the Provisional Cavalry," and 
requested, " on Tuesday evening, the 14th inst, at 7 o'clock precisely, at the 
King's Head in Norwich, the company of such gentlemen of Norwich and 
its vicinity who are disposed to join this loyal corps for the defence of their 
King and country." 

Hitherto, the county of Norfolk has been almost exclusively dealt with, 
and therefore it is only right that a word should be said about the spirit of 
the good citizens of Norwich, as soon after the Yeomanry movement had 
commenced in the county the fires of patriotism commenced to burn in 
the city. The following meeting was summoned for the purpose of raising 
an independent Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 77 

At that meeting the following resolutions were passed : — 

*' That we whose names are here subscribed do agree to form ourselves 
into a troop of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, subject to the regulation 
of 34, Geo. Ill, c. 31, commonly called 'The Yeomanry Cavalry Act * and 
to stich rules and bye laws as may be hereafter formed by a committee 
and confirmed by a general meeting." ** That another meeting be held on the 
2 1st, for the purpose of approving 'a pattern uniform and accoutrements* 
and of receiving subscriptions in aid of what may be received from the 
County Fund, to be applied towards the re-imbursement of the expences 
of forming this corps, and that subscriptions be received at the Bank$ of 
Charles Weston Esq and Co. Roger Kerrison and Son Esqrs, and Harvey 
and Hudson Esqrs. 

" signed John Harvey. John Rooks. Joseph Stannard junr. 

Walter Worth. William Dunnington. Charles Reynolds. John Stoddart. 
J. N. Frewer. John Patteson. Joseph Clover. Richard Watson. Robert 
R. Baker. John Browne. William Hanks junr. Robert Harvey junr. John 
Ives. Tho. Chamberlin. 

" Resolved — ^That the thanks of the Volunteers be given to Robert 
Harvey jun Esq, for his zeal and unremitted attention in raising the 
corps ; and that he be requested to act as Treasurer and Chairman^ for 
the superintendance and regulations of the corps. 

" Gentlemen disposed to enroll themselves into the Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers, are entreated to apply to Robert Harvey jun Esq, or to Mr 
Charles Reynolds, who has a list of the Members, and a pattern of the 
uniform and accoutrements — And Ladies and Gentlemen who may wish to 
contribute towards the equipment of this loyal and constitutional corps, 
are entreated to pay their subscriptions to any of the Norwich Banks, to 
the Committee, or to any member of the Corps." 

The following are the resolutions adopted at the meeting for the 
guidance of the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers. The original^ on 
parchment, is in possession of the writer. 

'* Resolved — the present crisis requiring the national exertion of loyalty 
and public spirit, this meeting, consisting of gentlemen resident in Norwich 
and its vicinity, will form themselves into a troop of Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers, under the 36 George III chapter 31st, to learn without delay, 
the use of arms, to be ready on all occasions to come forward in aid of 
the civil magistracy, and if required, to march out of Norfolk in case of 
invasion. 

" Resolved — The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers having been approved 
by his Majesty, that a copy of these resolutions with the name and 



78 The Records of Uie Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 



residence of each member of the troop be presented to the Mayor of 
Norwich, authorising him to demand the assistance of the Norwich Light 
Horse Volunteers, whenever in his opinion their services may be required. 

" Resolved — ^That it be recommended to each Gentleman of the troop 
to be instructed in the exercise of the Hungarian broad sword, and to get 
his horse properly trained. 

"Resolved — That a committee, not less than five, nor exceeding nine 
(including the Chairman) be appointed to regulate the proceedings of 
the troop. 

" Resolved — that on any question, a majority of two thirds of the troop 
shall be binding upon the whole. 

** Resolved — That a treasurer be appointed, and the fines agreed upon 
to be paid into a stock purse. 

'' Resolved — That Gentlemen absent without leave on a field-day, or not 
appearing until after the troop is told oflT, to be fined 2x (xl. to be paid 
unconditionally to the quarter-master (professional gentlemen only excepted). 

''Resolved — That silence be observed in the ranks during exercise, 
otherwise no one can learn or understand his duty. A deviation in this 
article to be subject to the forfeiture of i/- and that the quarter-master be 
earnestly requested to attend to this in particular. 

"Resolved — That after three sucessive absences from duty without 
previously assigning to the commanding officer in person or in writing a 
satisfactory reason for such conduct, shall be submitted to the consideration 
of a general meeting. 

" Resolved — That punctuality and precision being essential in all military 
operations, it is therefore expected that every gentleman will feel it a 
point of honour in being at his post rather before the time fixed than one 
minute after it That time is always meant to be precise whether so 
expressed or not. 

" Resolved — That not less than 5/- be collected from each gentleman, for 
the troop dinners, and that on the day of the review and His Majestys 
birthday the excess of the bill be discharged from the stock purse, but at 
no other time ; and each gentleman to pay his own expences on 
field-days. 

** Resolved— That the uniform laid before the meeting be adopted, with 
the usual military boots, white breeches, helmet, black stock, and 
rosette. 

"Resolved — ^That the undress uniform do consist of a dark blue coat, 
with black velvet cuffs and collars, and uniform buttons, white waistcoat 

and breeches. 

" Resolved— Should any Gentleman be permitted to leave the troop 



\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 797, 79 



before the expiration of twelve months from the day of his entering, he 
will be subject to return the £^ advanced to him from the fund. 

"Resolved — That the Lord Lieutenant be requested to recommend to 
his Majestys approbation, John Harvey Esqr as Captain ; Roger Hayes 
Esqr as Lieutenant ; and John Ives Esqr as cornet of the troop. 

"Resolved — That the Chairman or commanding officer of the troop be 
desired to wait upon the general residents in NORWICH with copies of 
these resolutions. 

'* Resolved — Gentlemen disposed to enrol themselves in the Norwich 
Light Horse Volunteers are entreated to apply to the commanding officer, 
or Robert Harvey Junr Esqr chairman. 

" Resolved — Thanks of the volunteers be given to Robert Harvey Jun 
Esq, for his zeal and unremitted attention in raising the corps, and that 
he be requested to act as treasurer and chairman for the superintendance 
and regulation of the corps. 

'* Resolved, — That upon any appearance of tumult in the city of Norwichf 
the Gentlemen do immediately assemble (without waiting for summonses) on 
the Castle Meadow, on horseback in uniform with their swords and pistols." 



Major-General Prince William Frederick, afterwards Duke of Gloucester, 
arrived in Norwich on April 2nd, 1797. 

It is mentioned that he reviewed the Loddon, Blofield, and Tunstead 
trobps of Yeomanry Cavalry on Mousehold Heath. The troops passed in 
squadron, then in single and double file, and charged in single troops and 
squadrons. After the Prince had left the ground, the Blofield Corps went 
through the Hungarian broad sword exercise. 

The diffisrent Corps at Yarmouth were inspected, and a whole week 
was devoted to the drilling and manoeuvring of troops of Yeomanry Cavalry 
and companies of Infantry Volunteers, in various parts of the county. On 
his tour of duty, the Prince and his brilliant suite were accompanied by 
Mr. Patteson and Mr. R. Harvey, jun. So popular did His Royal Highness 
become that the Corporation conferred upon him the honorary freedom of 

the city. 

When at length the time for bis departure arrived, the hope was expressed 
on all sides that he would speedily return. The desire of the citizens was 
gratified, as in the following August the Prince again appeared among them 
as the guest of Mr. Patteson. 

During the summer of 1797, it is evident that the Yeomanry Corps 
were not allowed to remain idle, as there are numerous mentions of their 
inspections. 



8o The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 



The Hingham and Dereham were reviewed on Toftwood Common by 
General Garth on June 2nd, who was highly satisfied with the manner in 
which they went through their evolutions. The same week the Tunstead 
troop were also reviewed. 

The Norwich Merairy relates that on June 5 th, the 4th troop of Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry presented to the Rev. Thomas C. Munnings, their sergeant, 
an emblematical medal bearing the Medallion of the King (which the artist 
had represented by a Guinea) surrounded by symbols of *' Religion, Liberty, 
and Law," which was the motto; on one side of the medal the standard 
of the troop, with iU motto, " Our God, our King, and our Country," and on 
the reverse, expressing a compliment to Mr. Munnings, this motto, " Be 
England prosperous and the World in Peace." 

Later on, in more than one instance in the rural parishes the clergyman 
was named as a suitable member of the troop, and in some instances, which I 
will have occasion to note later, as commander ; but this led to an immediate 
Interdiction by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishops, requiring the 
clergy not to accept any position in the military associations. 

The Norwich Mercury, June 24/A, 1797. , 

"On Wednesday the 7th inst, the Tunstead and Happing troop 
commanded by Capt Layton was reviewed by Lieut General Tonyn at 
Coltishall. The evolutions were so well executed, both in correctness and 
rapidity, that it would have done credit to any old-established corps. The 
troop opened their files to double distances and dismounted at the request of 
the General, on which he thanked the Grentlemen individually for their 
steadiness and exertion, and said that he should report to His Majesty the 
troop was in perfect readiness for service. 

'^Greneral Tonyn inspected on Tuesday the Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers at Hethersett Green, where Mrs R. Harvey had the honour to 
present the standard of the troop to Cornet John Ives. At the close of the 
day, a most convivial soldierlike dinner was provided under canvas in the 
field; where some respectable characters joined this loyal troop. A barrel 
of strong beer was given by the corps to the surrounding throng of village 
lads and lasses, to drink health and happiness to the King and Royal 
Family. 

''On Monday last 200 French prisoners under an escort of horse and 
foot, proceeded from the castle, on their way to the great receptacle at 
Stilton. Several of them were barelegged, and some of them barefooted ; 
but they were in general sturdy, able bodied fellows, making such an 
appearance as might be expected from the piratical crews of petty privateers. 
They marched through the city, singing the Marseilaise Hymn and other 
revolutionary songs." 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 



81 



The following petition shows the spirit of loyalty which must have 
pervaded the men who composed the Fencible Cavalry of Norfolk : — 

To THE Hon. Col. Harbord 

COMMANDING THE NORFOLK FENCIBLE CAVALRY. . 



We, the Non-commissioned officers and privates of the four Troops of 
Norfolk Fencible Cavalry, quartered in these barracks, think it our duty 
thus publicly to express our gratitude to our beloved King and Country 
for the late increase of our pay; and humbly request you will beg the 
favour of his Royal Highness the Duke of York, to lay our most grateful 
thanks before his Majesty; and we at the same time, thus publicly declare, 
that we are willing and ready to support our most glorious Constitution 
with our lives whenever we may be called out It having been represented 
to us, that various attempts have been made in different parts of the king- 
dom to seduce our fellow soldiers from the duty and allegiance which we 
owe to our King and Country. — We hereby offer a Reward out of our own 
subsistence of Seventy-seven Pounds, on conviction before a Magistrate, to 

whoever shall apprehend any person or persons daring to presume to 
distribute Money, seditious Writings, or persuasive Language, with an inten- 
tion to seduce or cause any illegal disturbance to be made amongst us. 
In witness whereof we have set our hands in behalf for the four Troops. 

Quarter Masters. 
J. Gaze 

J. Bird. 

Sergeants. 

T. Hall, (sergeant-major) 

J. Longford. 



J. Morrison. 
D. Moss Pattle. 



J. Tetlow. 
J. Radcliffe. 
J. Burton. 
J. Collinson. 

John Coe. 
John Beamon 
John Gibbons 
Thomas Baxter 
George Lees 
J. Hilton 

Hamilton Barrack, 
Carlisle, 
June 8th, 1797. 



Corporals 



J. Cooper. 
J. Roach. 
Thomas Gibson. 
J. Taylor. 
John Wighton. 
Thomas Lees. 

J, Howorth 
Thomas Hague 
Timothy Woods 
Daniel Brierly 
J. Butterworth 
J. Plummer. 



F 



82 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1797. 



The officers composing the Norfolk Fencible Cavaliy at this date, 
when they were quartered at Carlisle, are as follows in the Army List:^ 



Colonel 


Hon. W. Asheton Harbord 


Lieut CoL 


Jacob Henry Astley 


Major 


John Smith 


Captain 


John Varlo 




Augustus Duggan 




William Mathews 


Capt Lieut 


Robert Alexander 


Lieut 


Alexander Davison 




John Thomltnson 




William Sherwin Thomas. 




Thomas James Gaze 




Thomas William J. Griffiths 


Comet 


George Cressall 




John Bryant 




Thomas C Grainger 




Jer. Nisbett 




J. K. Chandler 




Rob. Alexander 


Chaplain 


William Churchill 


Adjutant 


Robert Alexander 


Surgeon 


James Bryant 


Agents 


Cox and Greenwood. 



Norwich Mercury^ Sept 2nd, 1797. 

** Norfolk Provisional Cavalry. 

" At a General Meeting of Lieutenancy on the 26th day of August last, it 
was ordered that a muster of the PROVISIONAL CAVALRY be taken as follows. 



''For the city of Norwich, in Surry Street, on Monday the i6th of October, 
at ten in the forenoon. 

" For the Hundred of Blofield, Taverham and Walsham, at Sprowston on 
Magdalen Fairstead, same day, at one in the afternoon, and so on for the 
remaining hundreds of the county. 

'' It is expected that each man appears on the day of muster cloathed with 
jacket. Pantaloons, Half-Boots, Cap and Feather, agreable to the pattern 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 797. 



83 



dress, which may be seen at the house of Mr. Charles Reynolds, in the Market 
Place, Norwich ; and that each man be mounted on an able mare or gelding, of 
the height of 14 hands or upwards, with the following horse fnmiture, (patterns 
of which may be seen at the house of Mr. John Frewer, in the Market Place, 
Norwich)L ''A saddle with white cantle, bridle, breast plate and martingal, 
male pad and straps, cloak bag, holsters, collar with chain rein, horse rug 
and nose bag. 

"NB. The price of the cloathing £2. 9s. — ^the horse furniture £^ 

** By order of the Deputy Lieutenants 
" CHARLES LAY. 

'' Clerk of the General Cavalry Meeting.** 



The Officers composing the Norfolk Provisional Cavalry. 



Colonel 
Lieut. Col. 
Major 
Captain 



Capt. Lieut. 
Lieut 

Cornet 



Adjutant 



William Earle Bulwer 

Robert John Buxton 

Mark Hild Dickens {sic) 

George Cubitt 

Robert Harvey 

Thomas Blofield 

James Vine, Mathias {sic) 

Danderson Coats 

John Gay 

Roger Hays 

Charles Laton 

Robert Barrett 

Charles Clarke 

James Gardner Bloom 

William Clopton Johnson 

Charles Leeder 

William Benjamin Godfrey 

Thomas Calthorpe Blofield 

John Raven 

Roger Hays 



10 July 1797 



In August, 1797, Major-General Money was greatly offended when he 
found that Colonel Bulwer was appointed to command the Norfolk 
Provisional Cavalry, a position that he thought his long experience and 
devoted loyalty entitled him to. He wrote the Duke of York a very 



84 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolky 1797. 



outspoken letter, saying that he naturally expected an appointment, but 
that Lord Townshend had informed him that '^ gentlemen of superior 
property had offered their services, and that it was incumbent on him to 
propose them.*' 

The General went on to tell his Royal Highness how much he 
''lamented that property and not military experience is to determine the 
choice of men to head our National forces, who are to lead them into 
action, and on whose conduct the fate of the British empire may depend." 

Speaking of his attachment to royalist principles, he said, " One, my 
Lord, who could risk his life as I did on the fatal loth August, to 
protect that unfortunate Louis in the palace of the Tuilleries, can hardly 
want a certificate of his attachment to monarchy " ; and he concludes his 
protest by reminding the Duke that ''had the French Directory wanted 
to see the Rent Roll of every mans estate before they gave them 
regiments, or entrusted them with the command of their armies, they 
would not at this hour have been dictators of a peace to Europe/' 

Fortescue says: — "The Provisional Cavalry was called into existence 
when the alarm of invasion was at its greatest, in November 1796. A 
part of it, Suffolk for one, was embodied in 1797, and disembodied at the 
same time with the Fencible Cavalry in the spring of 1800. I have been 
unable to discover what degree of efficiency it may have originally 
possessed, but if there was any merit either in the higher or the lower 
ranks, this force after three years training should have been of considerable 
value. It must, however, be remarked that the Government shrank from 
the unpopularity of using its powers of compulsion in respect of the 
Provisional Cavalry, readily abdicating them in favour of doubtful promises 
of voluntary service. Before the Act for its creation had been for many 
weeks in force, an amending enactment was passed, providing that if any 
town or county should raise volunteers equal to three-fourths of the number 
required under the original Act, then the Lord Lieutenant should have 
power to dispense with Provisional Cavalry and to raise Yeomanry, or in 
other words. Volunteer Cavalry. This was of a piece with Pitts military 
policy at large. He never passed an Act for National Defence without 
ap amendment to substitute 'You may serve' for 'You must serve.'" 

No doubt he could have adduced many arguments in favour of this 
course, based ultimately upon the proposition, which he regarded as an 
axiom, that his withdrawal from office would mean the ruin of England. • 
None the less the principle was surely unsound. An Act to compel men 
to voluntary service, which (absurd as it may seem) was the purport of 
this and others of his measures, is an Act to enable m^n to evade 
service, 



L 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ i797- 85 



It was, however, found advisable to make great additions to our 
internal means of defence, by augmenting the Militia in every county and 
by encouraging the formation of Volunteer Corps, both of Cavalry and 
Infantry. Our foreign foes continued through the year to make the most 
threatening demonstrations. The preparations in France and Holland were 
continued with the avowed object of an invasion. In the latter country, 
great preparations were made, and a large land force already embarked in 
the Texel, the destination of which was Ireland, to co-operate with the 
malcontents in that country, with whom they were in constant communica- 
tion. A series of adverse winds hindered the sailing of the expedition, 
and the troops were at length disembarked. The Dutch fleet, however, 
put to sea in the month of October, when they were met on their own 
coast by the British fleet under Admiral Duncan, and the glorious and 
well fought action ensued, which ended in the decisive victory of 
Camperdown. The foregoing details will have sufficiently shown the extent 
to which the services of the Norfolk Yeomanry were required through this 
unsettled period ; a time, in which, from the combination of circumstances 
unparalleled in our history, the Government and institutions of this country 
had been threatened with more numerous and imminent causes of danger 
than had ever occurred within the same space of time. There can be no 
doubt that the comparative tranquillity which the country, and especially 
the metropolis, had enjoyed during this critical period was to be attributed 
in great measure to the manner in which all classes of the well-disposed 
part of the people had, after the example of the Yeomanry and Volunteers, 
come forward to the support of the Government The effects of this 
support were visible in the improved appearance of public affairs at the 
commencement of 1798. 

Several tokens of a military nature were issued between 1793 and 1797* 
The reason which led to their issue was as follows : In the year 1754, the 
Government suspended the issue of copper coinage on account of the very large 
number of counterfeits and forgeries which were circulated throughout the 
country. In fact, according to Snelling, writing in 1753, nearly two-fifths of the 
halfpennies and farthings in circulation were forgeries. This suspension 
lasted for upwards of twenty years, and the want of copper currency and small 
money for change having gradually arisen, the Government authorised the 
issue of copper pence, halfpence, and farthings by private individuals. 

One of these military tokens has on the obverse: A mounted yeoman with 
drawn sword, " Loyal Norfolk Yeomanry " ; in the exergue, " MDCCXCVI." 
Reverse : A military trophy, " Blofield Cavalry^' and on a scroll is impressed, 
*• Fifth Troop:' On the edge is engraved, " Fear God and Honour the King!" 



86 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 



Norwich Mercury, Dec. 30th, 1797. 

A SONG 

FOR THE NORWICH LIGHT HOR8B VOLUNTEERS. 

TkfiM— **Anacreon in Heaven.*' 

Hark ! hark ! how the genius of Gallia's proud coast 

Threats our Throne, and our Altars to dash to the ground. 
Britannia with scorn hears the arrogant boast, 
No danger appals her, no threats e'er confound. 
Arm, Britons I she cries, 
And behold her Sons rise, 
Whilst valor and loyalty flash from their eyes; 
All ranks and degrees see indignant advance. 
To protect theh: lov'd Isle from the boasters of France. 

No turbulent Democrats here shall be seen. 

With furies domestic, a horrible band: 
Faith, honor and freedom preside o'er each green. 
And treason and murder still fly from our land. 
Tho' new to the field, 
Native courage our shield, 
Britain's sons shall once more force proud GaUia to yield, 
And all ranks and degrees shall with ardor advance. 
To protect their loved Isle from the Demons of France. 

&c. for two more venes in the nine refrain. 

The following is the complete list of officers who composed the various 
troops of Yeomanry Cavalry in Norfolk, as they appear in the lists, which 
are preserved in the War Office. 

Norfolk Gentlemen and Yeomanry. 

BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSHAM TROOP 

Captain James B. Burroughes 18 March 1795 

Lieut William Heath 

Comet John Sibell 



H 91 



CLACKCLOSE CORPS 

Major Thomas Hare 23 Nov 1796 

Captain John Thurlow Dering „ „ 

Capt Lieut. Thomas Bemers Plestow ,, „ 

Lieut . Geoi^e William Manby „ „ 

Comet Edmund Saflfery „ „ 

„ James Hare „ ,, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1797. 



87 





BAST DEREHAM TROOP 


• 


Captain 


Thomas Wodehouse 


30 Oct 1794 


Lieut. 


John Hyde 


23 June 1796 


Cornet 


John Thorne 

ERPINGHAM AND EYNESFORD TROOP 


II »> 


Captain 


William Earle Bulwer 


16 March 1797 


Lieut 


John HoUey 


It II 


Cornet 


George Wymer 

HINGHAM TROOP 


9 n 


Captain 


B. Gurdon Dillingham 


23 June 1794 


Capt Lieut 


Hamond AIpe 


18 Dec 1796 


Lieut 


James Murray 


28 Dec „ 


Cornet 


Philip Heath 


II n 


i 


LODDON TROOP 




Captain 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


II II 


Comet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


II II 


Major ComK 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


. Greorge Beauchamp 


II II 


>f 


Sir Martin B. Folkes Bt 


II If 


Lieut 


William Mason 


II II 


?> 


Edward Parry 


30 Oct „ 


n 


John Harvey 


23 March 1797 


Comet 


Martin B. Folkes 


18 Nov 1795 


>i 


William Becher 


30 Nov 1796 


»» 


John Ives 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE VOLUNTEERS 


23 March 1797 


Captain 






Lieut 


John Harvey 


23 March 1797 


Comet 


John Ives 

TUNSTBAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


II II 


Captain 


Charles Laton 


17 April 1795 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


II If 


Comet 


Greorge Cubitt 


II II 



88 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 798. 



The political state of the Kingdom with respect to its foreign and 
domestic relations continued to be such as to call for the most strenuous 
exertions from all persons who had the well-being of the country at heart, 
A spirit of disaffection had taken deep root in Ireland, encouraged by 
promises of co-operation from France, which broke out into acts of open 
rebellion. Disclosures however were made, which were followed almost 
immediately by the apprehension of Lord Edward Fitzgerald and some 
other leaders of the plot, and this, fortunately, led to a premature explosion 
of the rebellion before the preparations were completed in the French ports. 
However, even without foreign assistance, without adequate supplies of arms 
and munitions of war, and without any experienced military leader, these 
ill-disciplined Irish rebels, by dint of their native bravery, excited and 
influenced to the utmost by religious enthusiasm, were able to maintain a 
most formidable struggle with the Government troops. It was not until 
a large force, including, by the way, several regiments of English Fencible 
Cavalry, and commanded by experienced generals, had been sent over and 
had engaged the rebels in a series of sanguinary conflicts that this rebellion 
was suppressed. Within a few weeks after the suppression of this civil 
war by the dispersion of the rebel forces, the French auxiliaries under 
General Humbert, after eluding the vigilance of our fleets and cruisers in 
the channel, landed without opposition in Killala Bay on the west coast 
of Ireland, and the ease with which this small body of troops, unsupported, 

» 

made their way into the heart of the country, afforded sufficient evidence 
of the formidable results which must have ensued had they been in time 
to form a junction with the numerous forces of the rebellious Irish in the 
field. 

It may be well supposed that these events caused an immediate and 
extensive drain upon the regular military force in ; England, and at the 
same time gave an additional stimulus to the zeal with which the well- 
disposed of all ranks pressed forward to offer their services in the various 
Volunteer Corps, both cavalry and infantry. 

In the Norwich Mercury of March 24th, 1798, we read that 
"The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers met at St Andrews Hall, when 
Capt Patteson read a letter he received from the Marquis Townshend, also 
one enclosed from the Right Hon H. Dundas, Secretary of State, which 
letter was to enquire what extent they were willing to serve ; when it was 
spiritedly and unanimously agreed, that in case of Foreign Invasion, they 
would to a man, obey his Majestys commands anywhere in the Eastern 
District of the Kingdom, and nearly the whole corps signed ; that in case 
of imminent danger, they would cheerfully obey the same command in the 
same district The Eastern District comprehends Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge- 
shire, Essex, Lincoln, Huntingdon, Hertford. 




■nnnammamaa 



.x^*. 



^\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ ^798. 89 



^ The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers have unanimously declined the 
offer of pay, and in answering to the enquiries of Government, to what 
extent they were willing to serve ? with one voice of spirit and loyalty. 
Captain John Harvey was authorised to assure the Marquis Tbwnshend, 
that the Norwich Troop would march wherever his Majesty might think 
their services most available/' 



Norwich Mercury^ April 14th, 1798. 

" The Yeomanry corps of Norfolk Rangers met at Fakenham, when the 
Marquis Townshend read to. them the Letter from the Secretary of State, 
desiring to know the extent of service they would engage for, and the 
answers of several other Volunteer corps of the County, which he had 
received. The corps unanimously came to the following resolution : ' We 
whose names are subscribed, belonging to the corps of Norfolk Rangers 
raised in the year 1782 and being under the terms of our enrollment engaged 
to serve within the County of Norfolk only, declare our readiness in the 
present crisis, for the support of our King and Constitution, to extend our 
service to any part of the Kingdom, in which Government may think it 
necessary for us to act' Captain Sir M. B. Folkes, Bart, whose attendance 
in Parliament and Captain Beauchamp's indisposition, which prevented their 
being present, having previously notified their consent to go wherever the 
corps determined." 

There is also a further announcement, on April 28th : — " That the Pro- 
visional Cavalry and the remainder of the Supplementary Militia are both 
ordered to be embodied, by a Message from his Majesty delivered to 
Parliament. Notice was also given by the commanding officer of the 
Provisional Cavalry (Col. Bulwer), that no horses would be accepted which 
were not perfectly sound and fit for Military duty, although they may have 
passed at a prior muster." 

At Yarmouth, there was formed in April, 1798, a troop of Yeomanry 
Cavalry, supplying themselves with an outfit at their own cost, and each man 
contributing sixpence a week to a fund which in two or three years amounted 
to nearly ;f 200, and out of which, years after, the troop had new regimentals, 
which cost upwards of ;f 1,000. 

The movement once begun, and now encouraged by a letter from the 
Government to the Lord-Lieutenant, spread rapidly through the county, and 
the several districts seemed to vie with each other in hastening to add to the 
ranks of the county defenders. Meetings were held in the towns, resolutions 
passed, subscriptions mostly raised, and those who were prepared to take an 



90 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1798. 



active part signed their names to a formal order, which in all cases was 
sent to the Lord-Lieutenant, and by him to the Secretary of State. They 
also at such meetings submitted the names of those whom they wished to 
command the corps, and with scarcely an exception such gentlemen were 
granted commissions accordingly. In more than one instance in the rural 
parishes the clergyman was named as a suitable commander, but this led to 
an immediate interdiction by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishops 
requiring the clergy not to accept any position in the military associations. 

The first person on whom this prohibition fell was the Rev. Benjamin 
Wymberly Salmon, of Ormesby, who in the middle of May had to inform 
the Lord-Lieutenant that he could not accept the captaincy of the troop which 
he had been instrumental in raising in East and West Flegg, and to 
which he had been nominated by its members on the 26th April. 

The commanding officer of these corps was generally a county magnate 
or his eldest son, not afraid of responsibility, probably a warm supporter of 
the Government, and anxious, patriotism apart, to make their measures a 
success; the other officers came from the halls and manor houses of the 
neighbourhood. They must have learned a good deal in teaching their men, 
and were doubtless, after the fashion of those days, when everybody rode, 
and had a home farm and lived on his crops, pretty good horse masters and 
stud grooms. 

The men, as their name implies, were for the most part engaged in 
agriculture, farming either their own land or a portion of one of their officer's 
estates. They were supposed to ride their own horses, but it is manifest 
from the words of the Act, which exempt from horse tax persons who have 
provided Yeomanry with horses, that a good many were mounted by other 
people. There was, doubtless, a fair sprinkling of townsmen ; but whether 
from town or country, they were of a very good class : the usual title of the 
force is the Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, and letters speak of corps 
being recruited from " freeholders, yeomen, or substantial inhabitants," and 
as being composed of ** well mounted, respectable persons." 

The author of *'Coke of Norfolk and his Friends" mentions in that 
admirably written work : — 

*' Meanwhile the fear of invasion was hourly increasing throughout 
England. The alarm reached a climax in May, 1798, when Napoleon, 
keeping his destination a profound secret, prepared to sail with his troops 
from Toulon on the 19th. Eventually it was discovered that he was 
intending a campaign in Egypt, but the impression in England was that 
his designs were directed against this country, and while his preparations 
for departure were going on in France, equally rapid preparations were 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolky 1798. 91 



being made in England for his expected arrival. Piles of faggots were 
ready to be fired in warning of his approach by night, and red flags 
were sent to each parish to be hoisted on the churches as a signal of his 
approach by day." 



Thomas William Coke to the Prince of Wales. 

"May 6th, 1798. 
'• Sir, 

''I hope your Royal Highness will excuse my Presumption in 
writing this letter, and if, in the request I am going to make, I trespass against 
the rules of etiquette, I entreat your Royal Highness to pardon my 
transgression, which must be ascribed to my entire ignorance in these 
respects. 

'' Feeling eager to show my zeal in defence of my King and Country 
at this alarming crisis (however 1 may distrust Mr. Pitt and his measures, 
which have produced the dangers which threaten the British Empire), I think 
the best service I can render is by raising a Squadron of Horse, of the most 
respectable Yeomanry in this neighbourhood ; and I have to request your 
Royal Highnesses permission that we may wear the colours of ye loth for 
our uniform, and that your Royal Highness would have the condescension 
to order two soldiers from that Regiment to drill us; and it shall be our 
study to show ourselves not undeserving these favours by our unremitting 
endeavours to profit by their instructions, of which I hope your Royal 
Highness will have the opportunity of judging by honouring Holkham with 
your presence in the autumn. 

^'I have the satisfaction to assure your Royal Highness from every 
enquiry I have been able to make, all descriptions of people, from the biggest 
to the lowest, are equally zealous to exert their utmost powers to repel the 
French and to fight to the last gasp in defence of their King and Country. 

'* Military operations are forming in every part of this county, the Merchants 
and inhabitants of Lynn and Wells are arming all their small craft as 
expeditiously as possible, which is a very wise measure, as the object is to 
prevent the landing of the enemy in such ships as they must make such an 
attempt in, with any prospect of success, on our flat shores. 

'' I am happy to think an united people have little to fear from an 
invading foe, and I freely confess that the hourly increase of the National 
Debt till the blessings of Peace shall be restored, and the deplorable condition 
of Ireland, are more serious objects of terror to me than all the menaces of 
the French Directory. That every happiness may attend and may every 



92 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1798. 



evil be averted from your Royal Highness and your Posterity 13 the fervent 
prayer of 

"Sir. 
" your Royal Highness's much attached servant, 

"THOMAS WILLIAM COKE." 



Apparently all imminent fear of Napoleon's advent having been set at 
rest by the discovery that Egypt was his present destination, a certain 
delay occurred before the Prince was able to comply with Coke's request, 
and another letter from Coke must have ui^^ed its fulfilment, occasioning the 
following correspondence from the Prince : — 

H.ILH. THE Prince of Wales to Thomas William Coke. 

"Carlton House. 

•*July 1 2th, 1798. 
" My dear Coke, 

<*I this morning received your letter and immediately take up 
my pen to answer it by return of Post I assure you I have neither been 
forgetful nor neglectful as to my not having already sent you a Sergeant 
to drill and instruct your Corps ; but the sudden order for the march of 
my Regiment and for the immediate change of our Quarters, together with 
the order for our being reviewed by the King, and which is to take place 
at so early a period as Tomorrow Se'nnight, has entirely prevented my 
already forestalling your wishes ; I have found you a Sei^^eant, whom I 
will forward to Holkham as soon as possible after the review; besides 
being a good Sergeant, he happens to be one of our best Rough Riders, and 
consequently acquainted with the mode of treating the Horses, as well as 
drilling the Men as they ought to be for Squadron duty. His name is 
Holtham, and I think when you see him you will be of opinion that I do 
not starve the Regiment. 

^'I beg my very best compliments and kindest remembrance to Mrs 
Coke, and I am, dear Coke 
*> " Ever very sincerely yours 

"GEORGE P. 

''P.S. — I hope you have a good prospect of sport, and that the Wet 
will not effect (sic) the birds, in which I confess I am not a little selfish." 



In July, Coke was appointed Major Commandant of the Holkham 
Yeomanry Cavalry, and on the 23rd the Prince wrote to him again, still 
ignoring all the pressing questions of national import, but dwelling with 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 798. 93 

keen anxiety on the problem whether the Sei^eant he was sending to 
Holkham would not indulge in a failing to which his Royal Master was 
unquestionably addicted. 

" My dear Coke, 

''Our Review was over last Friday, and yesterday I ordered 
Sergeant Holtham up to town, to take his departure by this evening's stage 
for Holkham. I think he will not disgrace the Regiment, and that he will 
be diligent and conduct himself so as to recommend himself to your 
protection; he is honest, and good tempered, but apt now and then to 
drink more than he should do, and when intoxicated he forgets himself 
entirely; should this happen, it is best not to say anything to him till he 
comes to himself, and then no man can be more sensible of his error than 
he is; he has been perfectly sober of late, but I think it but fair in 
recommending him to you to state all I know of him to you. 

''Should he, which I flatter myself will be the case, conduct himself 
quite to your satisfaction, perhaps you may find the means of procuring 
him in the country some permanent situation for the rest of his Life, in 
which case I could give him his discharge, as I have done by one, Sergeant 
Taylor, whom I lent to Lord Egremont, and for whom he has procured a 
permanent situation for Life in his Yeomanry Corps. 

" Should Holtham conduct himself unworthily, I beg you will make no 
scruple in writing to me, and I will instantly order him back to the Regiment 
Batn. I really believe him to be an excellent fellow^ and that he is perfectly 
suited to what you want of him. 

" In short, my dear Coke, it shall not be my fault, if from the advice 
I have given, he is not everything he ought to be. My sincere wishes are 
that he may please, and when I have the pleasure of paying you a visit 
to Holkham in October, or November, I may have occuler {sid) demonstra- 
tion of his having done his duty by the forwardness in which I shall find 
your Men and Tenants. 

'' I beg my best compliments to Mrs Coke, and to Ralph, should he be 
with you, and am at all times, my dear Coke, ever 

"your sincere Friend 

"GEORGE P." 



Fortescue says : — ^"The Grovernment paid regular wages to one sergeant 
in each troop, in order to make good as far as possible its inability to 
furnish non-commissioned officers from the regular Army. The officers 
received two days pay, according to their rank, and the men two shillings 
weekly, on attending exercise for two days in the seven ; the principle 



94 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1798. 



being that until called out for permanent duty they should be paid for 
each day upon which they were present at drill. 

" But it is only necessary to glance at this confusion of regular and 
auxiliary forces which existed at this period. There were regular regiments 
for general service, regular regiments for European service, regular regiments 
for home service, invalid companies, and other corps for garrisons at home 
and abroad, Militia, provisional Corps, Fencible corps, Yeomanry, Volunteers, 
and Associations, to be satisfied that the Ministry had never really grappled 
with the problem of national defence. Such a multiplicity of denominations 
might be construed to indicate activity, but its true signification is poverty 
of thought and of power in organisation." 

But, nevertheless, the so-called activity continued, and we read that on 
May 26th, 1798, the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, the Norwich Military 
Association, and the Lynn Volunteers, with other corps of a similar 
description, were inspected by General Garth, who expressed in the most 
flattering terms his approbation of the manner in which they went through 
their evolutions. 

Norwich Mercury^ June 30th, 1798, mentions that his Majesty has 
been graciously pleased to accept the offer of the Taverham Hundred to 
raise a corps of Cavalry, under the command of the Rev. William Burton 
of Horsford. 

I can, however, find no further mention of this corps, and in all 
probability the Bishop vetoed Mr. Burton becoming a member of the Church 
militant. Evidently from the enclosed correspondence, the principal land- 
owner in the district was unwilling to contribute to the fund which it was 
necessary to raise for the formation of the corps. At any rate, the corps 
never had an existence. 

Horsford. June 29th 1798. 
I have taken the liberty of addressing your Ladyship to inform you 
of the Resolutions of your Tenants at this place and to request your 
Ladyship will have the goodness to contribute towards raising a fund for 
the relief of such of your Tenants by whom the patriotic spirit of arming, 
clothing etc will be felt most burdensome — 

I have taken the liberty of enclosing you a copy of the Ld Lieut's 
letter to me upon the subject & have the honor to be 

your Ladyships 

most obed sert 
Right Hon Lady Dacres Wm BURTON 

To be left at White Hart Vicar of Horsford. 

Romford 
Essex. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 798. 95 

Copy of letter from Lord Townshend to Rev. Mr. Burton : — 

Weymouth Street, 25th June. 

Sir 

I laid the resolutions of the Parishes of St Faiths and Horsford, 

for raising a Corps of Cavalry before the Secretary of State, & have the 

pleasure to inform you that I reed a letter from Mr Dundas informing 

me that His Majesty has been graciously pleased to accept of the same, 

and to express himself highly gratified with this additional proof of the 

loyalty of his subjects in the County of Norfolk, and Mr Dundas observes 

that it is hoped that the Bishop of the Diocese will not object to your 

service to command the sd corps of Cavalry 

I remain Sir 

Your Hum. sert 

TOWNSHEND 
Rev Wm Burton 

The Bishop has given his assent to the business — 

A copy of the Resolutions of the Inhabitants of Horsford and St. Faith's 
and of the whole Taverham Hundred : — 

^ Resolved ist. that the said Inhabitants do form themselves into a Corps 
of Cavalry under the Command of Wm Burton Clerk & George Barber Gent 
— the rest of the Officers to be chosen by ballot of the Corps — 

'' 2nd. that this Corps do agree to clothe themselves at their own expence 
find themselves in horses, saddles, bridles &c. 

'' 3rd. that this Corps shall be furnished with arms by Government & that 
they meet once a week to learn their exercise. 

^ 4th. That it be understood that the Persons forming the said Corps are 
not to be considered as enlisted soldiers constituting part of the military 
establishment of this County but as learning the use of arms for the purpose 
of protecting their property, and for the preservation of peace & tranquility in 
the hundred of Taverham or within 10 miles of St Faiths or Horsford parishes 
in case of Rebellion, insurrection, civil commotion or any other cases of 
extraordinary emergency." 



Copy of the answer, which is undated and unsigned, sent by Lady Dacres 
to the Rev. W. Burton, which with the other correspondence on this subject 
was kindly placed at my disposal by Mr. Barrett Lennard, of Horsford 
Manor : — 

Sir, 

Never having had the smallest notice from either my Tenants at 
Horsford or Mr. Kent, I must consider your taking upon you such an affair 
as very unusual and therefore I cannot give my sanction. 



96 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1798. 



Horsford ; July 22, 179& 
My Lady, 

I presume from the Tenor of your Ladyship's letter which I 
yesterday received that you must be unacquainted with the necessity which 
existed some time since of arming the Country for the purpose of self defenqe 
in case of Invasion. If you had recollected how very near your estates in 
this county are situated to the Sea coast, I should rather suppose your Lady- 
ship wd have honored me with your thanks for the offer I made of leading 
your Tenants to preserve your property in case of rebellion insurrection or 
the like. 

You must however pardon me, if after having received his Majestys 
sanction and thanks for it, I did not think it necessary to request your Lady- 
ships permission for joining such a Corps, particularly when the number of 
your Tenants is so small & out of that small number one only has had the 
honor of having his name enrolled on the list. I should have been extremely 
sorry to have omitted any mark pf respect due to your Ladyship & therefore 
thought It necessary to write to you upon the subject, but am free to say, the 
answer I received from you has greatly surprized me. 

I have the Honor to be 

Your Ladyships most obed sert 

WILLIAM BURTON. 

Right Hon Lady Dacres: 

Belhouse, 

Romford. Essex 

"On the 30 August 179S Lady Bacon presented colours from the 
Angel balcony to the Yarmouth Yeomanry Cavalry, with which they 
proceeded to the Parish Church, where the colours were consecrated at 
the altar and a sermon preached by the Rev. Lovick-Cooper. At 12 
they took their horses and paraded in the Market Place, and then went 
to the Denes to exercise. At 4 o'clock they went to the Angel to 
partake of a dinner given them by their Captain Sir Edmund Bacon." 
— YouelPs Diary. 

The Mercury of October 6th. 1798. relates :—" The two troops of Holk- 
ham volunteer cavalry, commanded by Major Coke, received their standard 
from the hands of Mrs. Coke. At eleven in the morning the troops 
proceeded to the chapel, where the standard was consecrated by the 
Rev Henry Crowe, sen. At twelve o'clock the troops were drawn up 
on the South lawn, within a short distance of the house, when with 
some ceremony, the standard was given into the hands of Captain 



Standard of the Yarmouth Voluntebr Cavalry, 1798. 

iHthepossttsioHOfSir P.I.aton.Bart.,0/ Ormtiby MaU.Gt. Yarmoidh. 



Standard of the Holkham Yeomanr" 

1 of tht EiiH of LiUtlltr. Holkkam. Norfolk. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1798. 97 



Edmund Rolfe. After the ceremony, the troops were entertained by 
their commanding officer, Major Coke, in Holkham House." 

Norwich Mercury^ Oct 20th, 1798. 

" The 6th or Norfolk regiment of fencible cavalry, commanded by the 
Hon. Colonel Harbord, were drawn up in the Barrack-yard, Piers-hill, 
Scotland, in honour of the unequalled victory atchieved by Admiral Nelson, 
who dates his nativity from the same county to which the regiment belongs. 
The word was given by Lieutenant Colonel Astley, Member for the county 
of Norfolk ; and the regiment fired three excellent vollies, and expressed 
their joyful feelings by loud acclamations of applause. In the evening 
the barracks were brilliantly illuminated ; on the front of the officers 
pavilion, under the Royal Arms, there appeared in large illuminated 
characters — 

"The Norfolk Hero and British navy. 

'* At the gateway of the barracks, a beautiful triumphal arch was formed, 
of oak boughs, fancifully interspersed with variegated lamps, which had a 
charming effect." 

The War Office contains no lists of officers for Norfolk for the year 
1798, but this is not to be wondered at ; as Fortescue, in his " History of 
the British Army,"* remarks: — 

^' It is significant of the inefficiency of the civil administration of the 
War Office that information concerning the Yeomanry in these years is 
both scanty and untrustworthy. From such information as I can glean from 
the records of the War Office, the Yeomanry Cavalry in Great Britain in 
1798 counted a total of one hundred and sixty- three troops ; but the entries 
are certainly incomplete, for the official list for 1800 shows a total of two 
hundred and one corps, with an aggregate of four hundred troops, for 
Great Britain alone. According to a return of January 1801 the nominal 
strength of the Yeomanry or Volunteer Cavalry in the three kingdoms was 
close upon twenty-four thousand men, exclusive of officers ; but it is added 
that at least one-third should be deducted from this total, which would 
reduce it to sixteen thousand, and it may be doubted whether in actual 
practice the force could have produced above twelve thousand fit for service. 
Besides these there were local Associations of Cavalry numbering sixty- 
nine corps in all, of which the great majority consisted of a single troop 
only." 

* Vol. IV., page 892. 

G 



98 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 798-9. 

The following is a return showing the number of Yeomanry at this 
time in the county accepted by his Majesty. 



Hingham 


60 


Norwich 


SO 


East Dereham 


SO 


Blofield 


50 


Tunstead 


SO 


South Erpingham 


50 


Yarmouth 


40 


Clackclose 


50 


Loddon 


SO 


Holkham 


100 


Total 550 









In the course of the year 1799^ the principal causes of alarm, both 
foreign and domestic, had in a great degree passed away. 

The late royal visit to Norwich recalls the circumstance under which 
the Duke of York, Prince Frederick Augustus, the burly, blustering, 
good-natured son of Greorge III., passed through the city in the year 
1799. His Royal Highness was Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, 
and was about as incompetent a soldier as it was possible to conceive. 
In 1793 h^ showed his military incapacity when commanding an expedition 
to the Netherlands against the French, and again in 1799, when he and his 
army were badly beaten, first at Bergen, and next before Alkmaer. The 
Duke, after the latter disaster, entered into a convention, by which his army 
was exchanged for six thousand French and Dutch prisoners in England. 
The defeated troops landed at Yarmouth in the month of October. An 
officer of the Guards arrived post haste at Norwich on the 28th, and 
apprised Major-General Loftus, then in command of the district, that the 
city would be the first halting-place on the line of march. Orders were 
at once given to the Royal Anglesea and South Essex Regiments of 
Militia, at that time quartered here, to march to the neighbouring towns 
and villages in order to make room for the returning troops, and the 
Mayor (Mr. John Herring), with commendable promptitude, not only gave 
directions for proper arrangements to be made for the reception of the 
soldiers, but saw personally that his orders were carried out. At about 
eight o'clock the same evening, the Brigade of Grenadier Guards, eight 
hundred strong, marched in under the command of Col. Wynyard, and 
were as speedily as possible billeted at the various inns and beerhouses. 
Late on the following night four hundred more of the Guards, com- 
manded by Col. Archer, entered the city by torchlight, and on the 
next day and night they were succeeded by the 9th Regiment of Foot, 
consisting of 560 men, and the 79th (a Scotch corps) of 470 men. All 
the troops who arrived at night were met at Bishop Bridge and escorted 
into the city by the light of flambeaux which the Mayor had ordered 
the constables to provide. Greatly to their credit, the innkeepers and 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1799. 99 



publicans received the weather-beaten and travel -stained soldiers with 
much hospitality. The Guards, after a day's rest, proceeded en route to 
London. On November ist the remainder of the 79th (470 men^ the 
49th (430), and the Coldstream Guards (460) arrived, and after one 
night's stay resumed their march. Altogether 3,700 infantry had been 
provided for, and preparations were then made for receiving the Cavalry 
and the Artillery. At Yarmouth there was such a lack of accommodation 
that the men on landing were quartered in the Theatre and other public 
buildings, and some of the cavalry, for want of stabling, had to bivouac 
under the trees in the churchyard. The Duke of York and several 
distinguished officers, who had been engaged in the expedition, arrived 
at Norwich during the first week of November, but the presence of his 
Royal Highness was unnoticed by the citizens. In the course of the 
week the 7th (214 men), the nth (218), the 15th (184), and the i8th 
Light Dragoons and Royal Artillery were quartered in the city, together 
with the 1st (670), 23rd (482), 25th (610), 29th (580;, and 85th (587) 
Regiments of Foot. 

Among the wounded was Col. Cunningham, who had sustained 
dreadful injuries at the Battle of Bergen on the 19th September. His 
lower jaw had been shot away, and his hand shattered by a ball at 
the moment that he was putting an apple to his mouth. "He received 
all his sustenance through a tube,'* the Norfolk Chronicle stated, '*is in 
good spirits, and can faintly articulate." The Mayor, who, as I have 
said, rendered invaluable service on this occasion, on the 17th November 
received a letter from the Duke of Portland, in which his Grace 
acknowledged ''the very humane and liberal reception offered to the 
troops, and gave him the best thanks of himself and all other members 
of the King^s Government for this meritorious conduct." On the 19th 
February, his worship was presented to the King at St James's by the 
Duke of Portland and the Right Hon. William Windham. He was also 
offered the honour of knighthood, which he declined. His memory is 
preserved by a portrait, painted by Opie, which hangs on the north 
wall in St Andrew's Hall. The artist has commemorated the particular 
service rendered by Mr. Herring by introducing in the background of 
the picture a body of troops marching up one of the Norwich streets. 

This was the last occasion on which this county regiment was to 
set foot inside the county of Norfolk for many a long year. The next 
time was when the 2nd Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment were entertained 
by the Mayor of Norwich (Lieut-Colonel J. R. Harvey) on their return 
from active service during the South African campaign, in St Andrew's 
Hall, on the 14th February, 1903. 



lOO 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 799. 



In the War Office lists for 1799, the following officers composing the 
Yeomanry Cavalry of the County of Norfolk appear : — 

I 

NORFOLK YEOMANRY CAVALRY: 17991 



ATTLBBOKOUOH TROOP 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Cornet 


Henry Francklyn 
Richard Daniels 
Richard Francis 

BLOFIBLD AMD SOUTH WALSHAM TROOP 


19 July 1798 

t» »t n 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


James B. Burroughes 
William Heath 
John Sibell 

CLACKCLOSB TROOP 


18 March 1795 
» I* » 

M t» >• 


Major Corns 
Captain 
Capt Lieut. 
Lieut 
Cornet 


Thomas Hare 
John Thurlow Bering 
James Hare 
Edmund Saflfery 
John Creasy 
William Lee 

EAST DEREHAM TROOP 


23 Nov 1796 

>t W II 

25 Jan 1798 

It N 1* 

5 July 1797 

25 Jan 1798 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


Thos. Wodehouse 
John Hyde 
John Thome 

ERPINGHAM AND EYNE8FORD TROOP 


30 Oct 1794 
23 June 1796 

II II II 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


William Earle Bulwer 
John HoUey 
George Wymer 

FREEBRIDGE LYNN TROOP 


16 March 1797 

M >l II 
II M It 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


Joseph Taylor 
John Lloyd 
Thos. Jackson 

FREEBRIDGE AND SIflTHDON TROOP 


19 July 1798 

» ti II 
II II II 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


Henry Styleman 
James Coldham 
Charles Mordaunt 


19 July 1798 
II II II 

91 II II 



Lieut. WILLIAM PALGRAVE, 

Yarmouth Voluntbkr Cavalry, 

1799. 



i 



RjnTJrtit af tM YeamoMart Cjsojt^ jf jrir^Li^ : ••;<:. 






Ti iLrT r"^ 






» 



Martfs Fcikss SJsxtcn zn Aj^^ i^t-J 



Jciui Ward 



Jicta Soyth 



^Ft^ 



•• ▼ 



Xs^cr Com' Geocgc; 



Scr Itartia BL FcCccv Bart. 






yLaucf HiL :35 A-ur; i^^ 



]zhn. Hafvcj 15 Jjne 17^7 



John Ives 23 Xicdt 




r-z 'iiT r'-n^ 



:r -. 



£-^ Ojn-J. i-^c 



Sir EifTnnyf Baoco, Bart. i Aocf 177^ 

WLlzam Filgme ac Jane I'-^iJ 

Rkaard ¥t 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1799. 



lOI 





HINGHAM TROOP 




Captain 


Hamond Alpe 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


James Murray 


28 Dec 1796 


Cornet 


Philip Heath 


n » »t 


Adjutant 


James Murray 


31 May 1798 




ROLRHAM TROOP 


» 


Major Com« 


Thomas William Coke 


19 July 1798 


Captain 


Edmund Rolfe 


>* i> i> 


Lieut 


George Hogg 


»• i» 1} 


n 


Martin Polices Rishton 


29 Aug 1798 


Comet 


Jamos Gardner Bloom 


19 July „ 


n 


John Ward 

LODDON TROOP 


i> »» » 


Captain 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut. 


William Carpenter 


n i» !• 


Comet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


)f )» i> 


Major ComK 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


George Beauchamp 


ff f> » 


» 


Sir Martin B. Folkes, Bart 


V n »i 


Lieut 


William Mason 


29 Sept 1794 


i> 


Edward Parry 


30 Oct „ 


Cornet 


Martin B. Folkes 


18 Nov 179s 


i> 


William Becher 


30 Nov 1796 


II 


Money Hill 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE VOLUNTEERS 


29 Aug 1798 


Captain 


John Harvey 


15 June 1797 


Lieut 


Roger Hayes 


»» »i » 


Cornet 


John Ives 

8HROPHAM ANf> GUILTCROSS TROOP 


23 March 1797 


Captain 


William Colhoun 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


Jacob Whittington 


>* i> )i 


Comet 


Robert Colhoun 

TUNSTBAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


1) n i> 


Captain 


Charles Laton 


17 April 1795 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


n » M 


Comet 


George Cubitt 

YARMOUTH TROOP 


» >* >» 


Captain 


Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart. 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut. 


William Palgrave 


20 June 1798 


Comet 


Richard Ferrier 


If M n 



I02 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1800. 



1800 
In February, 1800, a Committee of the House of Commons reported 
against the practice adopted in many places of delivering flour and bread 
to the poor at reduced prices, and recommended that all charity and 
parochial relief should be given, as far as practicable, in any other articles 
rather than bread, flour and money, and that soup, rice, potatoes, or other 
substitutes should be given. General Money, who we have found so 
energetic in all the military affairs of the county, published a pamphlet at 
this time, in which he attributed the high price of provisions — not only to 
their scarcity, but to the great circulation of paper money, and the 
eagerness of farmers to obtain new leases upon any terms — alleging that 
no advance of rent or any hard times restrained them. 

In consequence of the public calamity of two bad harvests in 
succession, the autumn of 1800 was marked by a general scarcity of the 
necessaries of life, to a degree which gave rise to the most serious 
apprehensions; the public distress was taken advantage of by democratic 
agitation to stir up those embers of sedition which were known to be 
widely spread, though hitherto kept down by the support afforded to 
Government by the well-affected. The most inflammatory placards were 
conspicuously posted up, calling upon the people to save themselves from 
starvation, by resistance to the measures of the Government ; and in 
consequence, the bakers' shops in several parts of the country were 
attacked, several of which were demolished. 

The extent to which this prevailed is hard to realise now, but the 
Stale Bread Act of 1800, forbidding bakers to sell their loaves till they 
were at least twenty-four hours old ; the resolution of the Nottingham 
farmers to let their wheat go for 8oj., though the market price was 140;., 
and the offer by the Grovernment of a bounty on the cultivation of 
potatoes, are sufficient testimony to the frequent shortage of provisions, 
apart from the rioting which actually took place in various large towns, 
and especially on the 15 th of September, 1800, in London, when many 
shops and offices of corn merchants in Mark Lane were wrecked. It can 
be hardly doubted that these scenes would have been reproduced all over 
England but for the existence of an efficient mounted police in the shape 
of the Yeomanry, and the confidence inspired in the magistrates, by the 
knowledge that they had behind them in case of need a force on which 
they could depend. The Militia were not reliable ; indeed, no local levies 
could be that were drawn from the same class as those who were 
disturbing the peace ; but, as has been shown, the Yeomanry troopers 
then, as now, came from the middle classes, and it is the only force of 
any kind in which for a hundred years the middle classes have consented 
to enlist 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1800. 103 



The exemption from service in the Militia was 'a substantial privilege, 
though there were many in the Yeomanry, who, perhaps, from having 
already provided substitutes, were not liable to service in the Militia. 

The exemptions from taxes on horses and hair-powder were welcome, no 
doubt, but could hardly have influenced many doubting recruits, and the 
pay could not have been the attraction. 

One of the most important branches of the defensive service raised 
during the time of the great national scare was the Auxiliary Cavalry. 
This, as we have seen, consisted of Yeomanry and Fencible Cavalry. The 
former were raised within particular districts or counties, and were 
composed of the gentry and farmers, or such other persons recommended 
according to a plan approved of by the King, or by the Lords- 
Lieutenant under authority from his Majesty. The officers received 
commissions from the Sovereign, no levy money was given, and each 
member of the corps provided his own horse ; but the arms and 
accoutrements were supplied at the public expense. These corps were 
exercised only at particular times fixed by warrant from his Majesty, or 
by the approbation of the Lords-Lieutenant They were liable to be 
embodied or called out of their respective counties only by special 
direction from his Majesty in case of actual appearance of invasion ; and 
the High SherifT could call upon them to act within their county, or in 
adjacent counties, for the suppression of riots and tumults. Norfolk was 
especially strong in its Yeomanry Cavalry, and the force, consisting as it 
did of well-mounted men who had a perfect knowledge of the district, 
would have been capable of rendering very useful service in the face of an 
enemy. The Yeomanry Regiments exist under very similar conditions at 
present, but the Fencible Cavalry were disbanded at the end of the great 
war. This force was entirely distinct from the Yeomanry, and was 
composed of a different class of men, the ranks being recruited principally 
from the labouring population. Each troop numbered from fifty to eighty 
men, who were liable to serve only during the war, and within the 
Kingdom. The officers had temporary rank only^ and were not entitled to 
half-pay. The arms, clothing, and accoutrements were furnished by 
Government, but the levy money was found by the person who raised the 
troops, and who also provided the horses. For the latter, however, the 
Government contract price was allowed. The person who, on these terms, 
raised two troops had the rank of major ; four troops, that of lieut-colonel ; 
and the raising of six troops carried with it the rank of colonel. While 
the Yeomanry served in their own immediate districts, the Fencible Cavalry 
were shifted from one portion of the Kingdom to another. 

Colonel the Hon. W. A. Harbord raised in Norfolk a very smart 



1 04 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 800. 



regiment of Fencible Cavalry, who after doing duty for some months in 
Norwich marched to Carlisle, and thence to Scotland. The corps, after an 
absence from the county of about six years, were disbanded on May loth, 
1800. 

The Norfolk Chronicle of May 17th, 1800, thus records the 
circumstance : — 

" On Saturday last the Norfolk Regiment of Fencible Cavalry commanded 
by the Hon. Col. Harbord, were disbanded at Dereham, by Major-General Lord 
Charles Fitzroy. Parties from the nth, 14th, i6th, and i8th Light Dragoons 
attended to receive the horses, all being anxious to obtain the greatest number 
from the high character they bore, and which were allowed to be in remarkably 
high condition, notwithstanding they had just completed a march of between 
500 and 600 miles. So great cordiality existed between the colonel and the 
regiment that they parted with mutual regret, and we can have no doubt of the 
pleasure their parents and friends must have experienced at receiving them 
again, after an absence of six years in the service of their country. This 
regiment very early volunteered their services to Ireland, and afterwards to any 
part of Europe, and it would be injustice to Col. Harbord and the officers not to 
add that they had not only reached a perfect degree of military excellence, but 
had likewise been uniformly distinguished for their orderly conduct'' 

Lord Suffield writing to me, in answer to an enquiry of mine, on 27th Oct, 
1907, says: — "The arms and accoutrements of the regiment were stored in the 
servants' hall at Gunton for many years ; but were eventually sent to the Tower 
of London, I think in the time of my father." In all probability the standards 
were also lodged in the same place. 

The officers composing the Norfolk Fencible Cavalry on disbandment 
were as under : — 

ID April, 1794 



Colonel 


Hon. W. Assheton Harbord. 


Lieut-Col. 


Jacob Henry Astley 


Major 


John Smith 


Captain 


John Varlo 




Augustus Duggan 




William Matthew (s) 


Capt Lieut 


Robert Alexander 


Lieut. 


Alexander Davidson 




John Thomlinson 




William Sherwin Thomas 




James Gaze 




Thomas William J. Griffiths 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1800. 105 



Cornet George Cressall 

John Bryant 
Thomas C. Grainger 
Jer. Nisbett Browne 
Jeffery Killett Chandler 
Rob. Alexander 
Chaplain William Churchill 

Adjutant Robert Alexander 

Surgeon James Bryant 



Rules and Orders 

FOR THE 

LoDDON Yeomanry. 



As the most perfect uniformity of dress will highly add to the appearance 
and credit of the troop, it is expected that every volunteer appears neat, both 
in respect to person and accoutrements, on field days. The white halter, front 
of bridle, belt and the inside of the tops of the boots, to be regular cleaned with 
pipe clay ; no oil to be used for the boots, they must be well blacked and 
polished ; ditto spur leathers ; the reins of the bridle to be oiled close to 
the bit, which is to be kept perfectly bright ; also buckles, spurs, and stirrup 
irons. The waistcoat, breeches, and inside of the jacket, may be cleaned with 
pipe clay. The serjeant, if required, will shew any Gentleman the method of 
putting on the accoutrements, and cleaning the various articles. No Gentlemen 
to wear the dress found by the country but on duty ; this order is meant to 
preserve the uniformity of appearance. 

The length of the stirrups, bridle, or crupper, must not be altered on any 
account after they are fitted. In respect to the hair, it must be regulated by 
the following method ; Those Gentlemen with hair long enough to tie^ will 
please to wear it clubbed, the length of the former given them ; the rosette to be 
put on after the hair is dressed, and not powdered ; those with short Itair are 
requested to keep it well cut behind, and the sides pomatumed back. Those 
with wigs are also requested to wear them with a single curl, the sides 
pomatumed back. Every Grentlemen must wear a frill to his shirt, with a hole 
near the top to let the hook through which closes the jacket 

The next thing requested is perfect silence in the ranks, without it, no man 
can learn his duty ; nor must any one correct his neighbour, as that always 
occasions noise and confusioa Any Gentlemen offending in this article must 



1 06 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 8cx). 



forfeit sixpence ; and that the utmost good order may prevail in the troop, it is 
recommended that, if required, an enquiry may be made to consist of four 
volunteers and one officer^ having authority to fine or break. In the last case, if the 
sentence is approved of by the commanding Officer, the volunteer so reduced 
must immediately deliver up his arms^ clothes and accoutrements. 

The business of inspection must also be attended to, and, as it will take up 
much time if done by the officers only, two Serjeants and two corporals will be 
appointed in the troop, who will regularly inspect their different squads, report 
all deficiencies to the cornet, the cornet to the lieutenant, and he reports to the 
captain ; this must be done before the general parade. 

Should illness prevent any volunteer from attending, he must inform his 
Serjeant or corporal of it, otherwise he will be deemed absent without leave ; all 
other leave of absence must come directly from the commanding Officer. 

It is also recommended that the troop shall dine tc^ether once a months on 
which day every Gentleman's account will be settled, and all forfeits paid. Any 
volunteer not attending the dinner to forfeit the money due to him for exercise 
during the month, unless prevented by illness. 



Rules 

to be observed by the 

LoDDON Yeomanry 
IN Riding. 



The Volunteer to sit in the hollow of his saddle ; the thigh flat, and 1^ 
well back, so as to bring the shoulder, elbow and heel in a line ; the head up, 
shoulders well back, and the body steady ; the elbows not to shake ; the 
bottom of the stirrup irons to be just below the ancle bone ; the bridle hand 
steady; the knuckles to the mane, and fingers to the body; the whip hand 
steady ; whip upright ; the hand about three inches from the thigh ; the foot 
must not, on any account be home in the stirrup, but press on the ball of the 
foot, raising the toe and sinking the heel. 

The Commanding Officer also recommends the Gentlemen to accustom 
themselves to ride the full length on the road, attending particularly to keep 
the leg back, and elbows close, by which means they will soon acquire a 

firm seat. 

Mr. CARPENTER, Lieutenant 

Mr. KERRISON, Jun. Cornet 
Printed by K Bacon, Norwich. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 800. 



107 



NORFOLK YEOMANRY CAVALRY: 1800. 



ATTLEBOROUGH TROOP 



Captain 


Henry Francklyn 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


Richard Daniels 


»f >> »» 


Cornet 


Richard Francis 

BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSHAM TROOP 


» H >f 


Captain 


James B. Burroughes 


18 March 1795 


Lieut 


WiUiam Heath 


>i i» •• 


Cornet 


John Sibell 

CLACKCLOSB TROOP 


f> H }» 


Major Com' 


Thomas Hare 


23 Nov 1796 


Captain 


John Thurlow Dering 


»t »» >» 


Capt. Lieut. 


James Hare 


25 Jan 1798 


Lieut. 


Edmund SafFery 


}) )i >t 


Cornet 


John Crfta.sy 


5 July 1797 


i> 


William Lee 


25 Jan 1798 


Adjutant 


George Sneid 

DBRBHAIf TROOP 


24 Oct 1799 


Captain 


Thos Wodehouse 


30 Oct 1794 


Lieut. 


John Hyde 


23 June 1796 


Cornet 


Thomas Munnings 

VRPINGHAM AND BYNSFORD TROOP 


3 May 1799 


Captain 


William Earle Bulwer 


16 March 1797 


Lieut. 


John Holley 


»» >» »> 


Cornet 


George Wymer 

FRBEBRIDGB LYNN TROOP 


>f 9» II 


Captain 


Joseph Taylor 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


John Lloyd 


>f »» t) 


Cornet 


Thos. Jackson 

FRBEBRIDGB AND SMITHDON TROOP 


'1 »i >» 


Captain 


Henry Styleman 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


James Coldham 


>♦ » >» 


Cornet 


Henry Blencowes 

HINGHAM TROOP 


16 Aug 1799 


Captain 


Hamond Alpe 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


James Murray 


28 Dec 1796 


Cornet 


Philip Heath 


9> » » 


Adjutant 


James Murray 


31 May 1798 



io8 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Nor/oik, 1 800. 





HOLKHAM TtOOP 




Major Coin« 


Thos William Coke 


19 July 1798 


Captain 


Edmund Rolfe 


ft H )* 


Lieut. 


George Hogg 


l» l» If 


»» 


Martin Folkes Riston 


29 Aug 1798 


Cornet 


Jas. Gardner Bloom 


19 July 1798 




John Ward 


ft ft ft 




LODDON TROOP 


« 


Captain 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


•1 If ft 


Comet 


Thos Alday Kerrison 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


ft ft ft 


Major. Com< 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


Greorge Beauchamp 


ft f« »i 


»> 


Sir Martin B. Folkes, Bart 


ft ft «t 


Lieut. 


William Mason 


29 Sept 1794 


» 


William Becher 


3 May 1799 


Cornet 


Martin B. Folkes 


18 Nov 1795 


t> 


Money Hill 


29 Aug 1798 


;t 


Nicholas John Raven 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE VOLUNTEERS 


3 May 1799 


Captain 


John Harvey 


15 June 1797 


Lieut 


Roger Hayes 


ft ff ') 


Comet 


John Ives 

SHROPHAM AND GUILTCROS8 TROOP 


23 March 1797 


Captain 


William Colhoun 


19 July 1798 


Lieut 


Jacob Whittington 


ft ?f fi 


Cornet 


Robert Colhoun 

TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


tf tl •! 


Captain 


Charles Laton 


17 April 1795 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


tt tf ft 


Cornet 


George Cubitt 

YARMOUTH TROOP 


ft ft tf 


Captain 


Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart. 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut. 


William Palgrave 


20 June 1798 


Cornet 


Richard Ferrier 


II 11 M 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1801. 109 



1 801. 

The course of events on the Continent of Europe, and especially the 
temporary pacification which succeeded the victory of Marengo, had left 
the French Ruler at full liberty to direct the whole of his energies, with 
the immense resources of revolutionary France, and her allies under his 
control, against the very existence of Great Britain. His designs upon her 
Colonial Empire in the East, by means of the occupation of Egypt, which 
had been checked in the outset by the navy of England under Nelson, at 
the Nile, and under Sir Sidney Smith at Acre, received their final dis- 
comfiture by the British Army under Sir Ralph Abercromby at 
Alexandria, in the spring of 1801. This year was also signalised by the 
sanguinary victory at Copenhagen, which paralyzed the hostile attempts of 
the naval confederacy of the Northern powers, which Bonaparte had 
succeeded in organizing against England. Under these circumstances the 
First Consul determined upon making the most formidable preparations 
for a direct and immediate attack upon the shores of England, and 
extensive armaments were ordered to be fitted out at every harbour along 
the French coast. At Boulogne especially an immense force was con- 
centrated, the hills were covered with numerous camps and the harbour 
crowded with flat-bottomed boats and floating batteriea 

On the 1st August, Lord Hobart, the Secretary of State, addressed a 
circular letter to all the Lords - Lieutenant of the several counties 
requesting that all Volunteers and Yeomanry Corps should be kept in a 
state of readiness for immediate service, Every effort was made then to 
bring the recruits into a state of fitness for service. In the midst of these 
preparations, and shortly after the daring attack made by Lord Nelson on 
the armament in Boulogne harbour, which was attended with no results 
commensurate with the loss of gallant officers and men on both sides, a 
disposition was unexpectedly evinced by the First Consul to put an end to 
the hostilities between the two countries, by a treaty of peace on 
admissible terms. These overtures having been met by a corresponding 
disposition on the part of the British Government, the preliminary articles 
were signed on the loth of October, 1801. 

Norfolk Chronicle, August loth, 1801. 

"On Monday sennight the South Erpingham and Eynesford troop of 
Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Bulwer, met the Cromer and 
North Walsham corps of Infantry, under the command of Captains Mickle- 
burgh, ^nd Lloyd, for field exercise at Southreps, when having gone through 
their different evolutions with precision that did them credit and testifying 



no The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1801. 



their determination to render every service in their power in case of an 
invasion, the corps were dismissed and repaired to the Bowh'ng Green to 
partake of refreshments provided for them« and the officers were invited to a 
handsome cold collation at the Revd Mr Smitfa'a" 



NORFOLK SMUGGLERS. 



Here is another record of the doings of Norfolk smugglers. At one 
o'clock on the morning of December 28th, 1801, Mr. Tooly and Mr. Skidmore* 
two excise-officers stationed at Norwich, were patrolling the country in the 
neighbourhood of Cawston, in company with a mounted party of the 3rd 
Dragoons, when they fell in with a party of smugglers, working their way 
inland from the coast. They had with them six horses and five carts, laden 
with fifty-three casks of Geneva and 600 lbs. of leaf and short-cut tobacco. 
The excise-men and the soldiers experienced very little difficulty in seizing 
the horses, carts, and contraband goods, which were given up without much 
resistance. The carts, guarded by the escort, were proceeding towards 
Norwich at a leisurely pace, when just as they were nearing Horsford, a 
body of upwards of thirty desperadoes, armed with short guns and other 
unlawful weapons, made a determined attack upon the representatives of 
the law. A bloody fight ensued. One of the Dragoons was shot in the 
shoulder, and Mr. Skidmore, who was seated on the leading cart, was first 
fired at, and then thrown upon the ground and terribly mauled. Meanwhile, 
the cavalry had recovered from the slight disorder into which they had 
been thrown, opened fire upon the smugglers, killed two of them, and 
severely wounded several others. The smugglers, however, succeeded in 
rescuing two horses, two carts, and fifteen casks of Geneva, with which they 
beat a retreat 



Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1801. 

ATTLEBOROUGH TROOP 

Captain Henry Francklyn 19 July 1798 

Lieut Richard Daniels „ „ „ 

Cornet . Richard Francis nun 

BLOFIBLD AMD SOUTH WALSHAU TROOP 

Captain James B. Burroughes 18 March 1795 

Lieut William Heath „ „ „ 

Comet John Sibell 



») >» 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1801. 



Ill 





CLACKCLOSE TROOP 




Major Com'- 


Thomas Hare 


23 Nov 1796 


Captain 


Thomas Thurlow Dering 


>• If t» 


Capt Lieut 


James Hare 


25 Jan 1798 


Lieut. 


Edmund SafTery 


II II 1* 


Cornet 


John Creasy 


S July ^797 


» 


William Lee 


25 Jan 1798 


Adjutant 


George Sneid 

EAST DEREHAM TROOP 


24 Oct 1799 


Captain 


Thos. Wodehouse 


30 Oct 1794 


Lieut. 


John Hyde 


23 June 1796 


Comet 


Thomas Munnings 

ERPINGHAM AND EYNESFORD TROOP 


3 May 1799 


Captain 


William Earle Bulwer 


16 March 1797 


Lieut 


John Holley 


i» >i »i 


Comet 


George Wymer 

FREEBRIDGE LYNN TROOP 


II II II 


Captain 


Joseph Taylor 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


John Lloyd 


i» 1* It 


Comet 


Samuel Sayer 

FREEBRIDGE AND SMITHDON TROOP 


26 June 1800 


Captain 


Henry Styleman 


19 July 1798 


Lieut. 


James Coldham 


II II II 


Comet 


Henry Blencowes 

HINGHAM TROOP 


16 Aug 1799 


Captain 


Hamond Alpe 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


James Murray 


28 Dec 1796 


Cornet 


Philip Heath 


II i» ti 


Adjutant 


James Murray 

HOLXHAM TROOP 


31 May 1798 


Major Com'- 


Thos. William Coke 


19 July 1798 


Captain 


Edmund Rolfe 


1* II II 


Lieut 


George Hogg 


II II t* 


>• 


Martin Folkes Rishton 


29 Aug 1798 


Cornet 


Jas. Gardner Bloom 


19 July 




John Ward 


II II 



112 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 80 1-2. 





NORFOLK RANGERS 




Major Com«- 


Geoi^e, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


George Beauchamp 


)« M 99 


»f 


Sir Martin B. Polices Bart 


II l> !• 


Lieut 


William Mason 


»l >• . . >• 


It 


William Becher 


3 May 1799 


Cornet 


Martin B. Polices 


18 Nov 1795 


i> 


Money Hill 


29 Aug 1798 


II 


Nicholas John Raven 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE VOLUNTEERS 


3 May 1799 


Captain 


John Harvey 


15 June 1797 


Lieut. 


Roger Hayes 


i> » >» 


Cornet 


John Ives 

LODDON TROOP 


23 March 1797 


Captain 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


ti i> *i 


Cornet 


Thos, Alday Kerrison 

SHROPHAU AND GUILTCROSS TROOP 


>i i« II 


Captain 


William Colhoun 


19 July 1798 


Lieut 


Jacob Whittington 


II II «i 


Cornet 


Robert Colhoun 

TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


II II •! 


Captain 


Charles I«aton 


17 April 1795 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


II !• f> 


Cornet 


George Cubitt 

YARMOUTH TROOP 


II 11 »l 


Captain 


Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


William Palgrave 


20 June 1798 


Cornet 


Richard Perrier 


II 1* II 



1802. 

Norfolk Chronicle^ January 30th, 1802. 

**The following letter signed individually by the Norfolk Cavalry of 
Norfolk Rangers, has been addressed to their Major, the Marquis of 
Townshend. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 802. 113 



''January 1802 
" My Lord, 

''conceiving the internal tranquility of the kingdonii and the 
preservation of our excellent constitution, to be inseperably connected 
with the execution of the established laws of the country, we whose 
names are hereto subscribed, do voluntarily offer the continuance of our 
services in the corps under your Lordships command, without pay or 
allowance in aid and support of the civil power, when ever we may be 
called upon to perform that duty ; and we request that your Lordship 
will be pleased to communicate our sentiments of true attachments to 
his Majestys person and goverment, and to tender the offer of the con- 
tinuance of our services for his Majesty's Royal approbation. 

We understand, this, as well as the offers of the continuance of 
service of other Yeomanry corps in the county, will be forwarded to 
Goverment upon the signature of the definitive Treaty of Peace." 



As would be supposed, such places as Norwich and Yarmouth were 
in the front rank of those who readily offered their services, and as we 
have just seen were early enrolled. 

In January, 1802, the non-commissioned officers and privates of the 
Blofield and South Walsham troop of Yeomanry Cavalry offered to 
continue their services to the Government, and thanked the officers for 
the unremitting and polite attention paid to them since the establish- 
ment in 1794. 



Norfolk Chronicle, April 24th, 1802. 

"Copy of a circular letter from the Right Hon. Lord Hobart, one of 
his Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, to the Lord Lieut, of the 
county of Norfolk. 

"Downing Street 
"April 19th 1802. 
"My Lord, 

"in consequence of the conclusion of the definitive treaty of 
peace, I have received his Majesty's commands to convey his warmest 
acknowledgements to the several corps of Yeomanry and Volunteer 
Cavalry, and Volunteers and Associated Infantry, and to express his 
satisfaction with which he contemplates the steadfast attachment to the 
established constitution of the country, and the unshaken loyalty and 
affection to his Person and Goverment, by which the corps have been 

H 



114 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1802. 



distinguished; and the just recollection he shall ever retain of their 
services during a period of unparalleled difficulty and danger. It is his 
Majesty's pleasure that your Lordship should signify these his sentiments 
to the commanding officers of every establishment of Yeomanry and 
Volunteer Cavalry and Volunteer Associated Infantry, within the county 
of Norfolk, to be by them communicated to their respective corps. 

"With r^ard to the Yeomanry and Volunteer Cavalry, there are 
circumstances connected with that part of the Volunteer Institution which 
have suggested the propriety of the continuance of a proportion, if not 
the whole of it during peace ; but I have the whole of it in command 
from his Majesty distinctly to explain, that he entertains no wish to 
avail himself of the present services of any persons, who, under the 
change of circumstances, may be desirous of withstanding them ; nor 
could the dissolution of any corps be looked upon as indicating an 
abatement of zeal on the part of individuals, who may consider the object 
now to be inadequate to the sacrifices to which they have hitherto cheer- 
fully consented. 

"In communicating his Majesty's pleasure upon these points to the 
several corps of Yeomanry and Volunteer Cavalry, within your county, 
your Lordship can offisr no better recommendation to them, than to 
adhere to that line of conduct by which they have deservedly acquired 
the honourable distinction of being considered as not only providing a 
resource in cases of internal commotion and disorder, but as forming an 
essential part in the defence of the county against a foreign enemy in 
circumstances of extraordinary emergency. I feel particular pleasure in 
conveying to your Lordship, upon this occasion, his Majestys gracious 
approbation of the zeal and attention with which you have discharged 
the various duties, from time to time committed to you as his Majestys 
Lieutenant for the county of Norfolk. 

" I have the honor to be etc, 

"(signed) HOBART." 

On July 4th, 1802, a number of the principal inhabitants of the 
Hundred of South Greenhoe offered to form a corps of Yeomanry Cavalry 
under the command of Robert Wilson, Esquire, late High Sheriff. 

On July 15th Major John Harvey, of the Norwich Light Horse, wrote 
to Lord Hobart : " the gentlemen I have the honour to command extend 
their services to Great Britain and are ready at any time to obey the orders 
of the general officer." 

August 1st — The Hundreds of Smithdon and Brothercross offered a 
corps of " Loyal Smithdon and Brothercross Yeomanry Cavalry," to be under 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1802. 115 



the command of William Hoste, Esq., who had served seven years in the 
Royal Horse Guards (blue). 

September 30th — The Lord Lieutenant reported that Norfolk had 
completed her quota of volunteers — six times the number of the old militia. 
But additional offers came in, and they were accepted to make up for any 
secessions. 

October 24th — ^The Norfolk Rangers Yeomanry Cavalry, under the 
command of the Marquis Townshend, expressed a desire to take duty at 
Yarmouth, and were solicitous of being the first appointed as they were the 
first corps in 1782. 

There is a return dated the loth October, 1802, which gives a list of 
the corps of Yeomanry Cavalry in Norfolk, under the terms and conditions 
specified by the Act 42nd Geo. III. 

Norfolk Rangers, Marquis Townshend, 90 

S. Erpingham and Eynsford Y.C., Capt. Bulwer, 44 

Yarmouth Y.C., CapL Palgrave, 40 

Loddon Y.C., Capt Smyth, 45 

Tunstead and Happing Y.C., Capt Laton, 44 

Norwich Light Horse, Capt Harvey, 60 

Blofield and S. Walsham Y.C., Capt Burroughes, 45 

Dereham Y.C., Capt. Hyde, 45 

Hingham Y.C., Capt AIpe, 45 

S waff ham Y.C., Capt Micklethwait, 46 

East Dereham Y.C., Capt Crisp, 39 

Lynn and Freebridge Y.C., Capt. Taylor, 36 

giving a total of 576. 



Although the preliminaries of peace between France and England 
were signed in the autumn of 180 1, the definitive treaty was not concluded 
till the spring of the following year ; the interval was spent in the protracted 
negotiations at Amiens, in the course of which the disposition displayed by 
the Ruler of France, after he had attained the first step towards monarchical 
power by being elected Consul for life, gave but faint promise of the peace 
being permanent Throughout the course of the conference, scarce a week 
elapsed in which the relations of the contracting parties were not disturbed 
by some new aggression on the part of France, at some interference with 
neighbouring states. The unprovoked attack on the independence of 
Switzerland, the arbitrary parcelling out of the several states of Northern 
Italy to form the ephemeral confederacy of the Cisalpine Republic, and 
numerous other indications of grasping and ambitious policy, whilst they 



ii6 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1802. 



threw constant difficulties in the way of the negotiators, afTorded also 
sufficient evidence that neither the ruler nor the people of France would 
be disposed to remain contented with the immense acquisitions which they 
had already made to their own territories. The peace was, notwithstanding, 
solemnly proclaimed in London on April 29th, 1802, and the ceremony was 
succeeded by demonstrations of joy throughout the Kingdom. 

Upon this event being proclaimed, the Norfolk Yeomanry and 
Volunteers, in common with the other corps of a similar nature throughout 
Great Britain, received the thanks of his Majesty, and also the thanks of 
both houses of Parliament 

The peace certainly cleared the air for a time; but the respite was a 
short one, for in less than twelve months war alarms were sounding over 
Europe, and the Yeomanry forces were again requisitioned. 

" Martis, 6 Die Aprilis, i8o2« 

''Resolved, nemine contradicenU. 

'* That the thanks of this house be given to the officers of the several 
corps of Yeomanry and Volunteer Cavalry and Infantry, and of the Sea 
Fencibles which have been formed in Grt Britain and Ireland, during the 
course of the War, for the seasonable and eminent services they have 
rendered to their King and Country. 

"Resolved, nemine contradicente, 

" That this house doth highly approve of and acknowledge the services 
of the Non-commissioned Officers and Men of the several corps of Yeomanry 
and Volunteer Cavalry and Infantry and of the Sea Fencibles which have 
been formed in Gt Britain and Ireland during the course of the War, and 
the same be communicated to them by the Colonels and the Commanding 
officers of the several corps, who are desired to thank them for their 
meritorious conduct 

** Ordered,— 

''That Mr Speaker do signify the said resolutions by letter to his 
Majesty's Lieutenant of each county, rising and place in Gt Britain ; and 
to his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of that part of the United Kingdom 
called Ireland. 

"J, Ley. CI, D, Dom, Com." 

The above is the thanks of the Commons to the Yeomanry and 
Volunteers, for their servicea It appeared in the Norfolk Chronicle on 
May 1st, 1802. 

The peace was actually proclaimed in London on the 29th April, 1802, 
and the ceremony was succeeded by brilliant illuminations and other 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolky 1802. 117 



demonstrations of joy in the metropolis and throughout the King[dom. The 
following from the Norfolk Chronicle of April 3rd, 1802, will give one an 
idea of how they celebrated a proclamation in those days. 

"March 30th, 1802 — In the afternoon, the Norwich Loyal Military 
Association assembled at the Hall in St Andrews. Instead of field-pieces 
and ammunition waggons, the martial divisions were preceded in the march 
from the Hall to the Market Place by two Brewers Drays, laden with six 
pieces (barrels we mean) of Norwich porter. After the Association had fired 
a feu de joie, and three excellent vol lies, and given as many hearty cheers, 
the Mayor and Aldermen returned from the Hall, preceded by the City 
R^alia, etc, entered the square and drank his Majestys health in porter. 
The contents of the six barrels or pieces were then discharged and lodged 
in the breasts of the surrounding multitude, who received the well directed 
fire with tolerable steadiness and though many were seen to fall, we are 
happy to state, that none have died of their wounds. The porter was the 
donation of Major Patteson." 



There are no lists of officers among the War Office records for the year 
1802. Probably no returns were rendered. 



CHAPTER III 
1803 to 1804. 

Renewed Hostilities with France-^ Yeomanry Reorganization — Reminiscences of 
Pepper Manby — Yeomanry perform Garrison Duty at Yarmouth — 
Inspections^ Drills, and State of Yeomanry in 1803— Resolutions of the 
Norwich Light Horse — Yeomanry formed into Regiments — False Alarm 
of Invasion at Weyboume^Inspections and Presentation of Colours to 
Yeomanry Corps — General Mone/s Address in 1804. 

For the remainder of the year 1802 and the first two months of 1803, 
the relations between France and England continued, nominally at least, to 
be friendly, and when the British Prime Minister was questioned in 
Parliament as to his confidence in the durability of the peace, he distinctly 
announced that he saw no reason to doubt its continuance. This confidence 
was not, however, of very long duration, and it was generally felt that the 
undisguised warlike preparations in France throughout the winter of 1802 
and the spring of 1803, and especially the armament and equipment going 
on in the several ports, with the augmentation of its navy, imperatively 
demanded some demonstration on the part of England beyond a mere 
request for explanation ; and accordingly on the 8th of March, 1803, a 
royal message was communicated to Parliament, ''that His Majesty con- 
sidered it expedient to adopt additional measures of precaution for the 
security of his dominions," and thereupon warrants were issued for calling 
out and embodying the militia. 

The negotiations in which the ambassadors of the two countries 
(Lord Whitworth at Paris and General Andrtossy in London) were 
respectively engaged terminated in May, and the ambassadors were 
abruptly recalled. In the same month a message was communicated to 
Parliament to a direct declaration of war, and letters of marque and reprisals 
were immediately issued. 

Neither the Government nor the people of England were unprepared 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. ^^9 

for this result. It had been very generally felt that the unsettled and 
revolutionary state of France, whose Government was then undergoing a 
process of change, could offer no securities for the continuance of peace ; 
at the same time it was notorious that the leader of that Government was 
merely taking advantage of the cessation of hostilities to mature and carry 
into effect vast plans of aggrandisement to France and destruction to 
England. The conviction, however, that an effort for the restoration of 
peace had on our part been made with sincerity and good faith had a 
powerful effect in reconciling the minds of all classes to a renewal of the 
war, which they now felt to be necessary and inevitable, and this feeling 
was strongly evinced in the burst of patriotic enthusiasm which pervaded 
all parts of the country, and in the spirit and unanimity with which 
persons of every rank and condition pressed forward with the offer of 
their services. This was responded to in every city, town, and village of 
the Kingdom, and this display of patriotism was met from the opposite 
shores by a spirit of the most rancorous animosity. 

Bonaparte had long felt that this country opposed the only barrier 
to his schemes of univeral ascendency ; he succeeded in persuading the 
excitable people over whom he ruled that it was to England alone that 
they must look as the obstacle to the prosperity and glory of France. To 
afford vent to this national animosity, orders were immediately issued, 
accompanied by every circumstance of parade, for re-assembling the 
naval and military armaments at Boulogne, with the pompous title of 
"The Army of England," and with every demonstration of an early 
attempt at the invasion of our shores. The people of England stood 
forward to meet the threatened danger. In an incredibly short space of 
time 39,000 volunteer cavalry, 7,000 artillery, and 355,000 infantry were 
disciplined in defence of their King and country. In the course of this 
year were also assembled in arms 200,000 regular troops and militia. 

The state of preparation throughout Great Britain and the formidable 
attitude she had assumed, both at sea and on shore, to meet the hostile 
demonstration on the opposite coast was no doubt the principal cause by 
which the Ruler of France was deterred from carrying his threats into 
execution, and it was perhaps amongst the severest of the mortifications 
to which that extraordinary man had been exposed at the hands of 
England to find that all his exertions and unprecedented preparations 
had, in their result, conferred upon her the most extensive and permanent 
benefit, by producing a spirit of patriotism and national unanimity through 
all ranks of her population to an extent which no other circumstances 
could have called forth. 



J 



1 20 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 803- 



1803. 

The peace of 1802 ipso facto terminated the engagement both of the 
Provisional Cavalry and of the Yeomanry, the latter having by this grown 
to a paper strength of 24,000 rank and file, of whom it was estimated 
16,000 could be reckoned on ; but Parliament, while abandoning the 
Provisional Cavalry, decided to retain a certain proportion of the Yeomanry, 
partly for police purposes, partly because no one believed the renewal 
of the war to be far distant A good percentage of the corps offered 
to continue their services, and an Act of Parliament (42 G. III., c 66) 
was passed to enable his Majesty to avail himself of their offers, and to 
give certain privileges to, and to make certain regulations for, their 
members. 

This nucleus was speedily augmented when the war broke out again 
in the following year. Napoleon's preparations at Boulogne were the most 
potent of recruiting agents, and a Parliamentary return, dated 9th 
December, 1803, shows that corps of Volunteer and Yeomanry Cavalry had 
been formed in England and Scotland containing no less than 624 troops, 
with a strength of 33,832 of all ranks; and there were also 10,277 in 
Ireland 

The Yeomanry were a body of men to the patriotic and zealous 
services of whom the country has been so often indebted for the preserva- 
tion of the rights and properties of the subject on occasions when the 
overthrowing of law and order in one disturbed district might have led to 
the most dangerous results to the whole State. 

There could not have been a more varied organization than that of 
the British Yeomanry Corps. Some regiments were on a footing of 
discipline hardly susceptible of improvement. Others were in circumstances 
of great difficulty as to interior arrangement, and the utmost exertion and 
activity on the part of their officers was necessary for years before they 
could be brought to the perfection attained by other corps. Several 
regiments of Yeomanry could number as many as six, eight, and even ten 
troops, a body so numerous as hardly to be within the management of a 
regimental staff of the usual establishment, and these, too, dispersed over a 
great extent of country, and seldom assembled regimentally for exercise. 
Their means of obtaining instruction was also very limited, for the troop- 
majors, although generally an excellent, zealous, and intelligent class of 
men, yet from want of practice must necessarily lose some of their know- 
ledge of field duty. 

Besides the r^ments there were at first a great number of indepen- 
dent troops of Yeomanry in various parts of the country, the individuals 
of which, from having fewer opportunities of comparison, and consequently 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 803. 121 



less spirit of rivalry than existed among the regiments, were in many cases 
far less advanced in acquaintance with their field duty than their comrades. 
The degree of proficiency was quite as varied in the officers and men in 
general as in the different corps. 

There were to be found in the ranks of the Yeomanry many 
officers and non-commissioned ofiicers who, from former service in the 
regular cavalry, were perfectly competent in all points of regimental 
duty and command. Another description of officer in the Yeomanry 
consisted of gentlemen, who, from a natural military taste, or from a 
laudable desire to perform well whatever they take in hand, and to 
qualify themselves for the command which their position in their neigh- 
bourhood leads them to assume in these corps, made themselves nearly 
or quite as much masters of their business as if they had gone through 
the whole gradation of instruction in a regiment of the line. But on 
the other hand there were many Yeomanry officers who, from necessary 
avocations and totally different pursuits, were unable to follow up their 
detail of duty, although anxious to promote the advantage of their 
corps, and proud to appear in the ranks of such respectable unions. 
And it must not be forgotten that, however efficient and active their 
officers may have been, the very short periods allotted for the trainings 
of Yeomanry would not admit of much of that practical instruction by 
which the cavalry recruit is usually formed. 

Previous to this date the Yeomanry had been raised in the first 
instance by troops, the ** Gentlemen and Yeomen," reinforced by "respect- 
able persons*' and "substantial inhabitants" of a district, combining to 
offer their services with those of their horses. The normal strength was 
fifty to sixty, but it differed considerably; and the conditions on which 
the men enlisted varied as much as the strength of the troops. There 
was an ascending scale from *'the county," the "military district," "any 
part of England," to "Great Britain in case of invasion." 

These refinements, however, were swept away by the Secretary of 
State in 1803, who announced plainly that in case of invasion limitation 
of service would not be allowed to interfere with the exercise of his 
Majesty's ancient and undoubted prerogative of requiring the military 
service of his subjects. But as doubts had arisen as to men's right to 
quit the Yeomanry, the Act of 1804 ^^^^ down, in section 30, that a 
yeoman might leave at any time, if not actually on duty, by giving a 
fortnight's notice. It may be noted that aid to the civil power was 
always included in the duties undertaken, and in coastwise counties the 
protection of wreck was sometimes added as welL 

On the 28th of September, 1803, some sort of sjrstem was initiated 



122 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 



for uniting the troops into regiments, by the War Office laying down 
the following regulations for troops, &c, which should be accepted 
subsequently, and by degrees the older corps were all assimilated to the 
same standard. 

A troop, it was declared, was to consist of from eighty to one 
hundred men, with a captain, lieutenant, cornet, and quarter-master, an 
additional lieutenant being allowed if the strength exceeded seventy. A 
squadron was to consist of two troops, a corps of three to four, and 
a regiment of not less than five or more than twelve. A corps was 
allowed a major, in addition to the troop officers; a raiment a lieu- 
tenant-colonel and a major, with, if it comprised eight or more troops, 
a second lieutenant-colonel in addition. The proportion of N.-CO.'s 
to privates was to be ten per cent., a sei^eant and a corporal for every 
twenty men. 

There are no adjutants in the earliest lists, but they begin to be shown in 
1796. They seem at first to have been Yeomanry officers. On the 23rd 
September, 1803, the War Office assented to the appointment of an adjuUnt 
for every corps of not less than three troops — ^pay as follows : In case the 
regiment was called out to meet riots or invasion. Cavalry rates (95. a day for a 
lieutenant) and nothing at other times, unless authorised by the Lord 
Lieutenant of the county, founded on the necessity of the case, when dr. a day 
and 2J. for a horse would be granted. The military qualification of such an 
adjutant were that he should have served at least five years as a commissioned 
officer in the R^ulars, embodied Militia, Fencibles, or East India Company's 
Service. 

Previous experience of Cavalry was not required, but even so the officers 
needed were not forthcoming. Accordingly, in January, 1804, the 6r. a day 
was granted in all cases, and the qualification of the adjutant was reduced to a 
recommendation from the Lord-Lieutenant, and four years* service in any of the 
branches enumerated as commissioned officer or sergeant-major. At the same 
time the minimum strength entitling a corps to an adjutant was increased to 
three hundred effective rank and file. 

For corps under three hundred, but consisting of not less than three troops 
of at least forty men apiece, a sergeant-major was sanctioned at the same time. 
His pay, whether mobilised or not, was y. 2d. a day, with gd, horse allowance ; 
his qualifications were three years' service in the Regulars as a N.-CO., and the 
appointment was vested in the officer commanding. 

Drill instructors apparently were found somehow ; among pensioners and 
invalided soldiers probably, and in numbers sufficient, in the absence of any 
controlling adjutants, to be a nuisance; for cap. 121 of 1803, section eight, 
recites that, " whereas great inconvenience has been found to arise to the 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. ^23 

Volunteer and Yeomanry service during war from there being no authority to 
enforce disciph'ne among the sergeants and others receiving constant pay, or to 
prevent their quitting their corps and enlisting in His Majesty's other forces 
without leave, such sergeants, &c., shall during the continuance of the war be 
subject to the Mutiny Laws." 

In the same year the commander of any Volunteer corps or company was 
allowed to engage any old soldier whom he thought fit to instruct his men in 
the use of arms, and to allow him 2s. 6d. a day out of the poor rate of the 
parish or parishes from which the company was raised. 

This was repealed the following year — perhaps it was found derogatory to 
discipline for householders in the ranks to be rated for the pay of their 
instructors— but the repealing Act repeated that adjutants or N.-CO'a 
receiving constant pay of their rank must be subject to the Mutiny Act, and 
that not merely for the continuance of the war, but at all times. 

Trumpeters receiving pay as such, whether from his Majesty's or 
otherwise, i.e. from regimental funds, and farriers are placed in the same 
category. 

A hundred years ago, as more recently, public enthusiasm and public 
subscriptions waned as time went on ; so ere long, £^ 3s. per effective man was 
allowed annually for clothing and appointments, which could be issued for 
three years at once if required ; and subsequently j^i20 per troop was granted 
further in lieu of pay of sergeants and trumpeters, and of every other charge 
heretofore borne by the Government. At the same time, it was notified that 
establishments were to be adhered to, and supernulneraries were only to be 
received if no charge of any kind were brought on the Exchequer thereby. 

This peace allowance was supplemented the following year by section 
thirty-six of the Act of 1804, which enacted that when the Yeomanry were 
called out by the Lords-Lieutenant, or on the making of any general signal of 
alarm, the Receiver-Greneral of Taxes was to pay the CO. of each troop £2 2s. 
per man, (it is not explained how the Receiver-General at a time of general 
confusion was to get the cash into the hands of the persons entitled to receive 
it), and also that whenever a corps should voluntarily assemble on appearance 
of invasion, or for improving themselves in military duty, the Treasury might 
pay the CO. not exceeding ji^i i^. a man, to be laid out in providing necessaries 
for such men as desire it 

After a period of some confusion, the burden of equipment was, in 1803, 
assumed by the Government Some corps in other counties refused any 
assistance from the authorities, and provided themselves with everything, 
including arms, at their own expense ; but arms were in fact very difficult to 
obtain, so great was the pressure on those who made them. Firelocks were 
obtained from Prussia for some Infantry Volunteer Corps, and were badly 



1 24 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 803, 



reported on. A few companies were only armed with pikes. Accordingly, 
afterwards, the Act of 1804 in section six, allows drills to count for efficiency, if 
a man's deficiency in arms or accoutrements is due to the failure of the 
Grovernment to furnish the same. 

Surgeons are authorised by a circular of 1803, and after the earliest days of 
the force are shown in the lists of officers, as also are chaplains. 

Veterinary surgeons had only been appointed to the Regulars since 1796. 
The Westminster Light Horse, a wealthy corps with London to choose from, 
had a veterinary surgeon in 1799, but I cannot discover any other in the 
Yeomanry lists of the period. The nominal roll of the Wilts for 1799, 
embracing 612 of all ranks, shows but a single farrier, and the Earl of Chester's 
Inspection Report of 1804 shows none; but that in some regiments, at any 
rate, they were engaged and given a retaining fee is shown by the Act of 1804. 
To shoeing-smiths as such I have found no reference, nor any to armourers, 
who were only put on the establishment of the Regulars in connection with the 
reforms of the Duke of York after 1796. There is no mention either of 
saddlers or other dismounted men, nor of transport, mobilisation, or 
mobilisation stores, nor even of mess-tins, havresacks, and water-bottles. 
In fact there do not seem to have been any schemes thought out for providing 
corps with transport and stores they would have required to take the field. 
Each captain in the Cheshire was warned in 1803 to have four days' provisions 
and forage ready ; and a troop in Shropshire received somewhat later sealed 
orders, which, when opened many years afterwards, were found to contain 
instructions for each man to bring with him to muster two days' forage and 
provisions : and these may be a sample of what was done generally. The 
Cantyre farmers who offered one thousand carts with drivers and two thousand 
horses for service if and when required were doubtless not unique in their 
patriotism ; and in Scotland, at any rate, the oi^anization by 1805 must have 
been pretty complete to justify Lord Moira's ofTer to cross the Border with two 
columns of ten thousand men each (no Regulars among them), equipped as a 
regular army fit for the field, on the third day after receiving orders. 

It seems likely, therefore, that by 1805 niost Yeomanry Corps would 
have been capable of making their way, accompanied by such provisions and 
forage as they required, to any part of the country where their services 
were required. And this would have been largely due to the fact that their 
officers were gentlemen of the district, who knew all about it and its 
resources. Of military training. Yeomanry officers could have had little or 
none, but in education they were equal, if not superior, to their fellows in 
the Regulars. It will be remembered that Gibbon was an officer in the 
Hants Militia, and that Cromwell and Lord Lynedoch were civilians till 
well over forty. They possessed the habit of command ; they were accustomed 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 125 

to field sports and outdoor life; they led men who knew them and whom 
they knew ; and they were of a class that has shown itself capable of doing 
a good deal if put in the way of doing it, with a hint as to the best method 
of beginning* 



Charles Loftus, in " My Life/' says : — 

^ While recalling reminiscences of the Norfolk Rangers, so much prized 
in their own county in those days, I cannot but remember a circumstance 
which I witnessed as a boy, but which will hardly be credited in these days. 
My mother, my aunt Charlotte, afterwards Duchess of Leeds, Lady Anne 
Hudson, and Lady Harriet, afterwards Lady de Blaquiere — the three latter 
called in London 'the Graces' of the time — and all four sisters, were all 
good horsewomen, were dressed in neat uniforms, consisting of dark green 
cloth habits, braided in black across the chest in the style of the Rifles^ 
white gauntlets, standing collars, with a neat black tie and small bow. On 
their heads they wore helmets of black polished leather, on the top of which 
was a slight fringe of bearskin, from the back of the neck to its point on 
the forehead, while the peak was edged with a narrow line of silver, the 
chin strap being a silver chain. It was really not only becoming, but very 
pretty, and produced an immense feeling of pride in the corps. Young men, 
on the occasion of the inspection in Raynham Park, when these ladies 
marched past at the head of the corps in twos before their old father, were 
so charmed by the spectacle, that those who had not entered the corps came 
forward now in such numbers, offering to serve, that the Marquis had more 
members than he required. My mother's helmet and jacket I had in my 
hand years after, when old Sally Fox, who had the key of the cupboard in 
the nursery in which they were kept, showed them to me when I came back 
from sea It was the sight of this corps of Rangers which inspired me with 
my first fancy to be in the cavalry, though I afterwards went to sea." 



The Norwich Light Horse had at this time attained to a considerable 
proficiency in all that relates to military training and discipline. This was, 
no doubt, greatly the effect of their incessant meetings during the past for 
duty or service ; but it was in a still greater degree owing to the indefatigable 
attention as well as the singular ability and judgment with which all the 
arrangements were directed by Major John Harvey. 

These eminent qualities were fully appreciated by every member of the 
corps, and a unanimous feeling prevailed amongst them that ' an opportunity 
should be taken to offer some public testimony of the value which they 



126 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 

entertained of his merits and services. With this view, his portrait, in the 
uniform of the Norwich Light Horse, was painted by Opie, and hung at the 
request of the troop in St Andrew's Hall, Norwich, on March 21st, 1803. 

This year brought fresh dangers ; Major-General Money, the officer 
commanding the district, published again an address pointing out the necessity 
of immediate steps being taken for defence in case of invasion. This had its 
effect on the public mind, and once again in the seaports and market-towns 
of the county of Norfolk volunteer corps were brought into existence. The 
total number of enrolments, it is stated, were 7,300 in the City of Norwich and 
the County ; this being six times the number of the old militia, and as will 
doubtless ever be the case, conscription proved unnecessary, and the com- 
pulsory clauses of the Defence Act were suspended. 

The various corps, both infantry and cavalry, volunteered to perform 
garrison duty at Yarmouth, and as will be subsequently seen, carried it 
out well. 

Of the actual doings of the different detachments, however, but little is 
recorded, except what can be gathered from old newspaper files ; doubtless 
there are hidden away in old lumber rooms in some of our county halls old 
letters and documents relating to this period which would now prove most 
interesting, but my researches in this direction have, I regret to say, proved 
fruitless ; most of the descendants of these Yeomanry to whom I have applied 
have invariably informed me that they have none in their possession. 

The Norfolk Chronicle of March 19th, 1803, states that "in consequence 
of the presenta spect of public affairs, a meeting of the late members of the 
Norwich Military Association was held at the Hall in St Andrew's on Tuesday 
last, which was numerously attended ; when it was unanimously resolved to 
offer their services to the Government through the medium of their former and 
highly respected commander, John Patteson, Esq. 

'' We also learn that Thomas H. Case, of Great Fransham, formerly a 
private in the East Dereham or second Troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, was 
charged before the Rev. Dixon Hoste with obstinately refusing to deliver up 
his arms, accoutrements and clothing, for which he was fined ;f 10. 

**The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers commanded by Captain John 
Harvey, (having completed their fortnights exercise) will parade in the Market 
Place, and afterwards dine together at the Rampant Horse Inn, this well 
appointed corps is now seventy strong." 

Norfolk Chronicle, July i6th, 1803. 

" NORFOLK. 

"At a general meeting of the Deputy Lieutenants and Magistrates 
of the county of Norfolk, held at the Shirehouse on Saturday the 9th 



Captain JOHN HARVEY, 

In the Uniform of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, 1803. 

He afterwards commanded ihe 3rd or East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, 

from 1823 to 1818. 

From thepicturi iti St. Andrau't Hall. Norwich. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 127 



day of July 1803, for the purpose of taking into consideration the most 
effectual measures that can be adopted for the defence of the said 
county, and the preservation of property, in the event of an actual 
invasion : — 

"Gentlemen present, as follows: — 

"The most Noble the Marquis Townshend in the chair. 

"The Right Honourable Lord Wodehouse, The Honourable William 
Assheton Harbord, Sir Edmund Bacon Bart, Sir Thomas Beevor Bart, 
Sir Roger Kerrison, Thomas Beevor Esqr, Thomas Allday Kerrison Esqr, 
Mark Hildesley Dickens Esqr, Theophilus Gurdon Esqr, Thomas Brown 
Evans Esqr, John Money Esqr, James Burkin Burrouglies Esqr, William 
Earle Bulwer Esqr, Randall Burroughes Esqr, Tom Cubitt Esqr, Thomas 
Kerrich Esqr, William Adair Esqr, Robert Adair Esqr, Robert Plumtre 
Esqr, Charles Laton Esqr, Edward Pratt Esqr, John Hyde Esqr, Thomas 
Blofield Esqr, George Cubitt Esqr, Robert Harvey Esqr, Robert Harvey 
Esqr (the younger), John Harvey Esqr, William Mason Esqr, (the younger) 
Hammond Alpe Esqr, James Crowe Esqr, Charles Harvey Esqr, Thomas 
Blake Esqr, Thomas Hammond Cooper Esqr, John Gay Esqr, Rev. Coleby 
Bullock, Rev. John Gooch, Rev. George Preston, Rev. Edward Mellish, 
Rev. John Oldershaw, Rev. John Humphrey, Deputy Lieutenants and 
Magistrates of the county. 

"Also, General Sir James Craig. KB., General Milner commanding 
the East District, B. Morse Esqr deputy commissary general of Eastern 
District, and Edward Harvey Grigson Esqr central commissary. 

•* Resolved — That the Lord Lieutenant of the county, be requested to 
disgest a plan for the approbation of the General officer commanding the 
District, pointing out the most eligible routes for conducting the moveable 
property of the county, under the protection of the Yeomanry Cavalry, to 
secure depots in the event of invasion. 



Norfolk Chronicle, July, 1803. 

"July 24th, — The Norfolk Rangers (Yeomanry Cavalry) had a 
field day at Rainham Park, and subscribed £\QO towards the fund 
instituted by the merchants of London for the relief of persons who 
may suffer in the general defence of the country. 

"We also learn that the male part of the Norwich Company 
(theatrical) have agreed to enroll themselves to learn the use of arms. 

"This month also. Captain John Harvey was promoted to be 
major of the squadron of the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers." 



128 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 



It is evident that none of the coips were at this period inactive; as 
the papers are full of their orders for drills. 
Charles Loftus, in ''My Life," says: — 

''I may here mention an anecdote regarding Sergeant Bond of the 
Norfolk Rangers. When a little boy of seven years old, I was sent with 
my brothers from Raynham to see the Rangers on Hempton Green, at 
exercise. Among the members of the Rangers was a Mr. Matthew Pepper 
Manby, the second name well adapted to him, for he was a very peppery 
but good and kind hearted person. The Marquis was very fond of him, 
and when a boy he had been very often at the Hall, with his brother the 
Admiral, and Captain Manby, who was subsequently the inventor of 
the well-known apparatus for saving life in shipwreck, by means of firing a 
rope, attached to a shot or rocket, over a stranded vessel, a plan which 
has been the means, to my knowledge, of saving the lives of many good 
seamen on the Norfolk coast, and elsewhere: Mr. Manby had always had 
a wish to hold a farm on the Raynham estate, and when he became old 
enough to do so, Lord Townshend gave him that of South Raynham, 
called Raynham St Martins. 

'' Well, the corps had finished their exercise, had been dismissed on the 
Green, and the standard had been committed to the custody of an escort 
of those members who lived at the three Raynhams, to be taken to the 
Hall. Sergeant Bond, who resided at Helhoughton, had generally the com- 
mand of this escort, and on his way he overtook Mr. Manby riding quietly 
home. The sergeant, coming up with his men to the said gentleman, who 
was in his uniform, called out, 

« ' Fall in, Mr Manby, with the escort' 

''Manby, looking round instantly, replied, 

" ' ril see you d d first I ' 

"'Will you sir? I tell you again, sir, to fall in I' 

" Manby being in one of his peppery fits, started off at a trot 

" The sergeant set spurs to his horse, headed the peppery cavalier, and 
with his drawn sword at his breast, arrested his progress. 

"The pepper became sharper, and drawing his sabre, Manby crossed 
that of the sergeant, who making a number one cut, brought his weapon 
down on the helmet of Manby with such force that he not only cut it 
through, but brought the wearer to the ground. Fortunately the helmet 
saved his skull, but the fall did not subdue his temper. Rising from the 
ground, all soiled, he broke out into a violent passion, swearing vengeance 
against old Bond, who cooly said, 

"'Sheath your sword, and mount your steed immediatly, sir.' 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. ^^9 



" Manby, finding that he had a tough customer with whom to deal, and 
one from whom he was likely to receive no quarter, at last thought 'dis- 
cretion was the better part of valour/ and did as he was commanded — ^fell 
in with the escort, with a fallen countenance, and rode quietly up to the 
Hall with the standard. 

" Bond, having formed his men in line there, fronting the windows, gave 
the word, ' Return swords ! To your quarters, break I ' and dismissed the 
men to partake of a black jack of fine old ale, prepared for them on these 
occasions. Manby, meanwhile, requested an interview with the Marquis, 
who was at home in the library. He was shewn upstairs, through the 
marble hall, to the presence of his colonel, with his damaged helmet in his 
hand, himself covered with dust. On entering, having saluted his officcTi 
he said, 

"'My lord, is this the way in which your lordship will allow your 
troop to be served?' showing his helmet. 

''The Marquis inquired how it had all happened, and expressing his 
regret at it, instantly sent for the sergeant, who made his appearance, 
quite expecting that he should be summoned. He told his story, and 
the refusal of private Manby to ' fall in.' The Marquis, turning to the latter, 
said, 

'*'I fear, Mr. Manby, you are a better farmer than a soldier 1 It is 
very fortunate it is no worse. It might have been your head but it is 
only your helmet Sergeant Bond did his duty, when you disobeyed 
orders.' 

" He rang the bell, ordered wine for Manby, and dismissed the sergeant, 
with a caution not to be so hasty with the use of his sabre, but to report 
any act of disobedience in future. 

*' Manby looked glum for a few moments, and then recovered his 
usual manner. The sergeant was recalled, the butler filled glasses of wine, 
which they drank together, and shook hands, and no more was said of the 
matter." 



So serious was the apprehension of an invasion, that the Government 
considered it advisable to call in the assistance of the Yeomanry to protect 
the town of Yarmouth and neighbourhood, as that seemed to be one of 
the most vulnerable points at which an enemy might make a descent We 
therefore learn that on October 15th, at a parade of the Norwich Volunteers, 
a letter was read from the Lord-Lieutenant asking if they would undertake 
to perform permanent duty at Yarmouth. A unanimous reply was given 
in the affirmative, and we are told that " the officers and gentlemen of the 

I 



1 30 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 803, 



Light Horse Volunteers laid their hands on their breasts, as an appeal to 
their honour to undertake the duty whenever they should be required/' 
Shortly afterwards the commanding officers received instructions to have 
their corps in a perfect state of military equipment, and be prepared to 
march at a moment's notice. 

The first corps which was called on to march to Yarmouth was the 
two troops of the Norfolk Rangers. They entered Norwich on their way 
to Yarmouth, on November 8th. They were headed by the Marquis 
Townshend and commanded by Captain Sir M. B. flfolkes, Bart, and 
Captain Beauchamp. There were seven officers, two quarter- masters, seven 
sergeants, two trumpeters, and ninety-four privates. The officers dined in 
the evening with Sir Roger Kerrison, and on the following morning the 
squadron resumed its march. 

According to a Parliamentary return, ordered to be printed on 20th 
February, 1804, the following corps of Yeomanry in Norfolk performed 
permanent duty at Yarmouth at this period 

They took it in turns, and relieved one another for periods of about 
seven days at a time. Their services terminated in January, 1804, when 
the crisis of an invasion seemed to have passed away. 

The following are the other corps of Yeomanry which performed 
permanent duty at Yarmouth: — 

Loddon, Captain Smyth, 53 
Blofield, Captain Burroughes, 58 
Tunstead and Happing, Captain Laton, 67 
Yarmouth, Captain E. K. Lacon, 55 
Norwich Light Horse, Major Harvey, 90 
Lynn and Freebridge, Major Taylor, 100 
South Erpingham, Major Bulwer, 43 
Dereham, Captain Crisp, 44 
Swaflfham, Captain Johnson, 40 
East Dereham, Captain Hyde, 60 
Hingham, Captain Alpe, 60 
Wymondham, Hon. W. Wodehouse, 60 

There were, it is stated, 2,500 men then on duty in the town of 
Yarmouth, but I shall have more to say about some of the corps during 
their term of duty, as the papers of the day are full of accounts of their 
arrivals and departures. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 803. 1 3 1 

Norfolk Chronicle^ October 22nd, 1803. 

''SHAM FIGHT ON BRAMERTON COMMON. 

''In consequence of orders from General Milner, to the commanding 
officers of Artillery, Militia, and Yeomanry and Volunteer Regiments in 
this city and neighbourhood to perform a sham fight on Bramerton Common 
on Tuesday morning last; four field pieces, and two howitzers under the 
command of Captain Fyars, five companies of the Shropshire Militia, 
commanded by Major Sky, (the grenadier company of which acted as 
light infantry), the Loyal Norwich Volunteers, Colonel Patteson ; about 
200 men of the the city of Norwich volunteer regiment under Colonel 
R. Harvey, Major John Harveys squadron of Norwich Light Horse volunteers, 
the Loddon troop. Captain Smyth, and the Blofield troop. Captain Burroughes, 
proceeded to the appointed place about ten o'clock. Colonel Patteson's 
regiment, and the Loddon and Blofield troops with two field pieces, acted 
as the French, the Militia and the other corps as English. The action 
soon after commenced by a skirmish between the English and French 
horse patrols, when the latter after a few pistol shots, fell back on a field 
piece, stationed at the entrance of the road. This on the approach of the 
English column fired a shot and retreated. The English then advanced 
with their skirmishers, and two field pieces in their front They found the 
enemy in a strong position at the extremity of the heath ; on which the 
Light Infantry extended themselves in front of the column, keeping up a 
continued fire, in advancing, till they arrived within about two hundred 
yards of the French line, when they closed in upon the main body, which 
immediately deployed into line; the enemy at the same time opening upon 
them his whole fire of musketry and field pieces. The English line now 
advanced, and at a distance of about 100 yards commenced firing, which 
continually became mutually supported ; both lines advancing on each 
other. 

" After firing a few rounds by divisions and files, the English retired by 
wings under the cover of their Light Infantry fire ; the French line at the 
same time advancing upon them, till arrived at a certain distance, when a 
very severe and well supported fire was opened upon them by a body of 
200 men, (part of Colonel Harvey's men) and two howitzers, posted in an 
ambuscade on their left flank. This independent firing was kept up with 
such effect as to oblige the enemy to retreat, who when arrived at a 
certain distance, formed two columns, leaving an interval for the Light 
Horse to advance, and cover their retreat. An attack then commenced 
between the cavalry and the respective bodies, which ended in the retreat 



132 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803 



of the French squadrons. A flag of truce was then hoisted on the part 
of the French, and the action finished. The several corps, both cavalry 
and infantry, formed afterwards one line, and passed the General in open 
columns of divisions in review order. The several regiments and troops 
were then marched back to the places where they had assembled in the 
morning, and were dismissed. 

*^ All the Norwich Volunteers were treated with porter, and the Officers 
and Gentlemen of the Loddon troop were dismissed after being handsomely 
regaled by Captain Smyth, with cold beef and porter, at Framingham 
Gull. The Commandants and Field-officers afterwards dined with General 
Milner at his house in Magdalen Street 

" After the operations of the day, (which were performed before a great 
concourse of spectators) the following orders were issued from head- 
quarters. 

"Oct 1 8th 1803. 

"Major General Milner desires the commanding officers of Yeomanry 
and Volunteer corps, to express to the officers and men under their 
command, the great pleasure he received in witnessing their soldier-like 
and steady behaviour in the field this morning, and is convinced they will 
show the same upon more trying occasions. 

"THOS WILLIAM GORDON. 

"Capt A.D.C." 



Norfolk Chronicle, October 22nd, 1803. 

" On Tuesday last the day of review and inspection on Bramerton 
Common, the two troops of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, under the 
command of Major J. Harvey, previous to their entering the ground, 
were formed into a hollow square, and addressed by the Major, as to the 
expectation of their being called out by the Government The Major read 
a letter from the Marquis Townshend the X^ord Lieutenant, inquiring whether 
the corps would volunteer their services on permanent duty at Yarmouth. 
In putting the question, he said he felt it his duty as their commanding 
officer, to declare his own sentiments, and pledged himself upon his honour 
to march with his comrades wherever the Government should demand their 
services. The officers and gentlemen of the corps laid their hands upon 
their breasts, as an appeal to their honour, to undertake that duty when- 
ever it should be required. The dinner of the corps on Friday the 14th 
was honoured with the presence of Generals Milner and Money. ' Colonels 
Maxwell, (Dragoon Guards), Patteson and R. Harvey. Captains Fyars 
(Royal Artillery), Minto (Royal Marines), and many officers of the volunteer 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 133 



corps. One hundred gentlemen sat down to dinner, and according to the 
custom of the corps, passed the afternoon with the most perfect unanimity 
and convivialty." 

Norfolk Chronicle, November 12th, 1803. 

" On Saturday last the Commanding Officer of the Norfolk Rangers 
(Yeomanry Cavalry), the Norwich Volunteers, and the Fakenham Volunteers 
received orders from Lieut General Sir James Craig KB. and commander in 
chief of the Eastern District, (communicated through Major General Milner) 
for the above corps to march to Yarmouth on the following Tuesday. 

"Tuesday afternoon, about four oclock, the most noble Marquis 
Townshend our venerable and highly respected Lord Lieutenant, entered 
this city, at the head of the Norfolk Rangers, on their way to Yarmouth. 
The two troops, (to each of which twelve dismounted cavalry armed with 
rifles carbines are attached), were commanded by Captain Beauchamp, and 
Sir M. B. Folkes Bart. They are a fine body of men and mounted on very 
capital chargers, their uniform is green. The corps of Gentlemen and 
Yeomanry cavalry is the first in the Kingdom as to the date of its 
establishment (1782), and was the first appointed to, and the first to under- 
take garrison duty. The following is the correct return of the number of 
ofRcers and men, that marched in, 7 officers, 2 quarter-masters, 7 sergeants, 
2 trumpeters, and 94 privates. After the troops had dismounted, and had 
retired to their respective quarters, the Marquis Townshend, General Loftus, 
General Milner, and several other officers, dined with Sir Roger Kerrison. 
The next morning the squad proceeded for Yarmouth. 

"The commanding officers of the Yeomanry and Infantry in the city 
and county have received a letter from the Lord Lieutenant signifying that 
his Majesty is highly gratified by the zeal and alacrity manifested by the 
several corps which have volunteered their services to do garrison duty at 
Yarmouth; and as the designs of the enemy to invade this country are 
becoming more apparent, his Majesty has been pleased to direct that these 
corps do keep themselves in readiness to march upon that service in the 
rotation appointed by the General of the district, and that during such time 
as they shall be voluntarily assembled, all the officers, non-commissioned 
officers, trumpeters, drummers, and privates shall be entitled to receive 
regular pay from the 8th instant, and during the time of their being con- 
tinued in such service, and so receiving pay, be subject to military discipline, 
and placed under the command of the General of the District, and shall 
conform to the rules and regulations of his Majestys military service." 



134 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 



In the Norfolk Chronicle of November 12th, 1803, it states that the 
Tunstead and Happing troop, commanded by Captain Laton, was inspected 
by Lieut-Colonel Metzner at Wroxham. The system, discipline, and every 
appointment was such that the Inspecting Field-OfHcer declared he had 
not a fault to find and should report accordingly. 

At Yarmouth, it is evident that the troops there were not permitted 
to be idle, as we read that the Norfolk Rangers, the Shropshire Militia, 
and the Norwich Volunteers had a grand field day on the Denes, on the 
19th of November; when "they went through their manoeuvres, firings, and 
charges, with a correctness, precision and spirit, that would not have 
reflected discredit on veteran troops. Should the weather prove favourable, 
there is to be a sham-fight with a debarkation of troops from Sir Sidney 
Smith's boats on Monday." 



Norfolk Chronicle, November 19th, 1803. 

'^The Norfolk Rangers having done duty for one week, left Yarmouth 
on Wednesday morning last 

'' Parties each night patrolled the beach, from the South Fort to Caister, 
and were relieved every three hours. The Rangers Song which is given upon 
all occasions when the corps meet, was sung at Head-quarters before 
General Milner. 

" In ^he evening the troops arrived at Yarmouth, and as it may be 
imagined, with all the animation that the time and occasion could inspire. 

"The Rangers arrived in Norwich the same afternoon, and the next 
morning proceeded for their respective homes. This ended the garrison 
duty at Yarmouth. 

" Last Wednesday night the South Erpingham and Eynsford troop of 
Yeomanry Cavalry, with the Heydon Sharp-shooters, or light armed infantry, 
commanded by Colonel Bulwer, were inspected in Heydon Park by Lieut 
Colonel Metzner, who was highly satisfied with the military appearance of 
the cavalry, and expressed great astonishment at seeing the newly raised 
corps of infantry (that had never but once before met), march and form with 
such precision." 

On November 26th, the Norfolk Chronicle relates "an express arrived 
from Lowestoft, to the Admiral stationed at Yarmouth, advising him of two 
vessels having been seen off Southwold, which did not answer the proper 
signals. This intelligence was soon exagerated, and a report was spread 
throughout the town, that six sail of the line, and many gun boats, (of 
the enemy) were off Lowestoft On hearing which the Gentlemen belonging 
to the Blofield and Loddon Cavalry, immediately assembled, gave three 






714^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. ^35 



cheers, and went directly for the beach, which with an alacrity and per* 
severance, that would have done credit to veterans, they patrolled all night, 
and notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, (for it was a bitter 
night), there was no shrinking from duty." 



Norfolk Chronicle^ December 3rd, 1803. 

" Yarmouth. 

" Yesterday in consequence of the orders received from General Milner^ 
the Tunstead and Happing troop of Yeomanry cavalry, Captain Laton ; the 
Yarmouth ditto Capt. Lacon, the Shropshire Militia, and the Norwich 
regiment of volunteers, Lieut-Colonel Harvey, assembled about 9 oclock 
in the Market Place, and proceeded from thence in open column of sub- 
divisions to the Denes, where the Militia and the Volunteers having formed 
line, with the Tunstead troop on their right, and the Yarmouth on their 
left; the cavalry advanced and an engagement with a supposed enemy, 
who had landed near the Haven's mouth, was commenced by the 
skirmishers of the cavalry, who after firing their pistols fell back in their 
respective troops, under the protection of which the whole line of infantry 
advanced. After the two troops had performed some evolutions and fired, 
they retreated by wings, and formed in the flanks of the infantry, who 
first fired three rounds from flanks to centre, and then (taking the word 
of command from the General) the whole line fired an excellent volley 
to the front, posted arms, and charged bayonets, the trumpets sounding, 
the drums beating, and the bands of the Militia and Volunteers playing 
the charge, which was made in good line and order. The Militia and 
Volunteers were then halted by the General ; the cavalry advanced from 
the flanks of the infantry, and after firing their pistols made a spirited 
charge. 

"The supposed enemy having also eflected a landing on the beach, 
the infantry were then formed into open column of grand divisions, and 
whilst the centre and front grand divisions were retreating, the rear grand 
division kept up a brisk fire from right to left, fired a volley, and charged 
with bayonets. This division then retired under cover of the cavalry, and 
formed line on the other divisions, which had retreated to a considerable 
distance. During this action, the troops were considerably annoyed by a 
violent storm of hail. 

"The Militia then entered upon a new alignment (by the echelon 
movement) fronting the sea, and the Norwich volunteers were stationed 
under the sand hills by detached companies ; the latter soon after 
commenced an independant firing upon the supposed enemy on the beach ; 



136 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 



this continued for some time, when they retired, and formed h'ne on the 
left of the Shropshire, the whole then fired a volley to the front; the 
cavalry advanced and scoured the beach, going through the sword exercise 
with great precision and spirit. 

" The Yeomanry cavalry. Militia, and Volunteers, then returned to the 
Market Place, where they were dismissed. The Mayor of Yarmouth, 
General Milner and his aide-de-camp. Captain Gordon, afterwards dined 
with Lieut-Colonel Harvey and the officers of the Norwich Regiment of 
Volunteers at the Wrestlers Inn." 



Norfolk Chronicle^ December loth, 1803. 

*• Yarmouth. 

" Tomorrow, the squadron of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, Major 
John Harvey, marched from hence. During their stay here one week, 
they mounted a picquet of one subaltern, two sergeants, two corporals, 
and 24 privates, and patrolled the beach during the night, from the South 
Battery to Caister. It is a circumstance highly creditable to the corps, 
that out of two troops of which it consists, only five were absent on the 
day of duty on which they marched in here ; of this number, four were 
unable to attend from indisposition, and one was in London, but he joined 
the next day," 

The above paper also relates that when the Lynn and Freebridge 
Yeomanry marched for Yarmouth they were accompanied by a rifle corps 
of about fifty men, and a four-pounder field piece, to which twelve 
artillery-men armed with pikes were attached. The whole corps was under 
the command of Major Taylor. 

There were now twenty-two troops of Yeomanry Cavalry in the county 
of Norfolk, and with a better organization and knowledge of their duties, 
improved methods of discipline came into operation, which I shall have 
occasion to mention later on. 

The following announcement appears in the Norfolk Chronicle of 
December 24th, 1803 : — 

"The several troops of Gentlemen and Yeomanry in this county, 
having been formed into three regiments, his Majesty has been pleased to 
appoint the most noble Marquis Townshend to be colonel of the West 
regiment, Major-General Money to be colonel of the Eastern regiment, and 
Colonel Bulwer to be Lieut-colonel commandant of the Midland regiment" 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. ^11 



The Norfolk Chronicle of December 24th states : — ^" Doubts having been 
entertained and insinuations thrown out with no good intentions, respecting 
the power of officers commanding regiments and battalions of volunteers, 
and to do away the mischief and jealousies such doubts may create, 
General Money has written an address to the officers and privates of the 
East Norfolk regiment of volunteer cavalry, of which he is colonel, the 
following paragraph, which is an extract: — 

*' ' Far be it from using any other words in prefacing any communications 
I may have to make to officers commanding corps, than request and 
recommend R.O. (or Regimental orders) : you will never see till then the 
indispensable necessity of issuing them, when the enemy are off the coast, 
or a landing effected.'" 

The same newspaper also states, "when the Dereham troop arrived at 
Dereham from their duty at Yarmouth, it was welcomed by a great 
concourse of the inhabitants. The church bells were rung, and the officers 
and many members of the troop dined together in the evening at the 
Kings Arms Inn." 

In 1802 five days' attendance in the year at muster and exercise 
gave Yeomen exemption from Militia service ; but this was raised in 
1803 to twelve days. In addition to these drills, corps might and did 
assemble under their own officers at some convenient place within their 
county for the purpose of being trained and exercised for a period not 
exceeding fourteen days. For permanent duty of this character applica- 
tion had to be made through the Lord- Lieutenant to the Secretary of 
State. The other drills were held at the rate of four at least every four 
months, and appear to have been of the character of squad and troop 
drills, and seem, in fact, to have taken place for the convenience of the 
men at frequent intervals. 

Two or three regimental drill books have survived, and some treatises 
on the handling, &c., of their corps drawn up by soldiers for the benefit of 
amateur commanding officers. There was no regulation drill book for the 
Regular Cavalry till after the Duke of York became Commander-in-Chief 
in 1795. Each commanding officer did what was right in his own eyes, 
and the Yeomanry, when first raised at any rate, did the same. 

There is one drill book still extant for the Norfolk Yeomanry; it is 
for the instruction of the East Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry for 
the year 1825, which was at that time commanded by Lieut-Col. John 
Harvey. 

These drill books show considerable variety in detail ; for instance, the 
Bucks Yeomanry took four inches interval from knee to knee, told off by 



138 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry 0/ Norfolk, 1803. 



threes, and returned swords in four motions; whilst in "an address to 
Yeomanry by a field officer of cavalry who has served all this war on the 
Continent/' 1795, the interval recommended is *'a foot to spare between 
files." The telling oflf is by fours, and the metliod of drawing the sword is 
roundly declared to be of no consequence, as every man will manage to do 
that without instruction. 

This field officer was a practical man, advising the men to ride with 
their feet home and with short stirrups, and warning that there should 
always be advanced guards thrown out, and flanking patrols. The tone of 
his little book is in marked contrast to that underlying such manoeuvres 
as the " Skirmishing Advance " of the Bucks Yeomanry : '' Rear rank draw 
swords. Front rank draw pistols, gallop thirty paces and fire. The rear 
rank then gallop up, and pass the line of the front rank, playing the broad 
sword exercise. At thirty yards halt, sling swords, draw pistols, and fire." 
The front rank having meanwhile loaded, "draw swords, gallop thirty 
yards past the rear rank, playing as before, then halt and fire/' and so on. 
Other movements laid down are deployment from column of half squadrons 
on a central half squadron, and changing front on the centre of a squadron. 
Movements generally seem to have been executed from and to the halt, 
and to have been complicated and encumbered throughout by the assumed 
necessity of always keeping the squadrons in the same order from right to 
left in line and from front to rear in column. 

There were no instructions for outpost or convoy work, though the 
Bucks drill book speaks of the feeding of one army and the starving of 
another as the special business of the force ; but then in the campaign of 
1793 our Light Dragoons had to be taught these elementary duties by the 
Prussian Hussars, and they were reckoned rather beneath the dignity of 
troops of the line. There was no regulation sword exercise in the Cavalry 
till 1796, and in this also the motto was probably '*Go as you please/' 

It will be noticed, however, in the resolutions adopted by the Norwich 
Light Horse in 1797 that the gentlemen would be instructed in the Hungarian 
sword exercise. 

As to pistol practice, I find a recommendation that even when firing 
with blank they should be aimed at something, and not discharged in the 
air ; and an official intimation to the Irish Yeomanry in 1798 that gun- 
powder for practice can on no account be allowed, lest it should be sold 
to the rebels. 

Whatever may have been, however, the vagaries and varieties in the 
early days of the Yeomanry force, there seems evidence that by 1 804-5, ^^ 
any rate, uniformity sufficient for practical purposes was being insisted on, 
for in 1803 the officers commanding military districts were instructed to 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 139 



furnish plans of instruction for drill and exercise recommended for general 
adoption, and in September of that year twenty-one Field Officers on half- 
pay were selected, given the brevet rank of Lieut-Colonel, and appointed 
Inspectors of Yeomanry and Volunteers, with orders to muster and report 
on every corps within two months, and to see that every exertion was 
made to promote efficiency. 

This was followed by the Act of 1804, which in section 46 provides for 
training either separately, or in brigade, and with regulars ; and it is on record 
that the Shrewsbury Corps had a field day with two troops of the 3rd King's 
Dragoons in 1800, and that the Wilts, Dorset, and South Hants went through 
a brigade field day in 1805 under an officer of the Regular Cavalry as 
Brigadier, to the satisfaction of Lieut-General H.R.H. the Duke of 
Cumberland, who inspected them. 

But though we have records of reviews such as these, and reports of 
Inspecting Officers as to drill and equipment, there is little to show whether 
the officers had their men in hand, and if the tone and conduct of the latter 
were satisfactory. 

It would appear from the returns that absence without leave was 
sadly common, which is not suggestive of strict discipline ; but considering 
the peculiar character of the force, this might have been, and probably was, 
quite compatible with general good behaviour. Unless that was the rule 
in the Yeomanry of 1805, the position of the officers would have been 
difficult, for if I read sections 23 and 46 of the Act of 1804 correctly, 
Yeomen, unless assembled to resist invasion, or in aid of the civil power, 
were only under military law when qualifying for efficiency at "muster and 
exercise." They were not, however, in any case to be brought before a 
court-martial not wholly composed of Yeomanry or Volunteer officers, and 
they were expressly exempt from military law when assembled under 
section 46 for '^ training." 

It is true that men who misconducted themselves under arms at any 
time, or on their way to any place of assembly, or when wearing uniform, 
might be ordered into the custody of any person or persons of their corps ; 
but with no confinement in a guard room ; but when privates were the 
equals and superiors of N.-C.O.'s off parade, one may doubt if this was 
much use. Fines, however, might be imposed under regimental rules 
approved by the Secretary of State, pay might be stopped, and the day's 
attendance disallowed for misconduct under arms ; and at any time when 
the corps was not on actual service the commanding officer might discharge 
any man for any reason he thought sufficient 

The Wilts history mentions the case of a sergeant who in 1804 was 
tried and reduced for disobedience to orders (it may be only a coinci- 



140 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 803. 



dence, but the President of the Court resigned his commission shortly 
afterwards, which looks as if he had got himself disliked). As no other 
court-martial is mentioned in any regimental records that I have seen, 
it is likely that this was an isolated case, and that, as might be 
expected among men of good social position, fines and discharges usually 
sufficed for the maintenance of sufficient discipline. The scale of fines 
adopted in the Earl of Chester's Yeomanry in 1804 is preserved. They 
were : — 









Officers. 


Men. 


For not being present at roll call ... 






\s. 


6d. 


„ being half an hour late 






zr. 6</. 


IX. 


„ absence £rom drill 






5J. 


2s. 6d, 


„ talking at drill 








td. 


„ being drunk on parade 






lor. td. 


5^. 


„ dirty nniform 






IS. 


ij. 



It is noticeable and eloquent of the standard of the times that such 
an offence in an officer as being drunk on parade was thought sufficiently 
punished by a fine, and relatively by a very light one; but no one 
thought the worse of a M.P. then if he appeared in the House of 
Commons the worse for liquor. The power of summary discharge vested 
in commanding officers was a somewhat potent weapon, as men thus got 
rid of lost their exemption from the taxes on horses and hair powder, 
and became liable to serve in the Militia. 



Resolutions 

OF THE 

Light Horse Volunteers, 

with a few 

Gen er al I n structions 

AND 

Explanation of Terms 
for the use of the squadron. 

Norwich : 

Printed by Stevenson, Matchett and Stevenson. 

and in the collection of the Norwich Free Library. 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 141 



Resolutions 

OF THE 

Norwich 
Light Horse Volunteers, 

February, 1797: June 5th, 1803. 

1st, Resolved, 

That the present Crisis most urgently requiring the Continuance of 
that Exertion of Loyalty and Public Spirit which established the Corps 
of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, in February, 1797, they now solemnly 
pledge themselves to be ready to march to any part of Great Britain, 
whenever Grovemment may demand their Services. 

2d. Resolved, 

The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers having been approved by his 
Majesty, that a copy of these Resolutions, with the Name and Residence 
of each Member of the Squadron, be presented to the Mayor of Norwich, 
and to any of the Magistrates of the County of Norfolk, authorising them 
to demand the Assistance of the Light Horse Volunteers whenever in 
their Opinion, their Services may be required. 

3d. Resolved, 

That it be recommended to each Gentleman in the Squadron to be 
instructed in the Exercise of the Hungarian Broad Sword, and to have 
his horse properly trained. Serjeants are expected to render themselves 
perfect in the Exercise, and enable themselves to instruct their respective 
Squads. 

4th. Resolved, 

That on any Question, a Majority of Two-thirds of the Squadron be 
binding upon the whole. 

Sth. Resolved, 

That silence be observed in the Ranks during Exercise, otherwise no 
one can learn or understand his Duty ; a Deviation in this Article to be 
subject to the Forfeiture of One Shilling, and that the Quaner-Master be 
ordered to attend to this Particular. 

6th. Resolved, 

That Gentlemen absent on a Field-day be fined Five Shillings, or not 
appearing till the Squadron is told off, Two Shillings and Sixpence, to 
be paid to the Quarter-Master. 



142 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 

7th. Resolved, 

That after three successive Absences from Duty, without previously 
assigning to the Commanding Officer a satisfactory Reason, such Person 
shall be dismissed, unless otherwise directed by the sense of a General 
Meeting. 

8th. Resolved, 

That any Gentleman absent on Review-days, the King's Birthday, or 
special Orders of Attendance, shall pay a fine of Half a Guinea. 

9th. Resolved, 

That any Gentleman detected in the shameful practice of making use 
of their Military Clothing or Accoutrements, on any occasion except on 
Duty, will be liable to a fine of Half a Guinea. 

loth. Resolved, 

That any Gentleman not having his Clothing and Accoutrements in 
proper order, shall pay a fine of One Shilling for each deficiency. 

nth. Resolved, 

That any Gentleman appearing on the Ground not accoutred according 
to Orders, will be subject to the usual fines, and be placed in the 
Awkward Squad on that day. 

1 2th. Resolved, 

That Punctuality and Precision being essential in all Military Operations 
it is therefore expected that every Gentleman will feel it a Point of 
Honour in being at his Post rather before the Time fixed, than one 
Minute after it ; Military time being always precise, whether so expressed 
or not. 

13th. Resolved, 

That the Roll be called at the moment specified, and the Squadron 
told off by the Junior Officer, and a return ready for the Commanding 
Officer on his appearing upon the Ground. 

14th. Resolved, 

That the Serjeants keep a Roll of their respective Troops, and 
collect and keep an account of the fines ; the amount of which to be 
paid to the Quarter-Master, with the names of those who have paid. 

iSth. Resolved, 

That the accounts of fines and the disbursement from that fund be 
inspected by the Officers and Non-commissioned Officers of their respective 
Troops, at least once in each half year. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. ^43 



1 6th. Resolved, 

That not less than Eight Shillings be collected from each Gentleman for 
the Troop Dinners ; and that on the day of the Review and his Majesty's 
Birth-day the Excess of the Bill be discharged from the Stock Purse, but 
on no other occasion. 

17th. Resolved, 

That upon any appearance of Tumult in the City of Norwich, or its 
neighbourhood, the Gentlemen in the Squadron, do immediatly Assemble 
(without waiting for summonses) in the Barrack-yard, on Horse-back, in 
Uniform, with their Swords and Pistols. 

1 8th. Resolved, 

That should any Gentlemen be permitted to leave the Squadron, he 
shall return the Clothing and Accoutrements allowed from the Corps. 

19th. Resolved, 

That Gentlemen losing any part of their Accoutrements through care- 
lessness, do replace them at their own expence. 

20th. Resolved, 

That Gentlemen desirous to enroll themselves in the Norwich Light 
Horse Volunteers, are desired to apply to the Commanding OfKcer. 

2 1 St. Resolved, 

That these Resolutions be signed by each Gentleman of the Squadron. 

22nd. Resolved, 

That Copies of these Resolutions be delivered to each Member of the 
Squadron. 

Exemptions. 

Illness, certified by a Physician or Surgeon. 
Attendance on Magistrates. 

JOHN HARVEY, 

Major, E.N.Y.C. 



The county had an immense advantage in having in the Marquis of 
Townshend a Lord-Lieutenant who was zealous and active in furthering 
the objects of the Government; and in the hundreds of letters of his 
Lordship's writing in connection with these matters there is in all an 
absolute devotion to the welfare of the county and an entire abnegation of 
his own advantage or convenience. 

He was assisted by very able officers, especially by Major-General 
Money, who resided at Crown Point, and whom I shall have occasion to 
mention further on. 



144 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803. 



The impetus given to the movement really took its final force from the 
meeting of Deputy-Lieutenants and Magistrates held in the Shire House 
on the 9th July, 1803, "for considering the most effectual measures for the 
defence of the county in event of actual invasion." 

The Marquis Townshend presided, when the resolutions which follow 
were passed : — 

'^ That it is the opinion of this meeting, that at the present important 
period, it is a duty incumbent upon persons of every description, voluntarily 
to come forward and use their utmost exertions for the defence of the country, 
and the preservation of our invaluable constitution ; and that their exertions 
should be prompt and vigorous, so as to defeat the attempts of an implacable 
enemy, aiming at the destruction of both." 



"That the Lord-Lieutenant be requested to carry into immediate 
execution the plans recommended by his Majesty's Government for establishing 
a system of communication throughout the county, and for rendering the 
body of the people instrumental to the defence of the county in event of 
invasion ; and that when hii Majesty shall have approved of the persons 
whom the Lord-Lieutenant shall have nominated to be Lieutenants of 
Divisions, Inspectors of Hundreds, and superintendents of parishes, that a 
list of their names, offices, and places of residence, be laid before the 
Deputy Lieutenants of the county at a general meeting. 

" That the Lord-Lieutenant of the county be requested to digest a 
plan for the approbation of the general commanding the district, pointing 
out the most eligible routes for conducting the movable property of the 
county, under the protection of the yeomanry cavalry, to secure depots, in 
the event of invasion." 

In pursuance of these resolutions a plan was prepared indicating the 
parts to which all the produce of the county and all stores might be 
removed. 

In case the enemy should attempt a descent on the Norfolk or Suffolk 
coast, the following was the plan suggested for driving back the produce of 
the county. After Ipswich, Yarmouth, Norwich, Lynn, and such other 
places on the coast as might be deemed necessary to defend, were sufficiently 
stocked from the supplies of the contiguous Hundreds, the remainder of the 
products of the two counties should be driven from Suffolk into the Isle of 
Ely, behind the Great Ouse River ; and from Norfolk into that part of 
Wisbeach Hundred situated between the Waldcrsea River and Shire drain. 
Yarmouth, Norwich, and Lynn to serve as three advanced magazines for the 
use of the army on the coast of Norfolk. It was probable two others might 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 145 



be desirable between Norwich and Lynn, and one such might be formed on 
the heights, south of East Rudham, near Fakenham ; another on Ling or 
Elsing Common behind the Wensum. As the grand depot near Wisbeach 
might be found at too great a distance to supply conveniently the advanced 
magazines in the Eastern parts of the county, an intermediate depot for 
the produce of the Eastern Hundreds might be formed on Ovington Common, 
near Watton. Ipswich would form an advanced magazine for the Suflfolk 
coast Between that place and Yarmouth, one might be placed at Saxted 
Green, on the heights above Framlingham — one at Ditchingham Green, near 
Bungay, beyond the Waveney, and an intermediate one, if necessary, at 
Ltnstead Green on the heights above Halesworth. It might also be desirable 
to have one at or near Bury St Edmund's or on Ixworth Heath. 

At this period, for the defence of Yarmouth, the undermentioned corps 
of Yeomanry offered themselves for permanent duty :-^ 

Norfolk Rangers, Major Marquis Townshend — 90. 

Yarmouth, Capt. Lacon — 55. 

Tunstead and Happing, Capt Laton — 67. 

Blofield and South Walsham, Capt. Burroughes — 58. 

Loddon and Clavering, Capt Smyth — 53. 

Norwich Light Horse, Major Harvey, 92. 

East Dereham, Capt Hyde — 6a 

Lynn and Freebridge, Major Taylor — 89. 

South Erpingham and Eynsford, Major Bulwer — ^42. 

Hingham, Capt AIpe — 

Swaffham, Capt Johnson — 

Wymondham, Capt Hon. W. Wodehouse — 

On this report reaching the King, his Majesty signified through the 
Right Hon. Charles Yorke that he was highly gratified by the zeal and 
alacrity manifested by the several Norfolk corps of Yeomanry in thus 
volunteering, and he directed that all officers and men doing this duty should 
receive the same pay as the regular forces and the Militia, and be entitled 
to be quartered and billeted as regular troops. 

On the 13th November, Lord Townshend submitted a plan of forming 
the several Yeomanry corps of the county into regiments, a course calculated 
to add much to their efficiency, and this having received the approval of the 
Government, the following regiments were formed : — 

First Regiment. 

Norfolk Rangers, 
Lynn and Freebridge, 



146 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 



Holkham, 

Smithdon and Brothercross, 

Marshland ... ... ... 350 

Second Regiment. 

East Dereham, 

SwafTham, 

South Erpingham, 

South Greenhoe, 

Hingham, 

Wymondham, 

Clackclose ... ... 408 

Third Regiment. 

Norwich Light Horse, 

Loddon and Clavering, 

Tunstead and Happing, 

Blofield and South Walsham ... 336 



Several gentlemen in the county offered to raise and furnish corps, as 
for instance Mr. Thomas Cubitt, of Horning, in the month of February 
proposed to raise a troop of fifty cavalry to serve within the Hundreds of 
Tunstead and Happing, extending between ten and twelve miles on the 
sea-coast, without asking for any allowance for pay, clothing or contingencies, 
except fifty-three sabres and belts, or in case of their being assembled for 
active service. 

Charles Loftus, in "My Youth by Sea and Land," says: — 

'' Great excitement prevailed at the time in my father's household in 
Norfolk, which was close to the sea. Upon one occasion, when my father 
and mother were in London, it was reported that the French had landed at 
a place called Weybourne, about six miles from our house. One of the 
principal tenants came up to the house to tell us that we had better have 
the horses and the carriage ready in case it should be necessary to start. 
Great was the excitement of the maids and the old housekeeper, who at 
once began to pack up our clothes and their own in the carriage trunks. 
The housekeeper stowed many things away in secret places, where she 
thought those French thieves, as she called them, would not find them. 
The farmers also were very busy harnessing the horses, ready to put them 
into the waggons to convey the poor people of the village out of reach of 
the enemy, should they advance. The yokels who had been trained every 
Sunday afternoon to the use of the musket and bayonet were mustered on 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1805. I47 



the church-green. In the midst of all this excitement the noise of drums 
and fifes was heard coming down the Wells Road. We children ran to 
the beach wall which looked over into the road. ' Lawk-a-mercy ! ' cried 
old Sally, the head nurse, 'what shall we do?' The old coachman ran out 
with his whip to see what was the matter. A horseman dashed past us up 
the road, crying out, 'They are coming!' at which announcement there 
was a general shriek among the maids. * Don't be such fules, you maids — 
they are the volunteers from Wells a coming to fight the French ! ' And 
sure enough, so they were. At their head rode Parson Tickel upon a 
Roxinante, very similar to that on which Don Quixote is described to have 
ridden when he set out upon his adventures. The drums and fifes kept 
playing to the lively tune of 'The girls we left behind us,' while the men 
went on with a quick and steady march. 

''This is a specimen of many similar scenes that occurred in various 
parts of the country, for the dread of the threatened French invasion was 
universal.'' 

Norfolk Rangers First West Regiment: 1803. 

Major Commandant ; The Marquis Townshend. 29 Sept 1794 

FIRST TROOP. 

Captain Sir Martin B. Folkes, Bart. 29 Sept 1794 

Lieut William Becher 3 May 1799 

Cornet Nicholas John Raven 3 May 1799 

Qr. Master Charles Money 

3 sergts. R Kiddle, B. Blyth, John Bamston 

2 corpla A. Smith, Jas. Wright 

Trumpeter Chas. Stewardson 

46 privates 

SECOND TROOP. 

Captain George Beauchamp 29 Sept 1794 

Lieut William Mason 29 Sept 1794 

Comet W. Money Hill 29 Aug 1798 

Qr. Master E. Drosier 

2 sergts. E. Stead man, Wm Goodwin. 

2 corpls. T. Flatten, John Bond 

Trumpt R. Winter 

45 privates. 

Total for the Norfolk Rangers 7 officers. 

2 quartermasters. 

102 rank and file. 



I4S 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 803. 





Third Regiment. 








WYMONDHAM TROOP. 






Captain 


Hon. William Wodehouse 


5 Sept 


1803 


Lieut 


John Darell 


n »« 


»» 


Cornet 


John Smith Wigg 


91 l> 


H 


Qr. Master 


Benjamin Redhead 






3 sergts. 


Francis Riches, Robt Barnard, T. 


Clarke. 




Trumpeter 


T. Cox 






41 privates 


SWAFFHAM TROOP. 






Captain 


John Micklethwaite 


22 June 


1798 


Lieut 


John Thorp 


W M 


>• 


Cornet 


Thomas Bullock 


»l 1* 


»» 


M 


Ralph Caldwell 


13 Sept 


1801 


I Qr. master and 37 rank and file 








TUN8TBAD AND HAPPING TROOP. 






Captain 


Charles Laton 


17 April 179s 


Lieut. 


Thomas Cubitt 


I) >t 


>l 


>* 


George Cubitt 


»« >i 


l> 


Qr. Master 


John Ikin 






3 sergts. 


Daniel Scott, Thos Dyball, John 


Swan 




3 corpls. 


Edwd. Morse, John Coman, John 


Burcham 




Trumpeter 


Robert Withers 






58 privates 








ToUl for this 


corps is II officers. 

3 quartermasters. 
147 rank and file. 







Norwich Light Horse Volunteers. 

Major Commandant John Harvey 23 July 1803 

Surgeon Edward Colman 24 Dec 1803 

Chapla^in Rev. Samuel Forster „ „ „ 



Captain 
Lieut 
Comet 
Qt Master 
2 sergts. 
2 corpls. 
Trumpt 
43 privates 



If 



FIRST TROOP. 

Edward Hussey 

Anthony Hudson 

Samuel Mitchell 

Crisp Brown 

Joseph Cocky Thomas Chamberlain 

Thos. Coote, Geo. Hardy 

David Gattey 



33 July 1803 
23 July 



>» 



»i 



>i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 803. 



149 







SECOND TROOP. 




Captain 




Roger Hayes 


27 Aug 1803 


Lieut 








Comet 




John Kerrison 


12 Nov 1803 


Qt Master 




Richd Watson 




2 sergts. 




Daniel Spalding, Robert 


Heath 


I corpl. 




John Riches 




43 privates 








Total for this 


corps 


is 8 officers. 

2 quartermastera 
86 rank and file. 





Captain 
Lieut 
Comet 
Qt Master 
3 sergeants 

3 Corporals 
Tmmpetcr 
47 privates 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

Qt Master 

4 sergeants 
4 corporals 

Trumpeter 
49 privates. 

Captain 
Lieut 
Cornet 
Qt Master 
I sergt. major 



u 



Independent Troops. 

BLOFIBLD AND SOUTH WALSHAM TROOP. 

James B. Burroughes i8 March 1795 

William Heath 

John Sibell 

John Leath 

Benj. Barber, Geo. Baker, J. Heath. 

Chas. Grymes, Robt Hope, Thos. Saul. 

Robert Read 



f> 



N 



n 



i» 



BAST DEREHAM TROOP. 



29 Oct 1802 



» 



3 May 1799 
10 Dec 1803 



John Hyde 

Edmund Wodehouse 

Thomas Munnings 

Samuel King 

Thomas Crafer 

Will Palmer, James Kirbell, Sam. Kendall, J. Filby 

John Gardiner, John Chapling, Christopher Utting, 

Thos. Smith. 

William Atkinson 



DEREHAM TROOP. 

John Crisp 

Thos. Nelson 

John Sparrow Webster 

Robert Cooper 

John Abel 



22 June 1798 



%% 



n 



24 Aug 1 801 



I50 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1803. 



2 sergts. 


John Norton, John Beckham 




4 corpls. 


James Nicholson, Willm. Liddelow, Willnt Catton 




Jonathan Davy 




Trumpt 


Christopher Blade 




41 privates 


BRPINOHAM AND BYNB8FORD TKOOP. 




Captain 


William Earle Bulwer 


16 March 1797 


Lieut 


John HoUey 


n 19 »f 


Coraet 


George Wymer, junr 


19 tl n 


Qt Master 


Thomas Cook 




3 sergts. 


Willm Foxhall, Thomas Partridge, Stephen Reeve 


3 corpls. 


Israel Neal, John Girling, Martin Harsant 


33 privates 


HINGBAM TROOP. 




Captain 


Hamond Alpe 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


James Murray 


28 Dec 1796 


Cornet 


Philip Heath 


n II If 


Adjutant 


James Murray 


31 May 1798 


Qt Master 


T. C. Watson 




4 sergts. 


C. Gilman, A. Abell, Thos. 


Catton, T. Watson 


4 corpls. 


Jo. Howlett, F. Sippings, Jas. 


Vincent, Wm. Goring 


Trumpt 


Wm. Gittey 




51 privates 


LODDON TROOP. 




Captain 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


91 II II 


Cornet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 


9* II W 


Qt Master 


Henry Good 




3 sergts. 


Thos. Ingram, Robt Bunfellow, John Lowden 


3 corpls. 


John Crabb, John Buxton, Saml. Maners 


Trumpt. 


Henry Field 




50 privates 


FREBBRIDOB LYNN TROOP. 




Captain 


Joseph Taylor 


19 July 1798 


Lieut 


John Lloyd 


It II If 


Comet 


Henry Blencowes 


16 Aug 1799 


I Qr. Master and 39 rank and file. 






YARMOUTH TROOP. 




Captain 


Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut 


William Palgrave 


20 June 1798 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1803-4. 151 



Cornet Richard Ferrier 20 June 1798 

Qr. Master Thomas Ruxby 

Pay Master clerk Thomas Kendle 

3 sergts. Wm. Howard, Thos. Jay, John Beckett 

3 corpls. Wm. Last, Arms A)rton, Wm. Smith 

Trumpt. Robert Brightman 

54 privates 

The total yeomanry for the county, 52 officers. 

730 rank and file. 



i8o4» 

Throughout the year 1804 the hostile preparations, both naval and 
military, were carried on in the neighbourhood of Boulogne, and on 
other points of the French coast, with the most persevering activity ; 
and although these formidable demonstrations did not lead to any 
attempt at invasion, they kept alive that patriotic enthusiasm which had 
so conspicuously burst forth in the preceding year, and afforded a 
constant stimulus to the military spirit of the country. 

From the Norfolk Chronicle of January 5th, 1804, we learn that 
" Yesterday sennight the 2nd troop of East Dereham Loyal Cavalry, com- 
manded by Capt Crisp, left Yarmouth and arrived at Dereham on Saturday 
afternoon, after having performed their regular routine of garrison duty at the 
former place. In passing through Caister the corps were halted and elegantly 
entertained with a sumptuous cold collation and a variety of choicest wines, 
etc, by Mr. Brandford of that place. Such a mark of respect and token of 
loyalty naturally excited the warmest gratitude of the troop. On their arrival 
at Dereham, they were congratulated by a vast concourse of people, amidst 
the ringing of bells, and before they were dispersed, the Captain read to them 
the orders from General Milner, thanking them for their very orderly and good 
conduct during their stay at Yarmouth. The officers and a great part of the 
troops dined together at the Kings Arms, and the evening was concluded with 
the character of the British nation." 



Thus terminated for the present the service which most of our corps of 
Volunteer Cavalry and Infantry undertook with such commendable alacrity. 
It is but justice to the several corps to add that they performed the duties 
required of them with spirit and honour. 



On January 13th Mr. T. W. Coke was promoted to be Lieutenant-Colonel 









152 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1804. 



of the Western Regiment of Yeomanry, Mr. Hammond Alpe to be Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Eastern Rq^iment, and Mr. John Smyth to be Lieutenant-Colonel 
of the Midland Regiment 

On February 27th colours were presented to the East Dereham troop of 
Yeomanry by Mrs. Smyth, on behalf of the ladies of the town and neighbour- 
hood. The troop, accompanied by Capt Leeder's corps of infantry, attended 
service at the parish church, where the colours were ^ consecrated by prayer/' 
and the sermon was preached by the Rev. George Preston, curate. A dinner 
followed at the King's Arms Ipn. 

The popularity of the force was still evidently great, for on January 1 3th, 
1804, the Wymondham troop were presented with colours by Lady Wodehouse. 
Therefore we read in the Norfolk Chronicle for January 21st, that 

'*The Wymondham troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by the 
Hon. Capt Wm. Wodehouse, attended at Kimberley, on the 1 3th to return to 
Lady Wodehouse thanks for their colours, lately presented by her Ladyship, 
when they had the honour of dining with the family. The conviviality of the 
day was much heightened by appropriate toasts and songs, and the troop 
departed, highly gratified with the hospitality and great attention of their 
noble host and hostess.'' 



January 21st, 1804. 
" Monday sennight, the Swaflfham troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, were 
elegantly entertained at the Assembly Rooms, by their commander Capt R 
Johnson, when many loyal and patriotic toasts were drunk, and the greatest 
harmony and festivity prevailed. In the course of the evening, an elq^ant set 
of glass ware was displayed, on which was inscribed with gold letters, ' A 
Tribute of Gratitude, presented by the Swaffham troop to Capt R. 
Johnson, their commander, for his gentlemanly and soldier-like conduct whilst 
doing garrison duty at Yarmouth, 1803.'" 

According to a letter printed in the Norfolk Chronicle of January 21st 
1804, from Mr. Secretary Yorke, to the Lords-Lieutenant of counties, adjutants 
and seigeants-majors on permanent pay were to be allowed to volunteer corps 
in the following manner : — 

Cavalry — To every corps consisting of not less than three hundred 
effective rank and file of cavalry, an adjutant on permanent pay will be 
allowed (pay when not called out into actual service 6s, per day, 2s, for a horse 
per day). 

To every corps of cavalry under three hundred rank and file, but consisting 
of not less than three troops of forty effective rank and, file each, a sergeant* 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1804. 153 



major will be allowed on permanent pay (pay when not called out into actual 
service 3^. i \d, per day, including 9^ for horse). 

Adjutants are to be recommended by the Lords Lieutenants for his 
Majesty's approbation, and must have served at least four years as commissioned 
officers, or as sergeants-majors in the regulars, embodied militia, fencibles, or 
East Indian Company's service. Sergeants-majors may be appointed by the 
commandant of the corps, but they must have at least three years as non- 
commissioned officers in the regular army, embodied militia, or fencibles. 



Norfolk Chronicle^ February 4th| 1804. 

"The Norfolk Rangers, commanded by the Marquis Townshend, were 
inspected on Saturday sennight at Rainham, in marching order, by Col. 
Keppel, who expressed his approbation of their military appearance, and the 
skilfulness of their manceuvres." 

''The Mounted Riflemen of the Norfolk Rangers met at Coxford 
Heath on Monday last to fire at a target, representing a French soldier, 
which they practised with such success, as to inspire every confidence in 
result, whenever they shall be opposed to an invading enemy." 

"Yesterday, sennight, the Loddon troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, com- 
manded by Lieut-Col. Smyth, and the Norwich squadron of Light Horse» 
commanded by Major Harvey, were inspected by Colonel Metzner, on Burgh 
Apton Common. They performed their evolutions, with their usual precision 
and rapidity, and received the Colonel's highest approbation." 



Norfolk CkronicU^ February 4th, 1804. 

"On Friday sennight the North Elmham Volunteers commanded by 
Capt Hopson were inspected in Mr Milles park by Col. Keppel, who very 
highly complimented the corps, for their steady marching, wheeling, and 
manoeuvring, which the colonel declared far exceeded his expectations (the 
arms having arrived but the evening before). It is but justice to observe 
they are a fine body of men, and, three or four excepted, all inhabitants of 
the parish of Elmham ; the only parish in the Hundred of Launditch that 
has formed a volunteer corpa On Sunday last they made their first appear- 
ance in uniform (scarlet jackets, and blue pantaloons) and were attended 
to church by 10 of their townsmen, belonging to Major Hyde's Norfolk 
Cavalry, in the military dress of the troop, exhibiting in a small village 100 
of its inhabitants engaged in the service of their King and country." 

Norfolk Chronicle^ February 4th, 1804 
" The East Dereham Loyal Volunteer Cavalry on Monday last met in 



154 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1804. 



the Market place of that town, and received their colours from the hands 
of Mrs. Smyth, who presented the same in the names of the ladies of 
Dereham and its neighbourhood to Capt Crisp, who having expressed the 
sense of the distinguished honour conferred upon him, addressed his troops 
then drawn up, in a speech suitable to the occasion ; strongly recommending 
a continuance of their services in the important cause, in which they were 
engaged ; at the same time observing that they had now the priviledge of 
withdrawing ; when highly to their credit, all of them seemed unanimous to 
continue their services in their duty to their King and country. The troop, 
accompanied by Captain Leeder's corps of infantry, afterwards repaired to 
church, where the colours were consecrated by a prayer, and excellent 
sermon was preached by the Rev. George Preston, curate of the parish. The 
troop with many of the neighbouring gentlemen dined together at the King's 
Arms, where many loyal toasts were drank, and the afternoon spent with 
great conviviality, and in the evening there was an assembly." 



Norfolk Chronicle^ February 4th, 1804. 

''The military force of this island, including the volunteers and sea 
fencibles, amounts according to the late returns nearly to six hundred and 
thirty thousand men." 



Norfolk Chronicle, March 3rd, 1804. 

"Yarmouth, ist March, 1804. 
" Saturday last the Yarmouth volunteer cavalry and infantry were 
reviewed by Lieut-Col. Metzner, who complimented them on their improve- 
ment in military discipline." 



"The Tunstead and Happing troop, commanded by Major Laton, was 
inspected by Lieut-Col. Muttimer at Wroxham, last week. Major-Genl. 
Money was present, as Colonel of the regiment it belongs to. Both the 
General and the Colonel were so pleased with its appearance, the strength 
it had mustered, the attention, and high discipline it had arrived at, that 
both declared it was their duty to thank the officers and gentlemen of the troop, 
for their exertions, which they did in a handsome address, acknowledging 
very few regular troops could excel them, and the report to his Majesty 
will be accordingly." 

There is also an announcement that the Norfolk Rangers were appointed 
to assemble for field exercise. "Their high order and discipline are well 
known throughout the county. On the last day of exercise they will dine 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 804. 155 



together at Fakenham to celebrate their 22nd anniversary of the birth of 
their most noble commander, the Marquis of Townshend, who will then 
complete his eightieth year/' 

It also announces that "The officers of the East Norfolk Yeomanry 
Regiment will dine together on the 17th inst. at the King's Head, Market 
Place, Norwich, at half-past three o'clock precisely," 



Norfolk Chronicle, March 24, 1804. 

"The Marquis of Townshend's Birthday. 

** Monday sennight, being the anniversary of the birthday of our worthy 
and highly esteemed Lord Lieut, the Marquis Townshend, the corps of 
Norfolk Rangers gave an elegant and sumptuous entertainment to the officers 
of the neighbouring yeomanry and volunteers, in honour of the event. The 
corps having previously finished their monthly field days, proceeded to 
Fakenham, where having formed in the market place, it fired a feu de joie, 
which fully shewed to the numerous spectators, and no small assemblage of 
beauty which graced the surrounding windows, that steadiness and high 
discipline for which this corps has always been celebrated. After which they 
set down to a most excellent dinner and delicious dessert, which was provided 
from town on the occasion. His Majesty's health was drunk with most 
heartfelt joy, which was succeeded by that of the noble Marquis, the founder 
of our gallant yeomanry and volunteers, many other loyal and constitutional 
toasts were drunk on the occasion, beer was distributed to the populace in 
the evening, which ended in conviviality and rejoicings throughout the whole 
neighbourhood." 



Norfolk Chronicle, March 24th, 1804. 

The following is an extract from a letter transmitted to Lords Lieuts. of 
Counties by the Secretary of State. 

'* Whitehall. March 5th 

" My Lord, 

" It appearing that the instructions and discipline of such corps of 
Yeomanry and Volunteers of the maritime counties, as have been placed on 
permanent pay and duty by his Majestys order on the existing appearance of 
invasion have been essentially promoted by that measure ; and there being 
reasons to believe, that many of the remaining volunteer corps in the different 
parts of Gt. Britain, are ready and willing to assemble under the authority of 
his Majesty for this purpose. 

" I have therefore received his Majesty's command to request a confidential 



1 56 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 804. 



communication of your opinion, whether any and which of the Yeomanry 
corps, being already and properly armed and equiped are likely upon his 
Majesty's invitation to assemble on permanent pay and duty, for a period not 
exceeding a month nor less than ten days. 

" I beg leave to remind your Lordship that his Majesty is empowered by 
the 42nd Geo. III., c. 66, s. 10, to invite any Yeomanry or Volunteer corps 
voluntarily to assemble and march on the appearance of invasion, and that all 
such corps as shall voluntarily assemble, as expressed in that clause, are 
entitled to pay and quarters and subject to military discipline, during the time 
they shall continue so assembled." 

May 21 — "The 3rd Regt of Norfolk Gentlemen and Yeomanry Cavalry, 
under the command of Major General Money, which marched in here on 
Monday for five days exercise, was reviewed by Major General Milner on 
Thursday last at Hellesdon. The General arrived on the ground, about eleven 
oclock, and was received by the regiment in line with due honours. After 
marching in review order before him in half ranks, and also in single files, the 
r^ment went through the various evolutions, and chained by squadrons and 
in line, in very capital style, to the great satisfaction of the Greneral, and of 
every one present. Had the weather proved favourable the Royal Artillery, 
and the 24th regiment of foot would have been on the ground. A detachment 
of the Norwich rifle corps attended, and lined the hedges at one end of the 
field, and as the skirmishing parties of the cavalry advanced, commenced an 
independent fire upon them ; they afterwards closed, and when the cavalry 
charged by squadrons, kept up a firing in close order on the spot We are 
happy to addy that not a single accident of serious consequence has occurred to 
any of the gentlemen of this respectable regiment, in the course of their five 
days exercise. A horse however, belonging to Mr Tallant of Saxlingham, had 
his thigh so dreadfully fractured by a kick from another horse, during the 
practice on Wednesday, as to make it necessary to shoot him on the spot It 
is understood that government will allow a certain sum towards the purchase 
of another horse, and a subscription has been entered into by the gentlemen of 
the Norwich squadron of which he was a member to make good any 
deficiency." 



The most remarkable feature arising out of the threatened invasion by 
the French was that spontaneous outburst of patriotism which, perhaps, in no 
part of England was more manifest than in Norfolk. We read of regiments of 
Yeomanry Cavalry being raised and brought to a high state of discipline ; of 
battalions of volunteers formed in the various divisions of the county ; and 
of Sea Fencibles who lined the coast from the Wash to the mouth of the Yare, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1804. ^57 

Volunteer cavalry and infantry marched from the inland districts and did 
their turn of permanent duty at Yarmouth and other places on the seaboard ; 
there were reviews at Norwich, and sham fights at Bramerton and Hellesdon ; 
drilling, burnishing, pipe-cla)dng appeared to be the principal occupations of 
all the inhabitants in every small town in the county ; and 

"On every heath, on eveiy strand, 
New -raised battalions graced the land.*' 

Thus in June, 1804, when Major-General Money was appointed to the 
staff of the Eastern District, he had under his command no fewer than 
thirty-two thousand men, ready to give the French a suitable reception. How 
did these old Volunteers acquit themselves under arms ? Well, the inspecting 
officers, as a rule, made complimentary reports as to their drill and discipline, 
and after all there is little ground for the statement that their antique weapons 
would have been more dangerous to themselves than to the enemy. Accidents 
happened occasionally from the careless use of firearms, but on the whole the 
casualties were singularly few. On the afternoon of Sunday, February 4th, 
1804, the Cromer Sea Fencibles were testing their guns on the sands with 
canister and grape-shot, when Captain Tremlett, the commanding officer, and 
Mr. John Smith, a surgeon practising in the town, walked from the firing point 
to a spot near the target on the beach to observe the effects of the missiles. A 
ball which had diverged considerably from the h'ne of fire, struck the captain 
on the foot, and forced a portion of his boot into the flesh, and so badly 
shattered the leg of Mr. Smith as to necessitate the immediate amputation of 
the limb. In the following year, a man named Hardingham, who belonged to 
the Norwich Rifle Corps, was leaning on his rifle after target practice, when 
the weapon exploded, and killed him instantly. These are the only records 
we have of serious accidents to the brave defenders of these day& 

June nth — '^ A sham fight, in which all the regular and auxiliary troops 
stationed in Norwich were engaged, took place at Bramerton. A pontoon 
bridge, formed of wherries, was made use of in the course of the operations." 

The 3rd or Eastern Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry appear to have been 
the most active, probably owing to their situation in a more exposed district 
In order to make his command as useful as possible, Major General Money 
raised a company of cavalry pioneers to act with his regiment, and then added 
two companies of sharp-shooters. Captain Brown was placed in command of 
the former, while Captain Pillans had charge of the latter. 



Norfolk Chronicle, August 4th, 1804. 
'^ In consequence of a circular letter from Major General Money to the 



158 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1804. 



East Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry cavalry — of which he is colonel — two 
companies of sharpshooters have been raised in addition to the company of 
cavalry pioneers, which had been previously raised, and which is now com- 
pletely armed and clothed. These sharpshooters will also be added to this 
regiment, and the object of raising them is, to cover the pioneers when at work, 
when cutting apertures in the hedges, either for the advance or the retreat of 
the cavalry, in an inclosed country, and to prevent the necessity of detaching 
any of the pioneers for that purpose ; this plan, which was first suggested by 
General Money, has been highly approved by the Commander in Chief." 



Norfolk Chronicle t September 29th, 1804. 

'* An encampment on a small scale and the representation of an action 
took place at Hellesdon field on Monday last. The Third or East Norfolk 
Regiment of yeomanry cavalry, with Capt Brown's company of cavalry 
pioneers, and Capt Pillan's company of sharpshooters (clothed in dark green, 
with black belts, etc., etc.) assembled about nine o'clock on castle meadow, with 
the tilted carts, and horses belonging to each respective troop, and the 
waggons marked and numbered and fitted up with seats for the conveyance 
of the pioneers and sharpshooters. 

''Major Gen. Money, attended by his aide-de-camp Mr. Money and 
Brigade Major Loftus, arrived soon after, when the whole in complete marching 
order for actual service (the pioneers and sharpshooters in the waggons) pro- 
ceeded to Hellesdon, where several marques and tents were pitched in two 
lines ; the pioneers formed the guard of the camp ; after the cavalry had 
passed in review order before the General (their colonel) they went through the 
principal evolutions of a field day and made their charges in squadrons etc. 
greatly to his satisfaction ; the officers and men then partook of some refresh- 
ment under canvas and again mounted their chai^ers awaited the arrival of the 
volunteer infantry. 

" About two o'clock, Lieut.-Col. Patteson's battalion of volunteers, marched 
to Hellesdon and took a position on an eminence on the right of the encamp- 
ment, to support the cavalry. The Norwich regiment of volunteers infantry, 
commanded by Lieut-Col. Harvey, with two pieces of artillery, under Major 
Fyers, and the Norwich rifle corps under Major Bacon, marched from the 
castle meadow soon afterwards, and entered Hellesdon Field by the Aylsham 
Road, as the hostile force. 

" The cavalry were drawn up in front of the camp, in three squadrons, 
under the commands of Lieut-Col. Smyth, Major Laton and Major J. 
Harvey. 

'' The sham fight commenced between the Norwich rifle corps, and Capt. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 804. 1 59 



Pillan's sharpshooters, when the latter being driven in, the Norwich regiment 
marched forward in columns of sub divisions and having formed line, the 
artillery on the flanks fired two rounds, and obliged the cavalry to retreat and 
abandon their encampment, at the moment Colonel Patteson's battalion 
quitted their position on the hilly and formed line in front of the camp ; the 
Norwich regiment advanced in line, and a well supported fire was kept up 
between the two corps ; first by divisions from left to right, afterwards by grand 
divisions, and then by wings ; whilst the infantry were thus engaged, the 
cavalry rallied on the left of the camp, came down in squadrons upon the rear 
of the Norwich regiment, and made their charges, which terminated the 
offensive operations. The cavalry then filed off, and quitted the ground. The 
Volunteer infantry and the rifle corps passed the General in parade order and 
then marched home. Although the weather proved very unpropitious, the 
muster of both horse and foot were respectable, and the concourse of spectators 
were immense. The appearance of the camp in the valley, and the hills 
covered with people of all ranks and degrees, in carriages, on horseback, 
and on foot to witness the military spectacle, rendered the scene at once 
interesting and picturesque : not a single accident occurred." 

''On the 1 2th of August, 1804, Major General Money was appointed to 
the command of the 3rd or Eastern Yeomanry Cavalry regiment of Norfolk. 
Writing to Lord Hawkesbury on this, he says, 'With three companies of 
unmounted men attached — one of the companies are cavalry pioneers. 
They are trained as sharpshooters, to act as such when occasion may require.' 
He mentions his intention to ' persevere and raise a battalion of them, being 
persuaded that they are the best troops that can be raised in this enclosed 
country, and require less training, and more congenial to the mode of life 
with the peasantry than the long and teadious drills, to render men equal 
to a situation with troops of the line, which they never can attain with only 
twenty-four days exercise, when ten days is sufficient to make a good sharp- 
shooter.' " 



In an address printed in 1804 by General Money, he points out that 
Norfolk is a county in which sharpshooters are mostly required. " You must 
be sensible there is no possibility for cavalry to approach an enemy in such an 
enclosed county as this, or retire from them when pressed by a superior force, 
unless openings are made for us to advance and retire by." He also dwells on 
the importance of pioneers to cut the hedges when occasion should require in 
case of invasion. He also propounded a plan for Volunteer Artillery, " of a 
nature perfectly novel, which with much ease and little expense could be put 
in practice." His plan was to mount light guns in the strong corn waggons of 
the farmers that were capable of carrying sixty cwt A nine or twelve 



i6o The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1804. 



pounder would not weigh more than twenty cwt, and ten such guns would not 
cost more than jf 150 a year. Such portable batteries would be most valuable 
in the rural districts, and for the defence of the various passes in this county ; 
they could be rapidly moved along the coast, with their cannoniers in the 
waggons, and in the maritime towns the guns could be worked by the Sea 
Fencibles. They would afford great protection to the shipping which passes 
along the Norfolk coast Such a battery would, in fact, be a frigate on wheels. 
^ At any of the passes in this county, a work in one nights time might be 
thrown up, not only capable of defending the men from any rolling shot, but 
sufficient to cover them from any shot but such as came from battering 
cannon." This plan of General Money having been submitted to Captain 
Fyers, commanding the Norfolk Artillery, he gave it as his opinion that it was 
of great value, especially in defending such a pass as that at Acle, where with 
a gun or two of long range and a breastwork (which a ploughman could throw 
up in a couple of hours), it would be most important 

There is a Parliamentary return, which was ordered to be printed 7th May, 
1804, showing all the corps of Yeomanry Cavalry that were placed on 
permanent pay and duty in the United Kingdom during the past twelve 
months. It shows that some of them were embodied for as long as a month, 
and though they were seldom or never required at this period to actually use 
their weapons in aid of the civil power, yet there is little doubt that but for the 
existence and presence of the Yeomanry there would have been a good deal 
of serious rioting and trouble ; for except parish constables there were no 
police of any description, and no means of dealing with a tumultuous assembly 
except by military force. 

A return presented to Parliament this year of the Yeomanry Corps whose 
services had been accepted by his Majesty contains the following : — 

Blofield and South Walsham, 56 men 

Dereham, 44 

Hingham, 64 

Loddon, 53 

Lynn and Freebridge, 89 

Norfolk Rangers, 80 

Norwich Light Horse, 92 

SwafTham, 34 

South Erpingham, 42 

Tunstead and Happing, 6j 

Yarmouth, 55 

Smithdon and Brothercross, 26 

Clackclose, 47 



\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 804. 



161 



Twyford, 52 
Wymondham, 55 
Total, 866 

The Government also requested to be supplied with a return of the 
efficiency of the several Yeomanry Corps in Norfolk, and the qualifications 
were to be given under three classes. The first class, " corps that are in the 
greatest state of forwardness in discipline, so as to be fit to be employed in any 
situation to which a Yeomanry corps can be called." 

Lieut-Col. Frederick Keppel, late of the 88th regt. of foot (Connaught 
Rangers), and Colonel Frederick Metzner, late of the Oxfordshire Fencible 
Cavalry, reported that the Norfolk Yeomanry came under this head. 



First or West Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1804. 



Colonel 
Lt Colonel 
Major 
Adjutant 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Comet 



Major 
Captain 

II 
Lieut 

II 
Cornet 

II 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Cornet 



Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 



George, Marquis Townshend 
Thomas William Coke 
George Beauchamp 
William Becher 



10 Dec 1803 
10 Jan 1804 



II 



II 



>i 



17 Feb 1804 Capt 



HOLKHAM TROOP 




Thomas William Coke 


16 Sept 1803 


Edmund Rolfe 


II M 11 


Robert Ward 


II II II 


LYNN AND FRESBRIDGE SQUADRON 




Joseph Taylor 


15 July 1803 


John Lloyd 


If II II 


Samuel Sayer 


M II »l 


John Etchels 


II II II 


John Lancaster 


3 Feb 1804 


William Crisp 


91 *l II 


Thomas Jackson 


II »l II 


NORFOLK RANGERS TROOP 




Sir M. Browne Folkes, Bt. 


29 Sept 1794 


W. Money Hill 


19 May 1804 


Nicholas John Raven 


3 May 1799 


SMITHDON AND BROTHERCROSS TROOP 




William Hoste 


13 Aug 1803 


Gwynne Etheridge 


12 Nov 1803 


John Oakes 


II II •» 



1 62 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1804. 





SWAFFHAM TROOP 




Captain 


Richard Johnson 


12 Nov 1803 


Lieut 


John Thorp 


22 June 1798 


M 


Lawrence Wm. Stevens 


II Oct 1803 


Comet 

AM 


Thomas Bullock 
Thomas Rogerson 
Charles Jeffery 
trumpt, 37 privates 


22 June 1798 


99 

Qr. Master 

3 sergts., 3 corpls., i 








TWYFORD TROOP 




Captain Com' 


Coulsey Savory 


31 Jan 1804 


Captain 


John Pike 


»» »• w 


Lieut 


John Andrews Girling 


» M 9> 


Cornet 


John Bird 


91 t> H 


Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk 


Veomanry Cavalry : 1804 


Lt.-Colonel com*' 


William Earle Bulwer 


10 Dec 1803 


lA-CoIonel 


Hammond Alpe 


7 Jan 1804 


Major 


John Hyde 


91 N 19 


Adjutant 


James Murray 

CLACKCLOSE TROOP 


•1 9) 99 


Captain 


William Lee 


5 Sept 1803 


Lieut. 


Hugh Wool! 


99 99 99 


Cornet 


James Lee 

DEREHAM TROOP 


99 n 99 


Captain 


John Crisp 


22 June 1798 


Lieut 


Thomas Nelson 


fl 99 91 


Cornet 


John Sparrow Webster 

EAST DEREHAM TROOP 


24 Aug 1801 


Captain 


John Hyde 


29 Oct 1802 


Lieut. 


Edmund Wodehouse 


» 91 19 


» 


John Potter Hamilton 




Cornet 


Thomas Munnings 


3 May 1799 


(I 


Samuel King 


10 Dec 1803 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1804. 



163 





SOUTH ERPINGHAM AMD EYNESFORD TROOP 




Captain 


William Earle Bulwer i6 March 


1797 


Lieut. 


John Holley „ „ 


y^ 


Cornet 


George Wymer „ „ 

SOUTH GREENHOE TROOP 


i» 


Captain 


Robert Wilson 23 July 


1803 


Lieut 






Comet 













Third or East Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry : 1804, 



Colonel 
Lt-Colonel 
Major 
Adjutant 


John Money 
John Smyth 
Charles Laton 
Roger Hayes 




PIONEERS 


Captain 
1st Lieut 
2nd Lieut. 


Crisp Brown 
Daniel Bloom 
William Heath 




DISMOUNTED SHARPSHO 


Captain 

1st Lieut 
2nd Lieut 


David Betson 
William Cooch Pillans 
Henry Harmer 
James Sayer 




BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSI 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


William Heath 
John Sibell 
William Jary 




LODDON TROOP 



Capt. & Lt-CoL John Smyth 
Lieut William Carpenter 

Cornet Thomas Alday Kerrison 



10 Dec 


1803 


14 Jan 


T804 


7 Jan 


1804 


14 March 


1804 


18 June 


1804 


f> >i 


>i 


4» 


>9 


20 July 


1804 


7 Aug 


1804 


25 Aug 


1804 


10 Jan 


1804 


>t >i 


»» 


>» i> 


»» 


9 Dec 


1794 


It n 


If 


i» « 


>l 



164 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 804, 





NORWICH LIGHT HORSE SgUADRON 






Major 


John Harvey 


23 July 


1803 


Captain 


Roger Hayes 


27 Aug 


1803 


fi 


Anthony Hudson 


24 Feb 


1804 


Lieut 


Samuel Mitchell 


24 Dec 


1803 


n 


Charles Tompson 


24 Feb 


1804 


Comet 


Robert John Harvey 


23 July 


1803 


II 


John Kerrison 


12 Nov 


1803 


•« 


Crisp Brovtrn 


24 Dec 


1803 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Forster 


It II 


II 


Surgeon 


Edward Col man 

TUNSTSAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


i» 11 


II 


' Capt. & Major 


Charles Laton 


17 April 


1795 


Lieut 


Thomas Cubitt 


II ft 


II 


Cornet 


Daniel Scott 

WYMONDHAM TROOP 


24 April 


1804 


Captain 


Hoa William Wodehouse 


S Sept 


1803 


Lieut 


John Darell 


II II 


n 


Cornet 


John Smith Wigg 


If i> 


fl 


Qr. Master 


Benjamin Redhead 






3 sergts. 


S. Parsons, Robt Barnard, T. 


Clarke 




Trumpeter 


T. Cox 






44 privates 


YARMOUTH TROOP 






Captain 


Edmund Knowles Lacon 


25 June 


1803 


Lieut 


William Palgrave 


20 June 


1798 


Comet 


Richard Ferrier 


11 II 


II 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Lovick Cooper 


6 Dec 


1803 


Surgeon 


William Taylor 


II II 


II 



CHAPTER IV. 

1805 to 181 5. 

Circular Letter to Yeomanry Corps from the Assistant Adjutant-General — 
Condition of Yeomanry in 1805 — Telegraph between Yarmouth^ 
Norwich^ and London, 1807 — Presentation to Captain Darell, 1808 — 
Yeomanry Stag Hunt, 1809 — Peace Rejoicings, 181 3 — Yeomanry 
Escapades, iSi^— Riot at King's Lynn, i%i/^— Norwich Rioty 181 5 — 
Lord SidmoutKs Letter to Yeomanry Commanding Officers, 181 5. 

At the opening of the year 1805, the French army on the heights of 
Boulogne continued inactive, though in so menacing an attitude as to allow 
of no relaxation in the state of preparation on the opposite coast. During 
the spring and summer months the Norfolk Yeomanry were constantly 
exercised under their officers, and generally met once a week for instruction 
and exercise. 

The Record Office papers do not include any mobilisation scheme in the 
event of invasion for 1 804.-5, similar to that drawn up by Sir D. Dundas in 
1796; so it cannot be ascertained what part the Yeomanry were intended 
to play, and in what proportion they would have been released for service 
at the front from that " insurance of internal tranquility," which is all that 
is assigned to them at this date ; but if absence of complaints from the 
Secretary of State's common letter book is any sign, the spirit of the force 
was good, and they were as anxious to meet the enemy as their successors 
were in 1900. 

I have already adverted to the inactivity which, in the early part of the 
preceding year, appeared to prevail in the army of France, with respect to 
the threatened attack upon England. This inactivity on the part of the 
French ruler, who it will be recollected had then recently been elevated to 
the dignity of Emperor, was probably connected with the extraordinary 
proceeding, which in his new character he thought proper to adopt, of 
addressing a letter personally to the King of Great Britain, in which he 
made specious proposals for bringing about a peace between the two 
nations. This letter was replied to in the ordinary course through his 



1 66 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1805. 

Majesty's Secretary of State, and in the reply the necessity of acting in 
concert with the Continental allies of Great Britain having been insisted 
upon, the assumed pacific disposition of Bonaparte was converted into the 
most unmeasured hostility. In his message to his senate, he denounced 
England as the only obstacle to peace, and as the fomenter of discord in 
Europe through her hatred to France. This furious declaration was followed 
by the most active measures. Spain was unwillingly compelled to renew 
the war, in which Holland, by the same compulsion, was called upon to 
take an active part. The two latter countries were especially put forward 
to co-operate in the combined naval attack with which Great Britain was 
threatened, and extensive preparations were immediately ordered in all the 
forts and arsenals from the Texel to Cadiz. These armaments were continued 
through the whole of the summer, whilst at the same time the army at 
Boulogne was continually receiving accessions of troops, and unceasingly 
exercising in embarkation and disembarkation, with other preparatory 
movements. No indications were, however, observed of an intention of 
carrying these menaces into execution until August, 1805, when information 
was suddenly received of the embarkation of large bodies of troops in the 
Ports of Holland, of a fleet of men-of-war being ready to sail from thence, 
and of increased preparations at Boulogne, and its neighbourhood. On 
receipt of this intelligence by his Majesty's Government, notice was 
immediately given to all Yeomanry and Volunteer Corps of the possibility 
of their being speedily called into active service. The long threatened 
invasion was contemplated throughout the country with stem defiance, and 
the result was awaited without apprehension. Still the attempt was 
deferred, and shortly after the ruler of France, with his " Army of England," 
was called upon for the exercise of his energies in a different quarter, by 
the renewed confederacy of the Emperor of Austria with the powers of the 
North. The campaign which followed, including the capitulation of Ulm, 
the capture of Vienna, and the battle of Austerlitz, was amongst the most 
splendid ever yet achieved by the French armies in their career of victory. 
The other preparations for invasion in the ports of the dependent allies of 
France received their final discomfiture by the glorious victory of Trafalgar, 
which took place on the 21st October, 1805, the results of which were the 
annihilation of the navy of Spain and the paralyzing the efforts of the 
remaining powers hostile to Great Britain. The state of Europe, however, 
still rendered it necessary for England to maintain her attitude of defence, 
and the greatest anxiety continued for the efficiency of her domestic force. 
I find the newspapers of the day full of notices for drills, which shows 
that the Corps were always in a state of preparedness, and the convivial 
part was evidently not neglected either. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1805. ^^7 

1805. 
The Norfolk Chronicle^ August 17th, 1805, again states: — 

*Mn consequence of the following letter from Lieut-Genl. Sir James 
Pulteney, a circular has been sent by Major-Grenl. Money to the com- 
mandants of corps of yeomanry and volunteer cavalry in Norfolk and 
Suffolk, requesting them to order out their troops without loss of time, in 
marching order, for inspection. 

" Head Quarters. Colchester August 8th 1805. 
" Sir, 

" I am directed by Lieut-Genl. Sir James Pulteney, to request that you 
would apprize the volunteer corps under your orders of the possibility of 
their being called upon for service, and that you would take an early 
opportunity of inspecting each corps, in order to see that it is in readiness 
for taking the field if necessary. It is in consequence of intelligence 
recently received by his Majestys Ministers, and communicated to the 
Lieut-Genl. by his Royal Highness the Commander-in-Chief, that the above 
instructions are given. 

'' I have the honour to be 

« sir, 

" your most humble servant, 

"W. M. ARMSTRONG. 

" assistant adjutant general. 
" To Major Genl Money, etc etc.*' 



A time of anxiety followed, every day the enemy being expected ; but 
the glorious victory of Trafalgar relieved the tension, and the fears of 
invasion disappeared. After this, the existence of the Yeomanry was 
comparatively peaceful. 

I imagine the Yeomanry were in social position the best body of men 
who had ever enlisted in England since Cromwell's Ironsides, and were far 
superior to any who were under arms in Europe at the time. 

Whether they were as well mounted as the Continental Cavalry, or as 
our own regulars, it is hard to say. The Inspection Reports for 1805 
speak generally in favorable terms of the horses, even when uncom- 
plimentary to the men. Though all the men did not mount themselves, 
yet it may be safely assumed that the great majority did, and that there 
was no need in those days, even in London regiments and town squadrons. 



1 68 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 805. 



to hire horses for the purpose of teaching recruits to ride. Horses were as 
common then as bicycles are now, and whether for business or pleasure, 
their owners went from place to place on horseback rather than on wheels. 
Macadam was at this time only a re-victualling agent for the Royal Navy, 
living at Falmouth ; and though Sir D. Dundas in his memo, as to Invasion 
(dated Nov., 1796), speaks of the roads as being ''in general good," yet off 
the main lines of communication, they were often only pack-horse tracks, 
with a sound bottom indeed, but with very rough surface and very severe 
gradients. In Wiltshire, which is not a pony country, the minimum height 
for horses was 14.2 ; in Bucks it was 14 hands. The Provisional Cavalry 
Act required horses to be 14.2, but that was reduced the next month to 
14 hands. The West Riding drill-book gives 6 feet as a horse's length, 
and it is probable that in some districts a good many ponies were brought 
on parade ; but though the inspecting officers find fault with the horses in 
a good many cases as being poor and rough, complaints as to size are by 
no means common. The Provisional Cavalry Acts are careful to limit 
troop horses to geldings and mares. The later Acts speak, however, of 
"horse, mare, or gelding," as if contemplating the use of stallions in the 
ranks. If entires were often ridden at drill it must have given variety to 
the proceedings ; as would the order which legend ascribes to a well known 
Yeomanry regiment : " Dismount, stand ectsy. Milk your mares!' 

Whatever may have been the work for which the horses were best 
adapted, the men seem to have been equipped as Cavalry and Cavalry 
only; the only exception being a small number of dismounted troops, of 
which three were attached to the London and Westminster Light Horse, 
and two to the Essex Yeomanry. The following description of them is 
taken from the " Illuminated School of Mars." 

"The 7th, 8th, and 9th troops of the London and Westminster Light 
Horse Volunteers are dismounted, and act as Riflemen, carrying a rifle- 
barreled gun of new construction which will do execution at a great 
distance, and their broadswords are so contrived as to serve occasionally as 
bayonets. Cars or expedition-carriages are always ready to convey them at 
the same pace the Cavalry may march." 

The estimate for 1805 for ^he pay of the Volunteer Cavalry was 

;f8o,ooo, and for clothing on account j£4o,ooo, to which must be added 

some of the contingent allowance of j£^i30 per troop for drill instructors, &c. 

In comparison to this amount, I find that the estimate for 1905-6 was 

;f 546,800 for an establishment of 28,000. 

What did the country get for its money? As we have seen, it 
obtained a force of mounted police which in many instances paid its 
expenses handsomely by keeping the peace and protecting property from 









5 ^ 



^.n 















I 




" s 

a - 






EZ 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1805. ^69 



destruction ; and the following abstract of the Inspecting Officers' reports 
for the quarter ending 25th March, 1806, is the best answer as to the 
military value which was attached to the Yeomanry of 1805 by those who 
were responsible for the defence of the country. 

Summarising the return, it would appear that including two attached 
troops of Horse Artillery, the Yeomanry of 1805 consisted of 545 troops, 
with an establishment of nearly 33,000 of all ranks. Of them there were 
present under arms, 17,398; absent without leave, 1,999; and wanting to 
complete, 4430. Absentees are not shown except among the rank and file. 

On the efficiency of 88 troops there is no report ; several were 
prevented by bad weather from attempting to drill on the day of 
inspection ; of the remaining 457 troops, half were fit to put in the 
field, or would be with a few more days of continuous training. 157 
troops were improving, and 72 were bad. Of the last two classes a 
considerable proportion had only been raised within the last two or three 
years. 

The number of men absent without leave is discreditable to both 
officers and men. The proportion varies considerably in different districts. 
The general average, allowing for the districts in which all men absent, 
from whatever cause, are returned as "absent," must be quite \2\ percent. 
In one county, indeed, it was over 50 per cent., and this bad feature is 
quite as marked in the districts when there was a high level of efficiency 
as in the others. 

Horses, which in number were well up to the establishment, were 
**very good" in twenty-three troops, "under-sized," "poor," or **bad" in 
ninety-three, *' serviceable " or " good " in the remainder. In seven troops 
the arms were found to be in a bad state, and in eighteen the clothing. 
Both serviceable in all the rest. How far the reports were honest and 
candid it is impossible to ascertain. Some officers may not have said all 
they thought about corps commanded by persons whose political influence 
might affect their professional prospects, but there is a good deal of plain 
speaking in the reports, and on the whole I expect they are as reliable as 
similar ones furnished to Parliament would be now. If that is so, the 
country was the stronger by some 11,000 or 12,000 men trained as cavalry, 
and fit to take the field with its mounted forces, while behind these were 
7,000 or 8,000 more whom a few weeks' hard work would make efficient 

Whether the training was calculated to make the most of the material 
is another questioa Armed with sword and pistol only, the troops could 
not have been drilled on very different lines, and it is possible that the 
difficulty in obtaining arms made it impracticable to equip them other- 
wise. 



I/O 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1805. 



The Wilts Yeomaniy were promised carbines in 1801, but never 
received them, and the Fencible Cavalry only had twelve carbines per 
troop. However that may be, it can hardly be questioned that for military 
purposes the Yeomanry would have been much more valuable if they had 
been trained, as happily they are now, for dismounted duties. 

In a Parliamentary return, showing for the year 1805 the strength 
and condition of the Yeomanry Cavalry, the following is the return for the 
Eastern District, commanded by Lord Chatham : — 

44 units 

64 troops 

140 officers 

19 staff 

157 Q.M. and sergeants 

47 trumpeters 

1,770 present 

732 sick and absent with leave 

116 absent without leave 

848 total absent 

639 wanting to complete 

3,251 Establishment 

12 fit or nearly fit for service 

25 fair or improving 

7 bad 

No report on 20 troops 

5 very good 

56 good or serviceable 

3 poor, bad or undersized 

Arms in bad order in 7 troops. 



Rank and file 



Number of troops 
efficient or otherwise 



Number of troops in 
which the horses were 
good or otherwise. 
Clothing much worn in 13. 



There are no names of corps given. We will presume that some of 
the Norfolk corps came under the designation of good ; but to say the 
least of this report, it rather tends to dispel one's illusions of the efficiency 
of our Yeomanry corps. No doubt the inspecting officer praised them up 
to the skies after his inspection lunch, and then in his soberer moments he 
drew up a confidential report of quite a different complexion, and probably 
much nearer the truth. 

First or Western Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1805. 



Colonel 
Lt-Colonel 
Major 
Adjutant 



George, Marquis Townshend 
Thomas William Coke 
Sir Martin Browne Folkes, Bt. 
William Becher 



10 Dec 1803 

10 Jan 1804 

27 April 1805 

17 Feb 1804. Capt 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1805. 



171 





HOLKHAM TROOP 




Captain 


Thomas William Coke 


16 Sept 1803 


Lieut 


Eldmund Rolfe 


n f* X 


Cornet 


Robert Ward 

NORFOLK RANGERS TROOP 


1 i »• »» 


Captain 


Sir Martin B. Folkes, Bart 


29 Sept 1794 


Lieut. 


William Becher 


29 Sept 1794 


»} 


William Money Hill 


19 May 1804 


Cornet 


Nicholas John Raven 

LYNN AND FREBBRIDGB SQUADRON 


3 May 1799 


Major 


Joseph Taylor 


15 July 1803 


Captain 


John Lloyd 


»i i> (1 


tt 


Samuel Sayer 


9» n n 


Lieut 


John Etchels 


n >i tt 


» 


John Lancaster 


3 Feb 1804 


Comet 


William Crisp 


f» » •> 


»» 


Thomas Jackson 

RIFLEMEN 


>> »f t} 


Captain 


George Bailey 


I July 1805 


)* 


Samuel Rudall 


f> i» »» 


1st Lieut 


Richard Marshall 


»» •> n 


yt 


William Cox 


II ti II 


2nd Lieut. 


Daniel Brown 

ARTILLERY 


II II II 


Lieut 


Henry Crow 

SMITHDON AND BROTHERCROSS TROOP 


II 11 II 


Captain 


William Hoste 


13 Aug 1803 


Lieut 


Gwynne Etheridge 


13 Nov 1803 


Comet 


John Oakes 

SWAFFHAM TROOP 


11 >i If 


Captain 


Richard Johnson 


12 Nov 1803 


Lieut 


Lawrence William Stevens 


II Oct 1803 


Cornet 


Thomas Bullock 

TWYFORD TROOP 


22 June 1798 


Capt. com* 


Coulsey Savory 


31 Jan 1804 


Captain 


John Pike 


II If V* 


Lieut 


John Andrews Girling 


II II II 


Cornet 


John Bird 


II II II 



172 



The Records of the Yeomanry CavcUry of Nor/olky 1805. 



Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1805. 


Colonel com* 


William Earle Bulwer 


22 Jan 1805 


Lt.-Colonel 


Hamond Alpe 


7 Jan 1804 


Major 


John Hyde 


ft f» n 


Adjutant 


James Murray 

CLACKCLOSE TROOP 


>( »f »» 


Captain 


William Lee 


5 Sept 1803 


IJeut. 


Hugh Wool! 


It tt tt 


Cornet 


James Lee 

DEREHAM TROOP 


»l >t w 


Captain 


John Crisp 


22 June 1798 


Lieut 


William Catton 


27 April 1805 


Comet 


John Crisp, jun. 

BAST DEREHAM TROOP 


ft ff >f 


Captain 


John Hyde 


29 Oct 1802 


Lieut 


John Potter Hamilton 


29 Oct 1802 


Cornet 


Samuel King 

ERPINGHAM AND BYNBSFORD TROOP 


ID Dec 1803 


Captain 


William Earle Bulwer 


16 March 1797 


Lieut 


John Holley 


>« ft ft 


Cornet 


George Wymer 

SOUTH GREENHOE TROOP 


ft ft ft 


Captain 


Robert Wilson 


23 July 1803 


Lieut 


Thomas Harvey 


» »f t» 


Cornet 


Edward Vincent Eyre 

HINGHAM TROOP 


4 Dec 1804 


Captain 


Hamond Alpe 


8 Aug 1798 


Lieut. 


James Murray 


28 Dec 1796 


Cornet 


Edward Case Gilman 


6 March 1805 



Third or Eastern Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry ; 1805. 

10 Dec 1803 

14 Jan 1804 

7 Jan 1804 

14 March 1804 



Colonel 


John Money 


Lt-Colonel 


John Smyth 


Major 


Charles Laton 


Adjutant 


Roger Hayes 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 805. 



^73 





P10NBBR8 




Captain 


Crisp Brown 


18 June 1804 


1st Lieut 


Daniel Bloom 


It }) It 


2nd Lieat. 


William Heath 

DISMOUNTED SHARPSHOOTERS 


If II II 


Captain 
» 


David Betson 
William Cooch Pillans 




20 July 1804 


1st Lieut. 


Henry Harmer 


7 Aug 1804 


»> 


Samuel Brown 

BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSHAM TROOP 


24 May 1805 


Captain 


William Heath 


10 Jan 1804 


Lieut 


John Sibell 


*i fi 1* 


Cornet 


William Jary 

LODDON AND CLAVBRING TROOP 


II II II 


Capt & Lt-Col. 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


II II •> 


Cornet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 

TUNSTBAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


>i II II 


Capt & Major 


Charles Laton 


17 April 179s 


Lieut 


Daniel Scott 


13 April 1805 


Cornet 


Edward Morse 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE SQUADRON 


II II II 


Major 


John Harvey 


23 July 1803 


Captain 


Roger Hayes 


27 Aug 1803 


n 


Anthony Hudson 


,24 Feb 1804 


Lieut 


Samuel Mitchell 


24 Dec 1803 


n 


Charles Tompson 


24 Feb 1804 


Cornet 


John Kerrison 


12 Nov 1803 


n 


Edward Tompson 


20 June 1805 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Forster 


24 Dec 1803 


Surgeon 


Edward Colman 

WYMONDHAM TROOP 


i> II II 


Captain 


Hon. William Wodehouse 


5 Sept 1803 


Lieut 


John Darell 


II II II 


Cornet 


John Smith Wigg 


II » II 



174 ^^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1805-6. 



YARMOUTH TROOP 

Captain Edmund Knowles Lacon 25 June 1803 

Lieut. Samuel Tolver 20 July 1805 

Cornet Mark Waters „ „ „ 

Chaplain Rev. Samuel Lovick Cooper 6 Dec 1803 

Surgeon William Taylor 



99 M If 



1806. 

Extending as the Voluntary Associations did over many years, the 
number of gentlemen who held commissions was very great, and though 
jealousies were exhibited, on the whole there was manifestly general cordiality 
throughout the county, and several names might be quoted as efficient and 
able commanders of corps. The Lord-Lieutenant himself, Marquis 
Townshend, was an experienced and judicious officer, and his interest in the 
work of the Associations was continuous and encouraging. Colonel Bulwer, 
Major-Greneral Money, Major John Harvey, were among the most prominent, 
popular, and zealous. 

But of Major-General Money, who resided at Crown Point, it must be said 
he merits much more than passing notice. He was a remarkable man, and a 
very able officer. He was one of the first who ascended in a balloon, making 
the ascent from Norwich on the 23rd July, 1785, was carried over to the sea, 
where he descended, and was picked up by a revenue cutter eighteen miles 
from Southwold, and reached Lowestoft the next day. He resided at Crown 
Point near Norwich, and farmed three hundred to four hundred acres. As a 
soldier he had seen nearly forty years' service when these Voluntary 
Associations were formed. He was in the short war in Brabant in 1790. In 
1 79 1 he was in Paris and received overtures to serve in the French army, which 
he at that time refused, but accepted in 1792 a commission in the Royalist army 
with the rank of General. He was in the war of Hanover with Elliott's Light 
Dragoons, and the Prussian Hussars in Westphalia during the German war. 
He went to Germany and returned with the Marquis Townshend. In America 
he was Quarter-Master-General to General Burgoyne. 

FIRST OR Western Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1806. 

No return. 

Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : i8o6. 

No return, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 806. 



175 



Third or Eastern 


Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1806 


Colonel 


John Money 


10 Dec 1803 


Lt-Colonel 


John Smyth 


14 Jan 1804 


Major 


Charles I^ton 


7 Jan 1804 


II 


John Harvey 


23 July 1803 


Adjutant 


Roger Hayes 

BLOFIELD TROOP 


14 March 1804 


Captain 


William Heath 


10 Jan 1804 


Lieut. 


John Sibell 


11 II n 


Cornet 


William Jary 


n •• II 


Qr. Master 


George Baker 




59 rank and file 








TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 




Capt and Major 


Charles Laton 


7 Jan 1804 


Lieut 


Daniel Scott 


13 April 1805 


Comet 


Edward Morse 


>• If II 


Qr. Master 


John I kin 




47 rank and file 







LOOOON AND CLAVERING TROOP 

Capt. and Lt.-col. John Smyth 

Lieut William Carpenter 

Comet Thomas Alday Kerrison 

Qr. Master Robert Bunfellow 
5 1 rank and file 



9 Dec 1794 



»i II 



II >} 



II 



If 



NORWICH LIGHT HORSE SQUADRON 



Major 


John Harvey 


Captain 


Roger Hayes 


II 


Anthony Hudson 


Lieut. 


Samuel Mitchell 


II 


Charles Tompson 


Comet 


John Kerrison 


II 


Edward Tompson 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Forster D D. 


Surgeon 


Edward Col man 


69 rank and file 





23 July 
27 Aug 

24 Feb 
24 Dec 
24 Feb 
12 Nov 

20 June 
24 Dec 



1803 
1803 
1804 
1803 
1804 
1803 
1805 
1803 



II 



II 



II 



176 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1806-7 





WYMONDHAM TROOP 






Captain 


Hon. William Wodehouse 


5 Sept 


1803 


Lieut 


John Darell 


» »> 


»> 


Comet 


John Cann 


M M 


u 


Qr. Master 


Benjamin Redhead 






37 rank and file 


YARMOUTH TROOP 






Captain 


Edmund Knowles Lacon 


25 June 


1803 


Lieut 


Samuel Tolver 


20 July 


1805 


Cornet 


Mark Waters 


ti If 


» 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Lovick Cooper 


6 Dec 


1803 


Surgeon 


William Taylor 


>» »( 


>t 


49 rank and file 









Total for regiment 28 officers 

316 rank and file 
There is no return this year for the Pioneers and Sharpshooters, but they 
appear the following year. 



1807. 
In 1807 the energies of Buonaparte found ample field for exertion, first in 
the sanguinary conflicts which took place with the armies of Russia and 
Prussia, and afterwards in the diplomatic discussions which ensued. His 
hostility against England was not however, relaxed, either by distance, or by 
contention with other powers. After an abortive attempt to put her off her 
guard by an insidious proposal for negociation, he openly proclaimed his 
intention of compelling her to abandon the whole of her maritime conquests, 
before he would depart from his system of Continental aggrandizement 
The menaces of the French ruler, on this as on former occasions, had the 
effect of uniting all parties in England in the opinion that the honour and 
independence of the country could be preserved only by maintaining its naval 
and military establishments in a full state of preparation, either for defence or 
attack, in all parts of the world. The proceedings in Parliament were 
principally directed to a discussion of the best means of regulating and 
supporting the various descriptions of military force in the country; and in 
these debates, Mr. Windham, then Secretary of State for the War Department, 
although not friendly to the Volunteer system as applied to the general arming 
of the population, yet expressed an opinion in favour of such corps, as were 
composed of men whose station in life and pecuniary means enabled them to 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1807. 



177 



give their free and unpaid services to the country. The numbers of the then 
existing Volunteer force he stated as amounting to above 350,000. 

In December of this year, a telegraph or signal station was erected upon 
the hills leading from Norwich to Thorpe. It was commanded by a naval 
officer, and the object of it was to open and maintain a prompt communication 
with Yarmouth on the one side, and with the telegraphs between Norwich and 
London on the other. Messages were sent from the Admiralty to Yarmouth in 
17 minutes. The chain of communication was by Strumpshaw, Thorpe Hills, 
Honingham, Carlton, and Harling, and thence by way of Thetford and Bury 
St Edmund's, across Newmarket Heath, to London. 



First or Western Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry: 1807. 


Colonel 


George, Marquis Townshend 


10 Dec 1803 


Lt-Colonel 


Thomas William Coke 


10 Jan 1804 


Major 


Sir Martin Browne Folkes, Bt. 


27 April 1805 


Adjutant Capt. 


William Becher 

NORFOLK RANGERS 


17 Feb 1804 


Major 


George, Marquis Townshend 


29 Sept 1794 


Captain 


Sir Martin Browne Folkes, Bt. 


M » yi 


Lieut. 


William Becher 


91 f> >l 


n 


William Money Hill 


19 May 1804 


Cornet 


Nicholas John Raven 


3 May 1799 


i> 


Frederick Hare 

SMITHDON AND BROTHERCROSS TROOP 


17 March 1806 


Captain 


William Hoste 


13 Aug 1803 


Lieut 


G^ynne Etheridge 


13 Nov 1803 


Cornet 


John Oakes 

SWAFFHAM TROOP 


19 M y> 


Captain 


Richard Johnson 


12 Nov 1803 


Lieut 


Lawrence William Stevens 


n Oct 1803 


Cornet 


Thomas Bullock 


22 June 1798 



Second OR Midland Regiment OF Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1807. 

Colonel William Earle Bulwer 22 Jan 1805 

Lt.-Colonel Hamond Alpe 7 Jan 1804 

Major John Hyde 

Adjutant James Murray 



9> n 



178 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1807. 





CLACKCLO8E TROOP 


• 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


William Lee 
Hugh WooU 
James Lee 

DEREHAM TROOP 


5 Sept 1803 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


John Crisp 
William Catton 
John Crisp, jun. 

BAST DEREHAM TROOP 


22 June 1798 
27 April 1805 

•» » •> 


Captain 

Lieut. 

Comet 


John Hyde 

John Potter Hamilton 

Samuel King 

ERPINGHAM AND EYNBSFORD TROOP 


29 Oct 1802 

}» M » 

ID Dec 1803 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


William Earle Bulwer 
John HoUey 
George Wymer 

SOUTH GREENHOB TROOP 


16 March 1797 

f» n >i 

)f M (» 


Captain 

Lieut. 

Comet 


Robert Wilson 
Thomas Harvey 
Edward Vincent Eyre 

HINGHAM TROOP 


23 July 1803 

t» U l> 

4 Dec 1804 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 


Hamond Alpe 
James Murray 
Edward Case Gilman 


8 Aug 1798 

28 Dec 1796 

6 March 1805 



Third or Eastern Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalr/ : 1807 



Colonel 


John Money 


10 Dec 1803 


Lt-Colonel 


John Smyth 


14 Jan 1804 


Major 


Charles Laton 


7 Jan 1804 


11 


John Harvey 


23 July 1803 


Adjutant 


Roger Hayes 

PIONEERS 


14 March 1804 


Captain 


Crisp Brown 


18 June i8at 


1st Lieut 


Daniel Bloom 


» >i If 


2nd Lieut. 


William Heath 


*( SI II 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 807. 



179 





DISMOUNTED SHARPSHOOTERS 




Captain 


William Cooch Pillans 


20 July 1R04 


1st Lieut. 


Henry Harmer 


7 Aug 1804 


»i 


Samuel Brown 

BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSH AM TROOP 


24 May 1805 


Captain 


William Heath 


10 Jan 1804 


Lieut 


John Sibell 


>i >» }> 


Cornet 


William Jary 

LODDON AND CLAVERING TROOP 


f) n ly 


Capt and Lt-Col. 


John Smyth 


9 Dec 1794 


Lieut 


William Carpenter 


» y> i» 


Cornet 


Thomas Alday Kerrison 

• 

NORWICH LIGHT HORSE SQUADRON 


II ft »» 


Major 


John Harvey 


23 July 1803 


Captain 


Roger Hayes 


27 Aug 1803 


>» 


Anthony Hudson 


24 Feb 1804 


Lieut 


Samuel Mitchell 


24 Dec 1804 


n 


Charles Tompson 


24 Feb 1804 


Cornet 


John Kerrison 


12 Nov 1803 


n 


Edward Tompson 


20 June 1805 


Chaplain 


Rev Samuel Forster, D.D. 


24 Dec 1803 


Surgeon 


Edward Colman 

TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 


II 9» n 


Capt & Major 


Charles Laton 


17 April 1795 


Lieut 


Daniel Scott 


13 April 1805 


Comet 


Edward Morse 

WYMONDHAM TROOP 


IS II 11 


Captain 


John Darell 


25 July 1806 


Lieut 






Cornet 


John Smith Wigg 

YARMOUTH TROOP 


5 Sept 1803 


Captain 


Edmund Knowles Lacon 


25 June 1803 


Lieut 


Samuel Tolver 


20 July 1805 


Cornet 


Mark Waters 


II 91 II 


Chaplain 


Rev. Samuel Lovick Cooper 


6 Dec 1803 


Surgeon 


\Villiam Taylor 


11 >i II 



i8o The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1807-8. 



Lt-Col. 

Major 

Lieut 



i» 



Cornet 



Captain 



>i 



1st Lieut. 



>» 



>i 



2nd Lieut 



II 



II 



II 



An Independent Corps. 



LYNN AND FRBEBRIDGE CAVALRY 



Lieut 



Joseph Taylor 
John Lloyd 
John Elches 
John Lancaster 
William Crisp 

SHARPSHOOTERS 

George Bailey 
Samuel Rudall 
John Gross Herring 
Richard Marshall 
William Cox 
Thomas Foster 
Daniel Brown 
Robert Cotton 
John Hall 

ARTILLERY 

Henry Crowe 



II Oct 


1 80s 


28 Jan 


1806 


15 July 


1803 


3 Feb 


1804 


1* n 


»• 


I July 


1805 


II II 


i« 


16 Dec 


It 


I July 


1805 


II II 


If 


27 Jan 


1806 


I July 


1 80s 


16 Dec 


II 


27 Jan 


1806 


I July 


1805 



1808. 

In the year 1808 there was nothing in the state of political affairs 
either abroad or at home to call for any peculiar exertions on the part 
of the domestic armed force in England ; the war in the North of 
Europe had been closed by the Treaty of Tilsit, and Bonaparte was left 
at liberty to direct that unparalleled course of treacherous diplomacy 
and open military aggression by which he succeeded in overrunning the 
kingdom of Spain, and in temporarily rendering that ancient monarchy 
dependent on his own Empire, by placing its usurped crown on the 
head of his brother. The people of the Peninsula were not, however, to 
be subdued as easily as their ancient and worn-out governments. A 
popular resistance was soon organized, both in Spain and Portugal, which 
immediately attracted the sympathy and ensured the co-operation of Great 
Britain. An expedition which sailed from Cork early in the summer 
under Sir Arthur Wellesley, destined to co-operate with the patriots in 
the North of Spain, found it expedient, on arriving off the coast, to 
direct its first operations to the liberation of Portugal, then in the 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 808. 1 8 1 



occupation of a French army. It was on the march of this small army 
towards Lisbon that the victories of Roli^a and Vimeiro were gained, 
which will be ever memorable, as being the first in that series of 
achievements which subsequently shed such a glory on the British 
armies and their illustrious commander. 

Although the Yeomanry Cavalry were not called upon for service 
in this year, they persevered in their course of training and exercise. 



In October of this year there is mention of a silver cup being 
presented at Blickling races, for the first time, for competition by horses 
ridden in a regiment or troop of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. 

It is evident, too, that the rank and file were not unmindful of 
the services which some of their officers performed for them ; as we 
find the Wymondham troop presenting a valuable sword to their 
commanding officer. Captain John Darell, in November, 1808. The 
following is the account, as related in the Norfolk Chronicle^ December 
3rd, 1808: — 

"Thursday sennight the Wymondham Yeomanry Cavalry, had a field 
day on Ashwellthorpe common, and having performed their usual exercise, 
returned to Wymondham market place to present their Captain, John 
Darell Esqr, with a most elegant and valuable sword. The Lieut having 
been requested by the troop to present it, he said, 

" Capt. Darell, the Wymondham Yeomanry Cavalry have deputed me, 
their Lieut, to address you on this occasion. I approach you sir, to 
express, the high opinion we entertain of you as an officer commanding 
us ; considering ourselves much indebted to you for that constant and 
strict attention on the days of exercise, which has caused our discipline 
to obtain the approbation of the superior officers of the regiment, the 
inspecting officer, and that also of his Majestys Lieut of the county. 
On every occasion sir, where our services have been required, your 
conduct has been greatly commended, and your gentlemanly behaviour 
towards us, individually and collectively highly applauded. As a proof 
of this assertion, we entreat you to receive a token of respect, that 
future time may record this testimony of our sincere regard. Sir, it is 
this sword ; and on offering it to you, I know no words more appropriate 
to express our intention than these which are inscribed on it. 

'"Presented by the Wymondham Yeomanry Cavalry as a memorial of 
their attachment and esteem to John Darell Esq, their Captain.'" 

The usual complimentary speeches followed, which it is not necessary 
to give here, and then it goes on to say, "the troop immediatly fired 



1 82 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 808-10. 



three vollies, and at the Kings Head in Wymondham partook of an 
excellent dinner; after which many loyal and patriotic toasts were 
drunk ; many favourite songs and glees were sung, adding to the hilarity 
which prevailed; and although the company assembled did not depart 
till an early hour, that conduct which ever distinguished the soldier and 
gentleman, maintained uninterrupted the most perfect harmony." 



1809. 

The leading events of 1809 were of a varied character ; the disastrous 
retreat of Corunna, and the fatal expedition to Walcheren, were counter- 
balanced by the continued successes of our arms in Portugal and by the 
victory of Talavera. During this year the Norfolk Yeomanry were not 
called upon for any public duty ; they continued, however, the prescribed 
routine of training and exercise. 

The yeoman of this time was evidently a good sportsman, as I find 
an account for February 28th, in the Norfolk Chronicle^ which thus describes 
a sporting event which occurred :-«- 

" The Norwich Squadron of Light Horse Volunteers had just concluded 
their drill on Mulbarton Common, when Capt Darell's hounds drove a stag 
across the parade ground. The Volunteers at once joined in the chase, 'to 
which it will be readily conceived their numbers and appearance gave a 
great eclat' The stag was taken alive in a shed at Mangreen, after a run 
of 3 hours ID minutes/' 



1810. 

On February 24th^ 18 10, the Norfolk Chronicle informs us "That the 
Dereham troop, presented their Captain J. Crisp sen. Esq with a silver cup 
bearing this inscription — This cup was presented by the East Dereham 
troop of volunteer cavalry, on the 14th of February 18 10 to Captain Crisp, 
as a mark of their respect for his conduct during the 12 years he has 
commanded them. 

" Upon this occasion a deputation was appointed to present the cup, 
which deputation was the committee of five, who have always had the 
power of regulating the troop. Mr. Chambers of Shipdham, was the person 
selected by the committee to present the cup. 

"The captain in reply said, 

'' He highly esteemed the honour done him, and after giving a short 
history of the troop, particularly thanked them for the unanimity which had 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 10-13. 183 



prevailed amongst them, and said he should remember the kindness shewn 
him upon this occasion, and value the present made him, with heartfelt 
recollections, to the last hour of his existence." 



About this time, also, E. K. Lacon, Esq., commanding the Yarmouth 
Yeomanry, gave a silver cup to be competed for by members of that corps 
riding their own horses. This was the first regular race meeting held at 
Yarmouth. 

This year (1810) Greneral Money made an offer to the Commander-in- 
Chief to raise four hundred rough hussars mounted on Welsh horses, by 
men below the army standard, to be embarked in four months. The object 
of this corps was to relieve the fine regiments of Cavalry in the Peninsula 
from all the harassing duties of the camp. 

1812. 

The year 181 2, like that which preceded it, was fruitful in triumphs to 
the British armies in the Peninsula ; and was still more remarkable for 
the decisive change in the course of events on the continent of Europe 
that led to a successful termination of the struggle which the ancient 
governments had, through the perseverance and support of England, been 
enabled to maintain against the gigantic power and overweening ambition 
of France. The victories of Barrosa and Albuera, and the capture of 
Badajos and Ciudad Rodrigo, afforded continued proof that the armies of 
England and their commanders were capable of coping with the best 
of those in France; and in the same year the presumptuous and 
extravagant expedition for the conquest of Russia, and the calamitous results 
with which it was attended, occasioned the downfall of that portentous 
power which had so long domineered over the continent of Europe. 

Our domestic annals were marked by calamitous and extensive 
commotions in the manufacturing districts. 

1813. 
The year 18 13 is chiefly remarkable for those events which immediately 
preceded the downfall of the French Empire, and which continued, in an 
accelerated progress, that course of disaster to the armies of Bonaparte 
which had commenced in the preceding year. Those legions, which had so 
lately dictated as conquerors to every state on the Continent, were now 
seen both on the northern and southern extremities of Europe in full 
retreat to their own frontiers. Although the return of Napoleon in the 
spring, to his army in the north, had given a momentary check to the 



184 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 181 3. 



advance of the Russians, he was unable to withstand the combination of 
those powers whom he had but recently compelled to be his allies, and 
the overwhelming force brought against him at Leipsic, after a succession of 
other sanguinary conflicts, compelled him, with the shattered remains of his 
once formidable host, to a precipitate retreat across the Rhine. At the 
same time the southern frontier of France was equally the scene of dis- 
comfiture to her armies; after completing his victorious career in the 
Peninsula, by the crowning triumph of Vittoria, our illustrious commander 
had the satisfaction of driving whatever remained of the French armies 
across the Pyrenean frontier, and of establishing his own winter quarters 
within the territories of France. 

The internal tranquillity of England had been uninterrupted throughout 
the year, but the efforts she was called upon to sustain, in nearly every 
quarter of the globe, were attended with an exhausting drain upon her 
resources, both naval and military. In addition to the continued demands 
for the support of her armaments in Europe and in her colonies, she had to 
maintain a calamitous warfare, both by sea and land, with the United 
States of America. Under these circumstances, the Government felt itself 
called upon to place the domestic force of the country on the most efficient 
footing; with these views the following letter, dated the 26th November, 
18 1 3, was addressed to the commanding officers of yeomanry regiments by 
Lord Sidmouth, Secretary of State for the Home Department 

Sir, 

as the important measures which are about to be carried into 
effect for the purpose of augmenting the disposable force of the country, 
will probably cause a considerable reduction of that part of our military 
force which has been, hitherto, appropriated to home service, it becomes 
highly desirable, that the distinguished corps under your command, should 
be in a state to render the most effectual assistance in support of the civil 
power, in case of emergency. I think it, therefore, my duty to call your 
immediate and particular attention to this subject, and I feel confident, 
that the same zeal and spirit which have been invariably manifested by 
the individuals of which the Yeomanry corps are composed, will induce 
them to meet the wishes of His Majesty's government at the present 
important conjuncture ; and I have to request that you will take an early 
opportunity of conferring with your officers on the subject. To your and 
their judgment and discretion, I confide the adoption of such measures as 
may be best calculated to effect the object in view. You will be pleased 
to transmit to me, with as little delay as possible, a return, showing the 
present effective strength of the regiment, and in case it should not be 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1813. 185 



complete to its establishment I beg leave to impress upon you the importance 
of taking the most efTectual steps for that purpose. 

I have the honor to be etc 

SIDMOUTH. 



1813. 
Wellington's victory at Vittoria, on the 21st June, 18 13, his defeat 
of Marshal Soult a few weeks later, and the rout of Bonaparte, near 
Leipsic, in the month of October, were events which gave rise to the 
greatest enthusiasm among the loyal inhabitants of every town and 
village in the Kingdom. On Monday, November 15 th, the citizens of 
Norwich celebrated the successes of the allied armies by a most remarkable 
demonstration. The sum of ;£^I50 was subscribed for the purchase of 
beef, beer, and bread, to be distributed among the populace, and on the 
Sunday, a bullock, weighing about forty stones, was slaughtered by a 
Mr. Lowden, and preparations made for roasting it whole. At nine o'clock 
that evening, the carcase was slung upon a huge jack, in front of a 
brick-built stove, of semi-circular form, erected in the Market Place. All 
night long, and throughout the following morning, the roasting and 
basting continued, and at the same time barriers were erected and other 
arrangements made for the orderly distribution of the viands. The 
eventful day was ushered in by the ringing of bells and the hoisting of 
flags, and from an early hour all the streets were densely thronged by 
holiday-makers. At noon, a grand procession, which had been marshalled 
on the Castle Meadow, moved towards the Market Place. It was headed 
by a band of music, and by many gentlemen on horseback, and then 
came the members of the various Constitutional societies, with their flags 
and banners, drums and fifes, and bugle horns. A flag-staff, surmounted 
by the Royal Standard and the Union Jack, with the French flag flying 
below, was everywhere hailed with hearty cheering, but the loudest 
greeting was reserved for ''a triumphant canopy, borne on men's shoulders, 
with a life-sized figure thereon, representing Field Marshal, the Marquis 
of Wellington, in full uniform, decorated with laurels." At his feet were 
the tattered French colours, and behind him flowers were strewn. The 
procession — the rear of which was brought up by another mounted party 
— perambulated the lilarket Place, amid the cheers of the spectators, and 
at one o'clock a general move was made to the centre of the square to 
witness the cutting up of the bullock Whether this remnant of a 
barbarous age had awakened within the breasts of the populace feelings 
that had long been dormant, or whether the music, marching, and 



1 86 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1813, 



excitement of the morning had unduly sharpened their appetites, we know 
not, but it is recorded that as soon as Mr. Lowden essayed to apportion 
the carcase, the crowd broke through the barriers, scrambled for the bread 
and meat, and made an attack upon the ten barrels of brown stout 
provided for their refreshment. The assistants were unable to withstand 
the onslaught, and, consequently, a scene of the wildest confusion ensued 
and the greater part of the provisions was absolutely wasted The 
remainder of the afternoon was devoted to the building of a huge bonfire. 
For this purpose, several loads of faggot- wood, tar barrels* crates, and 
other combustible materials were heaped around a large fir-tree, and at 
six o'clock, when the pile was lighted, "a grand column of flame shot 
up, which was seen for many miles around" At about the same hour 
a procession started from St Giles' gates, and marched to the Market 
Place. Leading the way was a party of the Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers, followed by the Ipswich mail coach, drawn by four handsome 
greys, driven by Mr. Coldwell, the proprietor. ** It was decorated with 
laurel and rows of lamps on the roof, the coachman and guard in their 
livery behind; the inside of the coach lighted up, and transparent 
inscriptions in the windows. On one side, 'The downfall of the tyrant,' 
' Continental alliance,' and ' Leipsic ; * on the other, ' England ' by her 
firmness, has saved herself, and her example has saved the rest of 
Europe." After another party of horsemen, came *^a transparent pyramid 
on a car, in front of which rode two artillerymen, supporting a veteran 
wounded Chelsea prisoner, before a whole leng^ portrait of Lord 
Wellington, surmounted with the names of those places in Portugal and 
Spain which had submitted to his arms ; and, right and left* the 
Emperors of Germany and Austria, and the Crown Prince of Sweden." 
The members of the Constitutional Clubs, accompanied by a band, 
preceded ''a carriage with a platform, on which was a large figure in 
full-dress uniform, in his hand a label with the words, ' My exaltation 
ends in my disgrace.' On each side of the carriage, which was drawn 
by men, rode two persons on horseback, correctly dressed in the costume 
of Cossacks, who occasionally used their spears to turn the figure round, 
which moved on a pivot On reaching the Market Place, the effigy of 
Bonaparte was consigned to the flames, amid the shouts of an immense 
multitude. 

The Yeomanry still continued to perform their ordinary routine of 
drills and exercises, and the newspapers of the day are full of notices 
to the members to attend at their various drill centres. 

The Wymondham troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by Capt. 
Darell, brought themselves into unpleasant notoriety in the month of June, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1813. 187 



1813, by an incident which gave rise to unusual excitement, and called 

for searching investigation on the part of the authorities. It appeared 

that at about eleven o'clock on the night of the 4th June, the peaceable 

inhabitants of the town were awakened by the discharge of firearms in 

the street. Among those who hastily descended from their bedrooms to 

see what was taking place was a Mr. Morris. According to his statement, 

a number of yeomen galloped up the street, when one of them reined up, 

and deliberately fired at the upper window of a house, while another 

wheeled his horse round at about forty yards distant from the place where 

he (Morris) was standing, and discharged his pistol at him. Instantaneously 

with the flash of the weapon, Mr. Morris received a ball in his breast, 

which penetrated his coat, waistcoat, and shirt, and fractured one of his 

ribs. The occurrence was reported to the commanding officer, who inserted 

the following notice in the Norfolk Chronicle: — '* Capt. Darell having 

received information of a most disgraceful outrage said to have been 

committed by some of the troop, on the 4th of this month, feels it necessary 

to order, in the strongest manner that he is empowered to do, that the 

Wymondham troop of Yeomanry Cavalry will meet in Wymondham, on 

Wednesday next, the i6th inst Anyone absenting himself without giving 

such reasons as are satisfactory to the whole troop will be dismissed from 

that date." The investigation was duly held on the day named, and on 

the 17th June, Capt Darell announced through our columns, that after 

a most strict and indefatigable scrutiny it appeared, on the best possible 

evidence, '^that no pistol loaded with ball had been fired by any man of 

the troop, and that the pistols discharged were in an elevated direction. 

Therefore, carrying the supposition to the utmost extent that circumstances 

admit in respect of the troop, it can be considered but as one of those 

too-frequent accidents which human foresight is not always able to guard 

against, or reflection to account for." Mr. Morris, however, did not allow 

the matter to rest, and on the 19th June, published his own view of the 

case. One man of the troop, he stated, acknowledged at the enquiry that 

he had brought ball cartridges on parade, and had given them to others ; 

and a certain number confessed to having fired their pistols in the town. 

Having in his possession the ball by which he was wounded, Mr. Morris 

compared it with one handed him by Capt. Darell, and found that both 

corresponded exactly in size and weight The troopers alleged that had 

it been fired from one of their pistols at so short a distance the ball 

would have passed through him ; but Mr. Morris replied, *' that the man, 

particularly if he were intoxicated, might have spilled the greater part of 

the charge in priming, or merely slipped the cartridge in without ramming 

it down, which would, of course, have reduced the force of the ball." 



1 88 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1813. 

Unfortunately, for Mr. Morris, the evidence of the whole troop was dead 
against him, and neither the production of the bullet, nor the fact that his 
rib was broken, afforded, in the opinion of the authorities, sufficient ground 
for further action. 

The following satire was written after this unfortunate incident The 
pamphlet can be found in the Free Library, at Norwich, and, being rather 
lengthy, I have selected a few verses only as an example. It is simply 
a satire, and possess no literary merit. 

THE 

W X X X X X X TROOP I ! ! 

OR 

FOURTH OF JUNE. 

A SATIRE, 

BY 

WHO DO YOU THINK? 



*' Ambition, not Honour, actuates that breast 
Which seeks promotion gain'd by Interest." 



ATTLEBURGH : 

Printed by R Parson, and Sold by all Booksellers. 

1813. 

THE 
W X X X X X X TROOP. 

There was a troop. 

A motley group 
Of country Toms and Johneys too, 

A scurvy set 

As ever met 
To celebrate or to review. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 1 3. 1 89 



They met one day 

In grand array. 
It was upon the fourth of June, 

To celebrate 

The day they met, 
And rang'd 'em to the bugle's tune. 

The bugle blew 

Each hero drew 
His charger in to form the line. 

And I am sure 

There ne'er before 
Were warriors who look'd so fine : 



If 



" Why, John, d'ye hear. 

You spur'd my mare," 
" No, damme, that I'm sure I didn't, 

" You lie, for Zur 

I saw your spur 
As you were turning, running in't." 



But now again 

These loyal men 
Drew up to fire a grand salute, 

I've said it now. 

For you must know 
'Twas grand. Sir, with a witness to it. 

'Twas pop, pop, pop ! 

Some cry'd out " Stop 
I cannot to my holsters get ; 

I've lost my prime, 

Wha give us time, 
For, hang it, I an't ready yet." 



« 



But drilling done 

They'd better fun, 
By far more pleasant exercise, 

The soldiers thought 

'Twas famous sport. 
Cutting, slashing, joints and pies. 



1 90 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 8 1 3, 



Around the board 

With dainties 8tor*d 
At dinner now these Yeomen sat ; 

I think they were 

With such good fare 
Better train'd by far for that 

For there were some 

Who when at home 
Saw seldom such a welcome sight, 

They thought they would 

On what was good 
Now feast their stinted appetite. 

One in his haste 

Made shocking waste 
By spilling soup and gravey too, 

MHiich fell upon 

His brother John 
And spoil'd his soldiering breeches new. 



*' Go, Waiter, bring 

A leg and wing, 
Make haste, make haste, Tm hungry, run. 

You dog, d'ye see, 

Go, get it me. 
Why look, the goose is almost done." 



The table clear*d. 

The wine appeared, 
With General Port a war they wag*d ; 

*Gainst many a round 

They stood their ground. 
And soldier like they all engag'd. 



The bottle past 

The circle fast, 
And many a loyal toast they drank, 

They nobly charg'd 

With bumpers large 
They had no rear, no backward rank. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 14- 15. 191 



1814. 

The commencement of 18 14 witnessed the triumphant march of the 
confederated armies of Russia and Germany across the Rhine, which was 
soon followed by their advance into the heart of France ; at the same 
time the British armies, in the southern provinces of that country, were 
led by their Chief, in an equally successful career. The victory of Orthes 
and the capture of Toulouse prepared the way for the occupation of Paris 
by the Allies, the abdication of the Empire by Napoleon, and his con- 
sequent retreat to the island of Elba. In the course of the same year the 
unfortunate war with America was also brought to a close. After having 
occupied for so many years so prominent a place among the belligerents 
of Europe, Great Britain found herself in a still prouder situation, as the 
leading arbiter for the arrangements of the peaceful relations of the various 
states whose independence she had been so instrumental in establishing. 
The exertions which at the close of the preceding year had been called 
for by the Government, with a view to the support and increase of our 
domestic force, had been conspicuous throughout the Kingdom. 

The great political events which now followed each other in rapid 
succession changed the whole face of affairs, and the only call made on 
the domestic force of the country was to join the joyful demonstrations 
and ceremonies which ensued. On the 20th of April, the King of France, 
Louis XVI 1 1., was called from that retreat which the hospitality of this 
country had provided for him, and made his solemn entry into Liondon, 
on his way to resume the crown of his ancestors, when the restored 
monarch received the personal congratulations of the Prince Regent of 
England, and of the principal Ministers of State. 

In December of this year, a riot was occasioned at King's Lynn by 
sailors, who, with a number of other persons, forcibly took a portion of the 
crew from a vessel about to sail, and demanded a general rise of wages. 
The Brunswick Hussars of the King's German Legion, from Norwich, and 
the Lynn and Freebridge Yeomanry speedily put an end to the tumult, 
and three of the rioters were taken to Norwich Castle under cavalry 
escort At the Norfolk Assizes, held at Norwich in July, 181 5, the 
offenders were sentenced to two months imprisonment 

In April, 1 8 14, the number of the Norfolk Yeomanry was 812, but 
there are no returns of officers who composed the force. 



1815. 
The year 1815 is memorable for the sudden re-appearance, on the 
1st of March, of Bonaparte on the shores of France ; his unobstructed 



192 714^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1815. 



march to Paris, and his resumption of the imperial dignity, with the 
stirring events of the Government of one hundred days, must ever form 
the most remarkable period in the history of modern times. The armies 
of the allied powers had evacuated the territories of France; the early 
occurrence, however, of his landing, gave time to countermand the orders 
of their homeward march, and in the month of May, a powerful army 
consisting of the- combined troops of Great Britain, Prussia, and Belgium, 
was assembled in Flanders, on the northern frontier of France. It was 
soon made evident that to this army would be left the decision of the 
future political state of Europe, and the greatest efforts were consequently 
directed by each of the allies to increase its numbers and efficiency, and 
to support it with necessary reserves. Reinforcements were despatched from 
England without interruption, and in the course of the month the Duke 
of Wellington arrived in Brussels, to assume the command of his army 
consisting of the British, Hanoverian and Belgian troops, with the 
contingents of Nassau and Brunswick Oels. 

The riots which took place in Liondon consequent upon the discussion 
of the Corn Laws in Parliament in the month of March, 18 15, were followed 
by similar disturbances in various parts of the country, and among other 
places Norwich had sufficient ground for becoming alarmed by hostile mob 
demonstration. On the i6th March, the great Thomas William Coke, of 
Holkham, to whose spirited exertions and liberality Norfolk was chiefly 
indebted for many of its agricultural improvements, was present at a show 
of prize cattle held upon Norwich Hill, when a number of persons, acting 
upon the assijtnption that he was a supporter of the Corn Bill, proceeded to 
treat him in a very rough and violent manner. Having riotously assembled 
in front of the yard of the Jolly Farmers public-house, the mob hurled a 
volley of stones and brickbats at Mr. Coke and his friends, who fled for 
safety to the yard of the Angel Inn, and closed the back gates upon their 
pursuers. The rioters then rushed round to the Market Place, with the 
object of effecting an entrance by the front gates, but a number of 
constables, who had been summoned, held them at bay. At half-past two 
o'clock matters had assumed so serious an aspect that the Mayor (Mr. 
J. W. Robberds), accompanied by the Sheriffs (Mr. C. Brown and Mr. 
W. Burt) and some of the aldermen, proceeded from the Guildhall and 
read the Riot Act, amid a shower of stones, turnips, and other missiles. 
A numerous party of roughs had by this time succeeded in breaking 
down the upper portion of the back gates, and would in a few minutes 
have been in possession of the yard but for the promptitude of the 
Sheriffs, who, at the head of a few spirited individuals, rushed into the 
midst of the assailants, and by seizing some of them overawed the rest At 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 1 5. 1 93 



four o'clock the mail coach got ready to start from the front gates, and 
thereupon the mob retired from the rear with the view of taking 
advantage of the momentary opening which would be afforded by the 
passage of the vehicle. At the same time, Mr. Coke and the Earl of 
Albemarle embraced this favourable opportunity to escape by the rear* 
and mounting their horses, galloped to the cross roads at St Stephen's 
gates, where they entered the Earl's carriage and were driven off to 
Quidenham HalL In the meanwhile, the Mayor, finding that the tumult still 
continued, availed himself of the assistance of a number of respectable citizens 
who offered their services as special constables, but as it was utterly impossible, 
without more efficient aid, to suppress the riot, his worship determined to 
summon the military. Accordingly at 4.30, the Brunswick Hussars, then 
stationed in Norwich, arrived from the barracks in the command of Lieut-Col. 
Von Tempsky, and placed themselves under the direction of the civil power. 
Their presence had the effect of quelling the disturbance, but after the 
military had been withdrawn at dusk the rioters once more assembled, smashed 
the windows of the magistrates' room at the Guildhall, and went in a body to 
the Mayor's house in St Saviour's, the windows of which they entirely 
demolished. In the course of the evening the Sheriffs and special constables 
patrolled the Market Place and its approaches, and compelled all persons in 
groups to disperse and retire. In this duty they were supported by a 
detachment of Hussars, but the work was not undertaken without considerable 
danger, for one of the Brunswickers was severely wounded in the cheek by a 
stone, hurled with such force that it knocked out several of his teeth. The 
disturbances were finally quelled, and four days afterwards a letter was 
addressed to the Mayor and magistrates, by Lord Sidmouth, on behalf of the 
Government, in which their exertions and activity were highly commended. 
At Thetford Assizes, on the 29th March, the grand jury made a presentment, 
in which they '' deeply regretted and most severely censured the riotous and 
malignant spirit which had lately exhibited itself within the city of Norwich 
and, considering it is an imperious duty publicly to express this opinion, and to 
exert ourselves to the utmost in suppressing such proceedings, it was resolved 
that a subscription not exceeding one pound an individual, be entered into for 
the purpose of bringing to public justice the instigators of the attack on 
Mr. Coke." 

Again on June loth, 1815, the Norfolk Chronicle teipotXs i ''We are most 
happy to state that since Saturday night there has not been the least 
appearance of any disposition to disturb again the peace and tranquility of 
this city. The police notice, issued the preceding evening by the 
magistrates was followed up by proper measures of precaution ; at sunset, 
a captains guard of the West Norfolk Militia were marched into the Hall ; 



194 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1815. 

the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, under Capt Hudson, assembled at 
the Swan Inn, a detachment of the first Royal Dragoons, was drawn up 
in the market place, and the magistrates, constables, and many of the 
respectable inhabitants, at the same time assembled at the HalL The 
populace in the evening collected in great numbers and behaving in a 
tumultuous manner, the riot act was read, when the cavalry proceeded to 
disperse them ; some who resisted, were taken into custody and committed 
to gaol, and before eleven all was quiet" 

In the same paper, at the same date, we read : — ^ On Sunday last our 
venerable Sovereign entered into the 78th year of his age. The Mayor, the 
Mayor elect, the Steward, the Sheriflfs, and several of the aldermen (in the 
robes of justice and gown) attended divine service at the cathedral, where 
an excellent and appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. W. F. 
Drake, from these words, ' Honour the King' ... at noon, the Brunswick 
Hussars gave a feu de joie in the Horse Barrack yard: the next day the 
Norwich Light Volunteers, commanded by Major J. Harvey, marched into 
the market place, performed several evolutions, and after Uirice discharging 
their pistols^ gave three cheers in honour of the day. The officers and 
gentlemen of the squadron, afterwards dined together at the Rose Inn, St 
Augustines. The Mayor gave a dinner at his own house, and the day 
was celebrated with the usual marks of loyalty and attachment" 



'* Monday last the Loddon troop commanded by Capt. Thompson, had 
a field day, and after going through their evolutions, filed off to the 
market place in Loddon, where they fired in honour of his Majestys 
birthday, and afterwards dined at the Swan Inn, where several gentlemen 
of the town and neighbourhood honoured them with their company, and 
the day was spent, and concluded at a late hour, with the greatest 
conviviality. 

"Cornet Gooch was proposed by Capt Thompson to be Lieut vice 
Denny resigned, and chosen without one disenting voice!* 



We must now refer again to Bonaparte, who by the energy and 
resource which he had displayed in the formation of an army, which 
proved itself so capable of contending with the combined force of 
Wellington and Blucher, displayed perhaps one of the most extraordinary 
phases of his extraordinary life. His gigantic efforts, and the hopes 
which were founded on them, were destined to a very brief continuance. 
It was reserved to the same unvaried perseverance and indomitable spirit 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1815. 195 



of a British army under a British leader, which in the Peninsula gave the 
Conqueror of Europe the first check to his victorious career, to take the 
principal share in the consummation of his final overthrow on the field of 
Waterloo. 

Great and decisive as were the results of this glorious victory, it was 
some time before its consequences on the political state of Europe could 
be appreciated to their full extent, and in the midst of the rejoicings on 
this crowning triumph of our arms, it was imperative on the Government 
at home to use their most strenuous exertions to supply the losses which 
that victory had occasioned. Every part of the Kingdom was drained of 
regular regiments, and the household troops, both cavalry and infantry, had 
left London early in the spring, in time to enjoy a distinguished share in 
the laurels of the i8th of June. To supply the deficiency thus occasioned 
in our domestic force, the Volunteer associations were again resorted tOi 
and the following letter from the Secretary of State was sent round to the 
various commandants of Yeomanry corps. 

Whitehall. 
26th June 1815. 

Sir, 

as the state of the war on the continent requires that the whole 
of the regular army of this country should be available for service abroad, 
it is necessary that effectual measures should be adopted for the purpose 
of providing, under any circumstances which may arise, a sufficient force at 
home. With this view His Majestys goverment are led to resort to the 
public spirit and zeal of the distinguished corps under your command, in 
the confident persuasion, that the officers, and other members of the 
corps, will be induced to afford their assistance, at this important 
conjuncture, by such an extension of their services, as their several 
occupations and engagements will allow. I have therefore to request your 
early attention, and that of your officers, to this subject, and I am 
convinced I should not do justice to the various corps of Yeomanry 
cavalry and Light horse volunteers, if I were to offer an apology for thus 
communicating to you, at such a crisis, the sentiments and wishes of His 
Majestys goverment 

I have the honour to be etc 

SIDMOUTH. 
To the officer commanding 

etc etc 



CHAPTER V. 

1816 to 1829. 

Riots in Norfolk and Norwich, 1816 — Machine Breaking in Norfolk, 1822 — 
Recollections of Charles Loftus, \%22— Presentation of Sword to 
Colonel Harvey — Weavers' Riots at Norwich, 1826-27 — Disbandment 
of Yeomanry, 1827. 

1816. 
The year 18 16 was the first of general continental peace, but in order to 
preserve the state of affairs which the victories of the preceding year had 
established, it was necessary that the leading powers of Europe should 
keep on foot an imposing display of military force, and Great Britain 
was called upon to maintain a numerous and completely appointed force 
as a part of the army of occupation, within the territory of Francei 
until the restored government of that country should assume a character 
of stability. The keeping up of this army necessarily occasioned a 
continual drain upon our regular forces, and consequently the maintenance 
of our domestic armed force became a matter of the greatest importance; 
under these circumstances the Yeomanry continued to preserve their 
efficiency by periodical field days and the usual drills and instructions 
in the use of arms. Notwithstanding the proud position held by this 
country in respect to its foreign relations, the year 1816 was a period 
of great internal distress; the sudden transition from a state of war to 
that of peace caused an extensive change in all our commercial relations. 
The pressure of taxation, consequent on the debt contracted during the 
contest, was severely felt by all ranks ; and the distress was materially 
aggravated by the unusual inclemency of the weather, which produced 
a failure in the harvest, and a consequent increase in the prices of 
provisions. Serious disturbances occurred in various parts of the country, 
in the agricultural as well as in the manufacturing or mining districts, 
and the outrages committed were of so dangerous a character that 
special commissions were issued for the trial of the rioters in some of 
the counties, many of whom were capitally convicted and executed. In 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 1 6. 197 



the suppression of these riots, and in the subsequent preservation of the 
peace, the Yeomanry Cavalry of the several counties which had been 
disturbed performed the most valuable services. 

The discontent at high prices increased, and in 18 16 there were more 
riots at Norwich and other places in the county. From letters of 
Mr. J. H. Yallop, the Mayor of Norwich, and Mr. John Patteson, we 
learn that the military were called to the aid of the local authorities 
on the 1 8th of May, and that the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers 
were also required to assist in restoring order, and this riot occurred 
notwithstanding that on the day previous the price of wheat was reduced 
\os, per quarter. Mr. Patteson impressed on the Secretary of State that 
there should always be a troop of horse kept in the Norwich barracks, 
for "the very sight of them is imposing, and they are known to be 
decided whenever their duty requires decision." He adds, ''I wish I 
could give your Lordship a better account of this city — ^it always has, 
and I fear always will, contain much inflamable matter, and can only 
be kept under by the strong hand of power." 

It was on the i6th May in this year that an alarming riot occurred in 
Norwich. Late in the evening a large number of the unemployed assembled 
in the Market Place and created a disturbance by throwing fire-balls. They 
next smashed the windows at the Guildhall and proceeded to the New 
Mills, breaking all the street lamps and the windows of several houses on 
their way thither. On arriving at the mills, the ringleaders broke into the 
stores and removed a large quantity of flour, some of which was thrown 
into the river and some carried away. Returning by way of St Andrew's 
Bank Street, and Tombland, in each of which localities the mob committed 
great depredations, they marched to Magdalen Street, and made a hostile 
demonstration in front of the residence of Dr. Alderson. Upon the doctor 
coming out to remonstrate with them, the ruffians knocked him down and 
subjected him to brutal ill-treatment. In consequence of these outrages, 
the Mayor summoned the magistrates to the Guildhall, and, as a result of 
their deliberations, a posse of constables, attended by a number of supporters, 
issued forth with staves and torches for the purpose of apprehending the 
rioters. A picket of the West Norfolk Militia, who had just returned from 
Ireland, were stationed at the Guildhall to prevent further damages to the 
building, and a squadron of the 1st Royal Dragoons, under Capt. Phipps, 
and headed by the Chief Magistrate, rode off to Trowse Mills, where it 
was rumoured that a further attack was to be made. Fortunately, these 
prompt measures had the effect of dispersing the mob, and the military 
accordingly returned to Norwich and patrolled the streets. On the following 
day a public notice was issued by the magistrates, pointing out that upon 



igS The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1816. 



a repetition of such tumults the Riot Act would be read, and persons 
offending would be ''liable to the penalty of Death." All respectable 
inhabitants were also required immediately, on the appearance of disorder, 
to repair to the Guildhall. At sunset on the following day a captain's 
guard of the Militia were marched to the Guildhall ; the Norwich Light 
Horse Volunteers, under the command of Capt Hudson, assembled in 
the yard at the Swan Inn ; a detachment of the 1st Royals were drawn 
up in the Market Place ; and the magistrates and constables held them- 
selves in readiness at the Guildhall. The rioters again assembled in the 
Market Place, and the Riot Act was read, but as soon as the cavalry 
received the order to move into position, the people wisely dispersed, 
and only two men, Ralph Hardy Sheppard and Robert Hatton, jun., 
who offered resistance, were apprehended. These persons were committed 
to take their trial at the Quarter Sessions, when Hatton was sentenced 
to three months' imprisonment, but the bill against Sheppard was ignored. 
Similar disturbances took place at about the same date at Swaffham, 
Downham, and other places, which necessitated the calling out of the 
Yeomanry Cavalry to assist the Civil power. 

On the 2 1 St May, 18 16, a great number of persons collected riotously at 
Rockland, and the Rev. Benjamin Barker, of Caston, near Watton, was 
apparently the only person available to attempt to appease the distressed and 
angry people. In the Hundred of Wayland at that time there was not a 
resident magistrate to whom Mr. Barker could refer, so mounting his horse he 
rode over, and for six hours used his utmost exertions to prevent breaches of 
the peace ; and finding that the disturbances extended to nearly the whole 
population of the three parishes of Rockland (All Saints, St. Andrew, and St. 
Peter), he despatched an express twelve miles to Thetford to catch the mail 
with a letter to the Secretary of State, intimating that unless precautionary 
measures were adopted further trouble must be expected. Three days later 
Mr. Barker wrote : *' The fact is the distress of the farmers is almost extreme, 
and they can hardly be persuaded to make further inroads on their capital for 
the purpose of paying the wages of labour, which they apprehend may be as 
unproductive as it has been for the last three years. And overseers are 
unwilling to expend their money in relieving the necessities, which they see no 
other method of replacing but by distress and sale of many of their neighbours 
property." 

As he wrote he heard of another parish in a state of disturbance, and 
in six contiguous parishes there was disaffection. Lord Sidmouth wrote, 
thanking the Rector of Caston for his services, applauded him for his energy, 
and expressed a hope that other individuals would follow his example. By the 
same post his Lordship also wrote to Lord Suffield, the Lord-Lieutenant, who 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 8 1 6. 1 99 



in his retirement at Gunton seems to have been unaware of what was going on , 
inquired why Mr. Barker had not been put into the G>mmi8sion of the Peace, 
said he had requested the Lord Chancellor to appoint that gentleman 
magistrate unless Lord Suffield knew of any objection. He also expressed his 
surprise that the Lord-Lieutenant had made no report to the Home Office 
either as to the riots at Norwich or the commotions in other parts of the 
county. Lord Suffield, writing from Gunton on the 26th May, explained that 
the Norwich matters had been more particularly within the province of the 
Mayor, who had duly reported thereon ; and as to other places, he thought the 
nature of the occurrences had been exaggerated ; but be that as it may, no 
magistrate had reported to him the disturbances, or he would not have been so 
remiss in his duty as not to have communicated such tidings. He promised to 
send at once to all the county justices to keep him informed On the same 
day the Secretary of State received intelligence that three men and four 
women had been received at Norwich Castle, and others were expected for 
riots at Downham ; and it is stated that they had to be escorted across the 
county by a detachment of the Yeomanry Cavalry. 

The Downham case was the most serious of all the local disturbances at 
this time. It appears that the district magistrates, Mr. John Thurlow Dering, 
Mr. Hare, and Mr. Pratt, met at the Crown Inn at Downham, and after 
reviewing the condition and demands of the labourers, resolved that the ^ages 
should be fixed at 2x a day, and that flour should be supplied to poor families 
of not less than four in number, at zr. 6d. per stone, the regular price at the 
time being 3^. 9^. A considerable crowd had collected from the neighbouring 
parishes, and on hearing this decision declared its dissatisfication, and became 
very riotoua The magistrates went into the Market Place to expostulate, but 
were insulted, and the mob with sticks and bludgeons drove them back to the 
inn, into which the more violent followed them, bursting open the doors, and 
threatening to throw the gentlemen out of the window. Thus pursued, the 
magistrates attempted an escape by a back way, but were followed and pelted 
with stones and dirt Mr. Pratt and Mr. Dering received several violent blows, 
and with difficulty obtained refuge in different houses — Mr. Dering at Mr. 
Wales', Mr. Hare at Mr. Lemmon's, and Mr. Pratt at Col. Say's. Mr. Dering 
was the principal object of the mob's vengeance, and was so hunted that he had 
to be concealed in a garden for two hours, the excited people declaring they 
would murder him if they could find him. He and Mr. Hare afterwards 
escaped to Mr. Safiery's. Shops were meanwhile plundered of their goods, and 
publicans were compelled to make gratuitous distribution of beer. 

In this emei^ency means were discovered to send to Captain Lee of 
Upwell, requesting him to assemble his troop of Yeomanry Cavalry for the 
relief of the town, and a messenger was dispatched to Thetford for the military 



200 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1816. 

stationed there. An appeal was made to the inhabitants to be sworn special 
constables, but so great was the fear that not half a score responded till after 
the arrival of Captain Lee with his troop of forty of the Yeomanry, when as 
many as seventy offered themselves. Several arrests were made, among 
the others being two Southery men, and this led to further serious complied- 
tions. The Southery people generally had not participated in this Downham 
riot, but hearing that two of their fellow-parishioners were in prison, their 
clannish feeling was aroused, and in a spirit which showed a remnant of 
feudalism they repaired to the squire of the village, Mr. Martin, and demanded 
of him that he should lead to secure the release of these two men, to enforce 
which object they would risk their lives. They were a sturdy band, and 
gathered supporters in their march towards Downham, till they numbered 
between seven and eight hundred men, armed with lai^e sticks, scythes, and pitch- 
forks, about forty of them being armed with those long-barrelled duck-guns used 
for shooting wild fowl in the fens, and loaded with slugs. At the sight of this 
formidable array Mr. Dering released the two Southery men, but the victory 
thus achieved stimulated the zeal of the mob as deliverers, and they insisted on 
the doors of the Downham prison-house being thrown open that all who had 
been arrested should go free, threatening to enforce their demand by murderous 
violence to any who resisted 

The terror-stricken magistrates, apprehending the loss of life that would 
probably result from a conflict between these armed and infuriated men and 
the Yeomanry Cavalry, yielded to the demand and released the offenders. 
The mob having at length dispersed, Downham was presently occupied by a 
troop of regular cavalry, and nineteen persons were directly after arrested and 
committed, some to Norwich Castle and others to Swaffham Bridewell ; and in 
the following month of August, Lord Chief Justice Gibbs tried them at the 
Norwich Assizes, when sixteen prisoners were condemned to death, but two 
only were executed, the others having their sentences commuted. 

At Wisbech, at this time also, a state of things existed that necessitated 
the presence of 120 men of the Yeomanry corps, and several persons were 
arrested and sent to Ely, three of whom were from UpwelL At the same 
time, though Lord Suffield had not heard of them, riots had occurred at 
Brandon and the neighbourhood, especially in the parishes of Feltwell and 
Hockwold-cum- Wilton, in the Hundred of Grimshoe, where Mr. Moseley, the 
resident ms^istrate, had on his own responsibility called out the local 
Yeomanry, and, as he afterwards explained, for which he had neither the 
authority of the Lord-Lieutenant or of the High Sheriff. At Mundford also, 
there had been similar outbreaks, and the Brandon mob was reported by 
the post-boys to be marching to this latter parish. Mr. Moseley stated 
that the inhabitants declared they dare not make any affidavits which 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1816. 201 



might lead to the arrest of any of the disturbers of the peace unless they 
were protected by the presence of the military. Mr. John Wright, writing 
from Kilverstone on the 27th May, mentions having just sent four of the 
Hockwold men to Norwich Castle, and advises Mr. Barker at Caston, in 
case of more disturbances at Rockland, to send to Mr. Gilman for the 
Hingham troop. At Castle Acre and Sporle the labouring people had 
demanded an increase of wages and a reduction in the price of bread. 
There had in several places been a breaking of threshing machines, especially 
in the Hundred of Shropham, and in fact matters assumed a very threatening 
appearance, though on the 4th of June, Lord Suffield wrote to Lord Sidmouth 
that he had ascertained that of the thirty-three Hundreds in the county 
twenty-eight remained in a state of tranquillity. 



Norfolk Chronicle^ May 25 th, 1816. 

''The Swaffham Yeomanry Cavalry commanded by P. Hamond Esqr 
were called out on Monday last to quell a tumultuous meeting of 
labourers etc, who had assembled at Mundford. After the riot act had 
been read, the troop then paraded the street, and soon dispersed the 
rioters." 

''On May 25th a great number of persons assembled in the neighbour^ 
hood of Downham, and on their arrival at that place committed the 
most serious depredations, and insulted the magistrates who were 
assembled at the Crown Inn, to hold their weekly sittings. It was 
found necessary to read the riot act, after which the inhabitants, aided 
by special constables, and the Up well Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by 
Capt Lee, attacked the rioters and after a violent contest, gradually 
dispersed them ; but the morning following, they returned in greater 
numbers, apparently with more mischievous intentions. They were met 
by the cavalry and the inhabitants, when such conciliatory measures 
were adopted, as induced the rioters to return peaceably to their homes. 
The exertions and forbearance of the cavalry on this occasion deserve 
the greatest praise and the thanks of the inhabitants. 

"On June ist the Upwell troop were again sent for, the Magistrates 
and inhabitants expecting another visit from the insurgents of Southery 
and its neighbourhood, in consequence of the demands not being com- 
plied with ; they insisted on 2/- per day for their labour, and to be 
paid for Monday and Tuesday, (the days they were rioting at Downham 
and Mundford) also fixed their price for Bread and Flour, etc When 
the Troop arrived (about 7. in the evening) the special constables were 



202 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1816. 

on the alert, and several men were taken into castody. On Saturday 
morning seven persons were fuUy committed for trial and the same 
evening were conve)^ to the Castle by a guard of the Yeomanry 
Cavalry, from Downham, and on Sunday morning last, many more 
prisoners were brought in, who have not been examined. The SwafTham 
and Didlington troops of Yeomanry still remain at Downham. The 
Dereham two troops marched from thence on Monday. 

*'The Upwell troops were ordered to Wisbech on Sunday morning 
to meet the March and Whittlesey Troops, the Magistrates and inhabitants 
being fearful of outrages, but every precaution was taken and the peace 
was preserved. 

^At a special Assembly of the Corporation thanks also, was voted 
to the Officers and men of the ist or Royal Dragoons, the West Norfolk 
Militia, and the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, who so readily and 
effectually co-operated with the Magistrates of the City in checking 
and quelling the late outrages and riotous Proceedings. 

^A circular letter was addressed by the Lord Lieut of the County 
to the commanding Officers of the Yeomanry Cavalry to hold their 
corps 10 a state of preparation, to act in aid of the Civil power in 
case of any tumultuous disturbance. 

"About the same time," the Norfolk Chronicle states, '*an express 
arrived in this City for a detachment of the first Royal Dragoon Guards 
to march from thence to Ely to assist in quelling the disturbances in 
that neighbourhood. The same evening seven of those who had been 
guilty of the disorders at Downham, consisting of three men and four 
women, were conveyed to the Castle by a guard of Yeomanry Cavalry 
from Downham, and on Monday night four more were brought in." 



There are no returns of officers for the year 18 16 among the War 
Office records, except for the 



LYMM AND FBBBBBIDGB CAVALBY 



Lt-Colonel Joseph Taylor 

Major John Lloyd residence Pentney 

Lieut Thomas Glasspool „ Wooton 

Qr. Master James Murrill „ Wormegay 

34 rank and file 

I give it here as it appears; but the Yeomanry seem during these 
years succeeding to have enjoyed a somewhat somnolent existence; there 
is no mention of their disbandment, and some of the corps still 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 8 1 6- 1 7. 203 

persevered in their drills in a spasmodic fashion ; on the other hand 
there are corps who seem to disappear as rapidly as they came into 
existence. 

1817. 

In the beginning of 1817, the attention of both Houses of Parliament 
was called to the disturbed and disaffected state of the country, secret 
committees both of the Lords and Commons were appointed to investigate 
the nature and extent of the seditious practices which were known to 
prevail throughout the country, more especially in the Metropolis; the 
reports of both these committees were presented in February, and the 
evidence which they disclosed of the existence of a traitorous and 
organized conspiracy against the established Government and institutions 
of the country was so alarming that bills for the suspension of the 
Habeas Corpus Acts were passed in both Houses. The disaffection in 
London had early shown itself by the outrages offered to the Prince 
Regent on his way from opening Parliament, when the windows of his 
carriage were broken by stones or bullets from an air-gun ; whilst 
revolutionary doctrines were propagated in the numerous union clubs and 
secret societies, and by the circulation of inflammatory publications. 
Under these circumstances, the Yeomanry Cavalry in the country afforded 
the most valuable support to the Government 

By the month of March in this year, the evidence of the existence 
of a spirit of disaffection and sedition, both in London and in many 
parts of the country, especially in the Midland Counties, continued to 
be so manifest that the acts for the further suspension of the Habeas 
Corpus were renewed in both Houses of Parliament before the close of 
the session ; disturbances of a serious and treasonable character took 
place in some of the manufacturing districts, which were not suppressed 
without the interference of a strong military force. Several of the ring- 
leaders having been brought to trial under a special commission, and 
being found guilty of high treason, suffered the extreme penalty of the 
law. 

From the drill notices which appear frequently in the newspapers 
at this time, it is evident that the yeomanry corps of Norfolk were 
actively employed, and no doubt the disturbed state of the county 
demanded their attention. 

June 4th — King George III., entered upon his 80th year. The event 
was celebrated in Norwich by the ringing of bells and by a parade of the 
Light Horse Volunteers and Yeomanry Cavalry. 

First or West Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1817. 

No names given. 



204 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1817. 



Second or Midland Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1817. 


Lt. Colonel 


Hamond Alpe 


14 March 1808 


Major 


Robert Wilson 


23 July 1803 


Captain 


William Lee 


5 Sept 1803 


•» 


Philip Hamond 


30 Jan 1810 


1* 


Edmund Wodehouse 


14 June 1813 


»i 


George Wymer 


3 July 1813 


Lieut 


Thomas Harvey 


23 July 1803 


»> 


Edward Case Oilman 


14 March 1808 


It 


James Lee 


24 May 1808 


>f 


Ralph Caldwell 


19 Feb 1810 


»* 


Thomas Partridge 


24 Jan 1814 


•1 


John Marcon 


28 Aug 1816 


Cornet 


Thomas Coningshy Watson 


14 March 1808 


>f 


Samuel Tyssen 


6 Sept 1812 


n 


John Lister 


12 Oct 1812 


» 


John Varlo Wymer 


17 April 1814 


» 


Edward Powell 


15 April 1817 


Adjutant 


James Murray 


7 Jan 1804 


Surgeon 


Peter Elvin Williams 


17 April 1814 


Third or East Norfolk Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1817. 


Lt Colonel 


Charles Laton 


29 Sept 181 1 


Major 


John Harvey 


9 Nov i8u 


Captain 


Edmund K. Lacon 


25 June 1803 


II 


Anthony Hudson 


24 Feb 1804 


» 


John Darell 


25 July 1806 


If 


Samuel Mitchell 


14 July 1807 


If 


Henry Negus Burroughes 


13 June 1816 


» 


John Winn Grooch 


24 Dec 18 16 


Lieut. 


Thomas Utting 


25 April 1808 


9* 


Charles Helvis Laton 


6 April 1 8 10 


»» 


William Jary 


8 July 1816 


19 


Richard Squire 


6 Dec 1816 


» 


George Harvey 


7 Dec 1816 


II 


Thomas Drake 


29 May 1817 


Cornet 


Francis Riches 


25 April 1808 


91 


William Spelman 


I Feb 1809 


99 


John Burcham 


23 Oct 1813 


9f 


Thomas Saul 


8 July 1816 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1817-19. 205 



Cornet Henry Burton 6 Dec 1816 

„ John Page 7 Dec 18 16 

Adjutant Roger Hayes 14 March 1804 



LYNN AND FREBBRIDGE CAVALRY 

Lt Colonel Joseph Taylor 11 Oct 1805 

Major John Lloyd 22 May 1804 

Lieut. Thomas Glasspool 

YARMOUTH CAVALRY 

Captain Edmund Knowles Lacon 25 June 1803 

Lieut . 

Comet William Spelman i Feb 1809 
No other returns 



1818. 

The distinguishing event in the annals of 181 8 was the final settlement 
of the political affairs of Europe. Orders being issued for the withdrawal 
of all the armies of occupation from the territories of France, an 
immediate and extensive reduction of our military force was a necessary 
consequence. In making this reduction, reliance was placed on the 
continuance of the support given to the domestic force of the country by 
the established troops of Yeomanry and Volunteer Cavalry. 

The only corps which furnished a return to the War Office for the 
year 1818 was the Downham Cavalry, as under: — 

Captain William Say 

Qr. Master William Oakes 

2 Sergeants, Thomas Roper, Thomas Drake 

2 Corporals, Samuel Johnson, John Laws 

Trumpeter, John Long 

41 Privates 



1819. 
The probability, to which I have before adverted, that the services of 
the Yeomanry would be required for the support of the constituted 
authorities was fully confirmed by the events during the year 18 19. The 
severe distress and want of employment which prevailed in many districts 
afforded an opportunity for the dissemination of the inflammatory 



2o6 The Records of the Yeonumry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1819*20. 



doctrines of the political agitators, by whom the Kingdom was ovemia 
The attention of the Government and of Parliament, at an early period of 
the session, had been called to the dangers with which the internal 
tranquillity of the country was threatened; a Proclamation against 
seditious meetings was issued by the Prince Regent, and bills were passed 
in both Houses authorising the search for and seizure of arms in the 
possession of suspected persons, and prohibiting unauthorised military training. 
The excitement of the public mind was increased by the continued meetings 
and societies, of the question of Parliamentary Reform, and the discussion 
of this popular topic was carried on with peculiar violence in the great 
manufacturing districts of Birmingham, Leeds, and Manchester. In the 
last of these towns especially, a tumult of a most formidable character 
took place on the i6th of August, which was not quelled without the 
intervention of the R^ulars and Yeomanry, and was attended with a 
serious loss of life and destruction of property. 

There are no lists or returns of the Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry for the 
year 1819. 



182a 
The commencement of 1820 is chiefly remarkable as closing the long 
reign of King Greorge III., who expired on the 29th of January. Long as 
this event had been expected, and prepared as was the public for its 
occurrence by the protracted affliction under which his Majesty had suffered, 
yet the feeling on this occasion was deep and general, and corresponded 
with those sentiments of veneration and attachment, which had been 
habitually entertained towards the monarch by all classes of his subjects. 
This feeling pervaded the country, and amongst its inhabitants was 
experienced by no class more sincerely than by the Yeomanry. From the 
term of their first formation, a period of more than forty years, they had 
been accustomed to look to George III. as their peculiar patron and friend ; 
and so long as he was in the possession of his mental faculties, he lost no 
opportunity of affording them the most distinguishing marks of his royal 
favour and protection. 

The drill and field days of the Norfolk Yeomanry were continued 
through the spring and summer, and in addition to the usual training, con- 
siderable attention was given to the acquisition of the new sword exercise, 
recently adopted by the army. 

There are frequent orders for attendance at drills at the troop centres 
in the local papers, which shows the Yeomanry still continued active. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1820. 



207 





Norfolk Rangers : 1820. 




Major 


Lord Charles Vere Townshend 

ZST TROOP 


6 Aug 1808 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


Nicholas John Raven 
John Whiteman 
John Billing 

2ND TROOP 


6 April 1813 
14 Aug 1815 
19 Sept 1818 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


Charles William Hill 
Jennis Diggings 
Thomas Webb 

DOWNHAM TROOP 


20 Feb 1817 

>» » » 
31 July 1815 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


William Say 
Edward Pratt 
John Barsham 


25 July i8i6 


Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1820. 


Lieut-Colonel 

Major 

Captain 

9f 


Hamond Alpe 
Robert Wilson 
William Lee 
Philip Hamond 
Edmund Wodehouse 
George Wymer 


9 Nov 181 1 
23 July 1803 

5 Sept 1803 

20 Jan 18 10 
14 June 1813 

3 July 1813 


Lieut 
>» 

M 

)> 
>» 


Edward Case Gilman 

Thomas Harvey 

James Lee 

Ralph Caldwell 

Thomas Partridge 

John Marcon 

Thomas Coningsby Watson 


14 March 1808 

23 July 1803 

24 May 1808 
19 Feb 1 8 10 
24 Jan 1 8 14 

28 Aug 1816 
26 Sept 1818 


Cornet 
ft 


Samuel Tyssen 
John Lister 
John Varlo Wymer 
Edward Powell 
Robert Kirbell 


6 Sept 1812 

12 Oct 1812 

17 April 1 8 14 

IS April 1817 

26 Sept 1818 


Adjutant 
Surgeon 


Richard Money 
' Peter Elvin Williams 


5 Sept 1818 
17 April 1814 



3o8 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry cf Norfolk, 1S30-21, 



Thiro or Eastern 


Regiubnt of Norfolk Yeohahry Cavalrv : 182a 


Ueut-Colooel 


Charles Laton 


29 Sept 181 1 


Major 


John Harvey 


9 Nov 1811 


Captaio 


Anthony Hudson 


24 Feb 1804 


. 


Sir Edmund Knowles Lacon Bart 


35 June 1803 


„ 


John DaKll 


25 July 1806 


„ 


Samuel MitcheU 


14 July 1807 


^ 


Henry Negus Buiroughes 


13 June 1816 


„ 


John Winn Gooch 


24 Dec 1816 


•► 


Matthew Gunthorpe 


21 June 1819 


Lieut 


Thomas Utting 


2$ April 1808 


„ 


Charles HelvU Laton 


6 April 18 10 


„ 


WUIiam Jary 


8 July 1816 


„ 


Richard Squire 


6 Dec 1816 


„ 


George Harvey 


7 Dec 1816 


„ 


Thomas Drake 


29 May 1 817 


„ 


Timothy Steward jun. 


I Aug 1817 


" 


William Spetman 


31 June 1S19 


Cornet 


Francis Riches 


25 April 1808 


n 


John Burcham 


33 Oct 181 3 


y. 


Thomas Saul 


8 July 1 8 16 


„ 


Henry Burton 


6 Dec 1 816 


„ 


John Page 


7 Dec 1816 


„ 


Manning Keer 


24 April 181S 


.• 


John Drake 


17 May 1820 


AdjuUnt 


Roger Hayes 


14 March 1804 


Surgeon 











On April 23rd, 1821, the Norfolk Chroniclt relates : — 

" St Georges Day being now appointed for the Celebration of the 

Birthday of our Gracious Sovereign, (instead of the 12th of August his 

Majestys natal day) it was observed here with the most respectful 

tmonstrations of loyalty and constitutional attachment The morning was 

ihered in by the ringing of bells, and the Union Flag was displayed on 

: Peters and other Steeples. While the court was at Church, the two troops 

Norwich Light Horse, commanded by Major John Harvey, marched into 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 182 1. 209 



the Market Place, where they drew up and opened ranks. Soon after, 
Captain Campbell of the 9th Lancers, at the head of two troops of that fine 
regiment of Light Cavalry, stationed in the City entered the square, and 
formed on the right of the Squadron of the Norwich Light Horse. The 
whole in one line then fired three voUies with their pistols, the trumpets 
played God Save the King between each, and the Cavalry gave three cheers. 
After marching past the Commanding Officer in review order, the Lancers 
and the Light Horse awaited the return of the Mayor and Corporation to 
the Guild- Hall, which did not take place until half past two. As soon as 
the Court appeared upon the Hall leads, the troops dismounted by word 
of command, when the Officers repaired by invitation to the Council Chamber, 
and joined the Court in drinking his Majestys Health in the most cordial 
manner. 

"The officers then remounted their chargers, and the troops left the 
Market Place, which was lined with spectators to witness the civil and 
military observations of the day. Major Harvey and the Officers and men 
of the Norwich Squadron celebrated the day at the White Lion Inn, St 
Benedicts with the utmost loyalty and convivialty.'' 

The next function at which the Yeomanry were called upon to assist 
was Coronation Day. The Norfolk Chronicle for July 19th, 1821, thus 
describes it: — 

'' At 10 o'clock the Mayor (Wm. Rackham Esq), Mr Steward Alderson ; 

the Sheriffs, (Aldermen Francis and Booth), the Aldermen and Common 

Council assembled at the Guild Hall, and proceeded from thence, passing 

under the noble Arch erected for the occasion to the Cathedral in the 

following order; — 

''A troop of the 9th Lancers under Captain Campbell, 

''64 Waterloo men who fought and conquered on the glorious i8th of 

June wearing medals. 

''The Lo)ral Constitutional Clubs with Flags, at their head formed 

four deep, the members wearing laurels and labels but no party colours. 

''Common Standard bearer on horseback. 
"Beadles on horseback. 
" The Speaker (A. A. H. Beckwith Esq) and Common Councilmen in 16 

carris^es. 

"Band of Music playing God save the King 

"Under Chamberlain and Mace Bearers on horseback 

"The Mayor attended by his sword bearer in his carriage; 

"The Steward, Sheriffs, Aldermen, Town Clerk, and Chamberlain, in 

10 carriages; o 



2IO The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1821-22. 



" The squadron of Norwich Light Horse under Capt Hayes. 

" About one o clock the Court returned in the same order to the Market 
Place ; the troops having drawn up, the Corporation in their carriages 
formed in the square to witness the preparation for distributing Beef, Bread, 
and Beer. Between four and five o'clock 250 Gentlemen sat down to 
Dinner in St Andrews Hall, where toasts were drank. Captain Hayes in 
the name of Major Harvey and the Norwich Light Horse, returned thanks 
for the corps, and said that the corps were always at the service of their 
fellow citizens whenever the object was to promote order, unanimity or 
brotherly kindness." 



1822 
The year 1822 was one of much agricultural distress, and several parts 
of the county of Norfolk were in a disturbed state. Threatening letters 
were received by many persons, which were not . unfrequently followed by 
acts of incendiarism. Considerable assemblages of people took place in 
some of the rural districts, and it was believed that secret clubs were 
formed for the purpose of destroying threshing machines. At Kenninghall 
there was a tumultuous meeting of more than a hundred persons and the 
Riot Act had to be read, and warning given of the consequences which 
would ensue unless they dispersed. These things were represented to the 
Secretary of State by T. B. Evans, R. Flumtre,' John Humfrey, M. Beevor, 
J. Surtees, and B. Kittmer, Justices of the Peace, with an intimation that 
the civil authority was not sufficient to maintain order, and they apprehended 
greater troubles. They asked for troops of dragoons to be dispatched to 
Norfolk, part to be stationed at Diss and part at Norwich. Several 
arrests were made meanwhile, and men committed to the county gaol, and 
when the Magistrates met in Quarter Sessions on the 6th of March they 
received information of a probable attempt to rescue such prisoners as had 
been committed for riot and breaking machines in the neighbourhood of 
Wymondham and other places; and they resolved to form a Committee, 
whose duty it should be to secure a sufficient guard for the Castle from 
the staff of the West Norfolk Militia, they themselves taking the direction, 
and such guard to be continued as long as the Committee deemed desirable. 
At the same time, Mr. Rackham, the Mayor of Norwich, reported that 
the disturbances in the country districts produced a feverish temper among 
the lower classes of the city, and that should any disturbance occur, there 
were no troops within forty miles, except the Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers, under Major Harvey. He hoped the Government would 
authorise the use of the cavalry barracks for the use of the Yeomanry 



\ 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1822. 211 



Cavalry, for he was anticipating the necessity of caUing upon them in case 
an attempt should be made to effect a rescue of those imprisoned. Matters 
grew worse during several months, and on one Saturday night, between 
ten and eleven o'clock, a mob, who in their progress had broken ten 
threshing machines, marched into the market place at Wymondham, with 
a machine in their midst, and then amid shouts and cheers demolished 
it On the following Monday nine more were destroyed in the same 
neighbourhood. In this district the Wymondham and Hingham Yeomanry 
were called out. 

In March, 1822, the agricultural labourers of Norfolk started an insane 
crusade against farmers who had introduced threshing and other niachinery 
upon their occupations. On the 4th, upwards of one hundred rioters 
assembled at Attleborough, and proceeded to the farms of Mr. John Page 
Mr. Mann, and Mr. Calver, Shropham ; Mr. Fisk and Mr. Palmer, Snetterton ; 
and Mr. W. Parsons, jua, Attleborough, and destroyed all the thrashing 
and drilling machinery to be found. As there was every indication of a 
continuation of the disturbances, the third troop of Suffolk Yeomanry 
Cavalry was summoned from Eye. The military, under the command of 
CoL Key, accompanied by about one hundred mounted farmers, and headed 
by Mr. John Wright, of Kilverstone, Mr. John Ayton, of Eccles, and the 
Rev. J. Surtees, of Banham, county justices, marched into Attleborough, 
where intelligence was received that a riot was in progress at New 
Buckenham. Thither the cavalry rode with all speed, and succeeded in 
capturing one of the most desperate of the ringleaders, and in dispersing 
the rest of the mob. That night the yeomen were quartered in the 
neighbourhood, and held in readiness for instant service; and on the 
ensuing day, when the rioters once more assembled, other ringleaders were 
apprehended, taken before the magistrates, and summarily committed for 
trial at the Assizes. In the evening eight of the prisoners were placed in 
a van, and, under the escort of the Yeomanry Cavalry, conveyed to Norwich 
Castle. After lodging their prisoners in gaol, the escort were assailed by a 
numerous mob of Norwich roughs, who pelted them with stones and dirt, 
and followed them with hoots and menaces to the Trowel and Hammer 
inn, St Stephen's, where the horses were baited The house was for some 
time in a state of siege, and not a square of glass was left whole in the 
windows. After a much needed rest, the detachment, which, under the 
charge of Sergt Motts, of Fressingfield, had shown the coolest determination 
and courage in the face of overwhelming odds, resumed their march to 
the headquarters established at East Hading, which they reached at three 
o'clock on the following morning, after being twenty hours in the saddle 
and having covered about eighty miles. Owing to the continued hostility 



212 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1822. 



of the Norwich mob, it was found necessary to station a captain's guard 

of the East Norfolk Militia upon the Castle Hill, and as the cavalry barracks 

were at that time unoccupied by regular troops, the Norwich Light Horse 

Volunteers were kept on duty every day for a week, until relieved by a 

troop of the i6th Lancers, sent over from Ipswich, under the command 

of Lieut Crossley. In the meantime, so many prisoners were brought in 

from other parts of the country that preparations had to be made for 

their removal to the bridewells at Wymondham, Aylsham, Walsingham, and 

Swaffham. The escorts in each case were furnished by the Lancers and 

Light Horse Volunteers, who were subjected to all kinds of indignities on 

the march. The volunteer cavalry on their way to Aylsham were attacked 

by a mob in Magdalen Street, and one of the horsemen was severely injured, 

and at St Faith's they were received with volleys of stones, while a crowd 

of women threw bread and other provisions to the prisoners in the open 

vans. The rioters were tried at the Lent Assizes at Thetford, before Sir 

Richard Richards, Kt, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and sentenced to 

long terms of imprisonment His Majesty's Secretary of State, on the 

15th of March, conveyed to the Lord-Lieutenant of the county the thanks 

of the Government for taking the necessary steps to quell the disturbances. 

He added : ^ I have at the same time to request that you will express to 

the officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates of the Yeomanry 

Cavalry, who have been employed upon the occasion, the high sense 

which I entertain of the zeal and alacrity displayed by them, as well as 

the great advantages which have resulted from their services, and assure 

them that I shall not fail to take the earliest opportunity of representing 

their conduct to his Majesty." 

Charles Loftus, in " My Life," says : — 

"About this time, I remember, I had been out all day on the marshes 
in search of wild fowl, and did not return till a quarter of an hour before 
dinner, when I found that my uncle. Lord James Townshend, had been 
over from Yarrow in order to see me, but had gone home. My father 
informed me that he had come over for the purpose of asking me to assist 
him in taking command of some yeomanry which had been laid on the 
shelf but which had been originally raised by his father, the old Marquis, 
during the war, and after peace had been declared, not exactly disbanded, 
but left in the same state as the militia regiments, liable to be called out 
at any time. It appeared that there were several corps of this kind still 
on the muster roll of the Horse Guards, and which were under the control 
of the Lord-Lieutenant of the counties. The Lord-Lieutenant had written 
to my uncle, the only son living of the old Marquis, asking him to take 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1822. 213 



command of this corps, as it was to be called out to go on duty for a 
certain time, and to be inspected. I knew of this kind of service, as they 
were cavalry, and were composed of the tenants and farmers sons. There 
was a muster-roll somewhere, but where to find it no one knew. Having 
fully discussed all the circumstances of the case, it was determined that 
we should meet at Fakenham Market, where we should be sure to find 
some of the old members of the corps who had joined when young, and 
who would be able to give us the information we required. Accordingly, 
on the market-day, we duly met at Fakenham, where we were fortunate 
enough to meet a man, occupying one of the largest farms on the Raynham 
estate, who still held a commission as lieutenant in the corps, and who 
had in his possession a muster-roll of the men composing it. In consequence 
of this lucky meeting, my uncle wrote to the Lord-Lieutenant, undertaking 
the command, and sent in my name as first captain of the corps. It would 
not be interesting for me to go through all the details of hunting up the 
men whose names were enrolled as members of the corps — a task which 
took some time to perform. Some were dead, others too old to take the 
field again, and their places had to be supplied by others ; however, there 
were young men ready to come forward to fill up the vacancies, and in 
about two months we completed our list The uniforms were made very 
similar to that of the rifles — green, with black facings and black braid, 
shako and black plume, dark grey trousers with a white stripe. The officers 
had silver epaulettes and a narrow stripe down the trousers. 

" The thing now was to get them into some kind of order and discipline. 
I had been for some time making myself au fait with the cavalry move- 
ments. My father being an old cavalry ofiicer, soon put me to rights on 
this subject ; and he had several books, from which I soon learnt all that 
I required. I was lucky to get three or four old cavalry soldiers who had 
settled in the county to join us. Two of them had been sergeants in my 
father's old regiment, the 24th Light Dragoons, and had served in India. 
These men were of great use to me. We had some private drills, getting the 
men together as well as we could in squads, and after the spring of the 
next year it was determined that they should go on duty for ten days 
into the town of Fakenham, which was the most convenient for both officers 
and men. 

" I have said that in taking command of a troop of cavalry which had 
been raised by my grandfather. Lord Townshend, at the recommencement 
of the war between France and England, I had after some difficulty, got 
the two troops t(^ether, and into some degree of order ; but I soon 
observed that it required great tact to keep them so. In the first place, I 
found then, as I have since been convinced from long experience, that the 



214 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1822. 



whole force of the yeomanry and the volunteers is in reality of a very 
diflicult description to manage. I, individually, have no cause to complain. 
I always experienced the greatest civility ; my orders were attended to, and 
there was an esprit de corps which animated all the members composing 
the troops. It must be remembered that these men were all independent 
of me, and had I been unmindful of this fact, I should never have been 
able to retain them so long as I did To hold command it is requisite 
that the officers should be acquainted with r^imental duty, and if the 
privates see that their superior officers understand their work, they are 
the more ready to receive their orders, and obey their instructions. From 
the four non-commissioned officers whom I appointed to the corps — 
namely two to each troop, men who had served in the 24th Light 
Dragoons in India — I obtained great assistance. They were pensioners, 
and occupied small portions of land in the vicinity of Fakenham, and 
each rode a good horse. 

''Men who served in Yeomanry Regiments were exempted from the 
duty on horses, and were not compelled to serve in the Militia when 
balloted for. 

"For the first eight consecutive days drill we went to Fakenham. 
Several members of the corps belonged to the Raynham tenantry, and 
were well mounted. Sergeant Bond was the oldest man in it, having 
entered the regiment on its first formation in 1803. This excellent and 
truly loyal man served in the Rangers until they, with other corps of this 
description were disbanded by the Whig government in 1829. This very 
year my uncle received from the inspecting of&cer of cavalry a very 
flattering report — and it was a true report— -of the discipline and efficiency 
of the corps. 

"In the midst of all the gaieties going on, I received a letter from 
Lord James Townshend, begging me to come down to Yarrow, for the 
yeomanry were to be out in two days time. They were to assemble at 
Fakenham^ as a riot was expected among the farm labourers, on account 
of a horse-thrashing machine, which had been brought into Norfolk. I 
did not lose a moment, but took my departure with the least delay 
possible. Arriving at Fakenham late at night, I took a gig, and drove 
to StifTkey, got my clothes and accoutrements, had my old horse saddled 
and equipped, sent an order out to' John Dunn to join, with his thorough- 
bred mare, and with two others, whom I had enlisted in StifTkey, I again 
started for Fakenham. At eight oclock the following morning, I found 
myself in the Market Place at the head of eighty good men and true, 
and sent off an express to my uncle, telling him what I had done, while 
I awaited his orders. I desired the men to put up their horses, and be 



The Records of the Yeomanry CavcUry of Norfolk, 1822. 215 



ready at bugle call to re-assemble. I lay down, and slept soundly. At 
ten oclock Captain Dewing and my uncle arrived, bringing in fifteen more 
men. We remained inactive till six oclock that evening, when the men 
were summoned and marched to Hempton Green, where they were put 
through some manoeuvres, to refresh their memories. At eight oclock the 
officers sat down to a comfortable repast at the Crown Inn, kept by 
Joshua Ward, whose son was in the corps. We took advantage of being 
thus assembled, on account of the threats of a riot, caused by the arrival 
of a thrashing machine from the fens, in the neighbourhood of Lynn, to 
muster every morning, and go through the usual forms of military duty 
in the market place, thus improving the discipline of the corps. Wishing 
to show the men what it was to halt on the march, we did so one day, 
on the way to Bircham, at Houghton, where having obtained permission 
from the steward, we entered the Park, dismounted, and linked horses. 
Every man having a havresack well stocked with cold meat, bread biscuits, 
etc, they enjoyed their repast during a halt of two hours. We returned in 
the evening to Fakenham. As my commanding officer thought it well to 
finish the eight days training, now that we were out, application was made 
for permission to that effect, and it was granted. At the expiration of 
our period of duty, no riot having occurred, we were inspected by a 
cavalry officer from Norwich. I felt very proud of the Rangers, with 
which little corps I had taken so much pains, and was elated by the 
praises I received for its efficiency, not only from him and my commanding 
officer, but from the Lord-Lieutenant also who was present. As it was 
the Kings birthday, we fired a feu de joie, and were dismissed." 

Norfolk Rangers: 1822. 

No return. 

Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1822. 

Lieut. Colonel Hamond Alpe 

HINGHAM TROOP 

Captain Hamond Alpe 

Lieut. Thomas Coningsby Watson 

Cornet Thomas Rose 

38 rank and file 

Third or East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1822. 

Lieut. Colonel John Harvey 

Major Anthony Hudson 

Adjutant Roger Hayes 

Surgeon Henry Carter 



2i6 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1822-23. 





NORWICH LIGHT ROR8B FIRST TR 


Captain 


Anthony Hudson 


Lieut. 


George Harvey 


Comet 


Henry Burton 


Qr. Master 


Samuel Barnes 


41 rank and file 






SECOND TROOP 


Captain 


Samuel Mitchell 


Lieut 


Richard Day Squire 


Qr. Master 


Robert Richards 


38 rank and file 






WYMONDHAM TROOP 


Captain 


John Darell 


Lieut 


Thomas Utting 


Comet 


William Clarke 


Qr. Master 


Benjamin Parsons 


35 rank and file 






YARMOUTH TROOP 


Captain 


Sir Edmund Lacon, Bt. 


Lieut. 


Matthew Gunthorpe 


Cornet 






BLOFIBLD AND SOUTH WALSHAll T 


Captain 


Henry Negus Burroughes 


Lieut 


William Jary • 


Cornet 


Thomas Tuck 




LODDON TROOP 


Captain 


John Winn Gooch 


Lieut 


Thomas Drake 


Cornet 









1823. 

The Norfolk Chronicle thus relates in its issue of April 36th, 1823, the 
celebration of the King's birthday at Norwich : — ^"^ The First Royal Dragoons 
(Capt Windowe) and the two troops of Norwich Light Horse (Major 
Hudson) marched into the Market Place, under command of Lieut Colonel 
John Harvey, formed line and awaited the arrival of the Court, who on 
their return from the Church, were received with a military salute. As 
soon as the Mayor and his brethren made their appearance on the 
Guildhall leads, the troops fired three voUies with their pistols, and after- 



714^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1823. 217 

wards gave the same number of cheers in honour of the day, in the 
presence of an immense concourse of spectators, St Peters bells ringing 
and firing during the ceremony. The troops then marched past the Lieut 
Col Commandant, and returned to their barracks and quarters. 

'* The Norwich Light Horse Volunteers dined together in celebration of 
the day. After the cloth was removed, the Health of the King, Duke of 
York and Army, Duke of Clarence and Navy, Duke of Wellington and 
the heroes of Waterloo, were drank with enthusiastic applause. Major 
Hudson then rose to present Lieut.-Col. Harvey, an elegant and valuable 
Scymetar, which was purchased by voluntary subscription of the corps. 
The manner in which Major Hudson presented this testimony of sincere 
attachment was marked with a degree of ease, elegance, and eloquence 
which made the deepest impression on his comrades. Among some observa- 
tions he took occasion to explain the use and service of Yeomanry Corps, 
and paid a just encomium to the generous and gentlemanly character of 
the worthy colonel, during the 26 years which he had commanded the 
Norwich Light Horse. He also b^ged particularly to acknowledge the 
many acts of kindness which he in common with his brother officers had 
received at his hands. He said the duty of the field had always been 
fulfilled in the most unanimous and cordial manner, and he had ever found 
Colonel Harvey ready to meet him in opinion with regard to the course 
of discipline most proper to be adopted; not a word of difference (the 
Major said) had occured between them since they served together in that 
corps. He was confident that he was speaking the sentiments of every 
individual present, when he said, 'this sword is presented in testimony of 
the uniform good and kind conduct, which you have at all times evinced 
towards this corps, from the moment your command commenced up to the 
present day.' 

*'The Major then delivered the sword into the hands of the Colonel 
expressing his confidence and the confidence entertained by every man in 
the two troops, that it would never be drawn against the liberties of his 
fellow citizens." 

On July 26th, 1823, we also learn that the East Dereham Yeomanry 
Cavalry, commanded by Capt. E. Wodehouse, and the South Erpingham 
and Eynesford Yeomanry, commanded by Capt. Wymer, were inspected at 
Bylaugh by his Majesty's Lieutenant of the County, who was pleased to 
express himself satisfied with their appearance. 

About the same date, the Norfolk Rangers, under the command of 
Major Lord James Townshend, were inspected at Fakenham, by the Hon. 
John Wodehouse, his Majesty's Lieutenant for the County. 



2i8 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1823. 





Norfolk Rangers: 1823. 


Major 


Lord James Townshend 




I8T TROOP 


Captain 


Charles Loftus 


Lieut 


John Whiteman 


Cornet 


John Billing 


Qr. Master 


John Stibbard 


27 rank and file 






2ND TROOP 


Captain 


Edward Dewing 


Lieut 


Jennis Diggings 


Cornet 


Thomas Wiseman 


Surgeon 


Edward Rudge 


Qr. Master 


Edward Case 


30 rank and file 






DOWNHAll TROOP 


Captain 


William Say 


Lieut 


Edward R. Pratt 


Comet 


John Barsham 


Qr. Master 


William Oakes 


44 rank and file 






8WAFFHAM TROOP 


Captain 


Philip Hamond 


Lieut 


R. Caldwell 


Cornet 




Qr. Master 


M. Rust 


39 rank and file 





Total for the corps 13 officers 

4 quartermasters 
140 rank and file. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1823. 219 

Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1823. 

Lt-Colonel Robert Wilson 28 Sept 1823 

Major William Lee 28 Sept 1823 

Adjutant 

1ST DEREHAM TROOP 

■ 

Captain Edmund Wodehouse 

Lieut. John Marcon 

Cornet 

Qr. Master Thomas Crafer 
32 rank and file 

2ND DEREHAM TROOP 

Captain Edmund Wodehouse 

Lieut. John Marcon 

Cornet 

Qr. Master John Wells 
31 rank and file 

SOUTH GREENHOE TROOP 

Captain Robert Wilson (Lt-Col.) 

Lieut Thomas Harvey 

Cornet 

Qr. Master Francis Beales 

22 rank and file 

HINGHAM TROOP 

Captain Hon. Philip Wodehouse 

Lieut Thomas Coningsby Watson 

Comet 

Qr. Master Thomas Rose 

23 rank and file 

CLACKCLOSB TROOP 

Captain William Lee (Major) 

Lieut James Lee 

Cornet John Lister 

Qr. Master Joseph Tombleson 
38 rank and file 

SOUTH BRPINGHAM AND EYNE8FORD TROOP 

Captain George Wymer 

Lieut Thomas Partridge 

Comet John Varlo Wymer 

Qr. Master Richard Burch 
45 rank and file 

Total for corps 14 officers 

6 quartermasters 
191 rank and file. 



220 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1823. 

Third or East Regiment op Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1823. 

Lt-Colonel John Harvey 

Major Anthony Hudson 

Adjutant Rc^er Hayes 

Su^eon Henry Carter 



BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WAL8HAM TROOP 



Captain 


Henry Negus Burroughes 


Lieut 


William Jary 


Comet 


Thomas Tuck 


Qr. Master 


C. G. Rope 


29 rank and file 






WYMONDHAM TROOP 


Captain 


John Darell 


Lieut 


Thomas Utting 


Comet 


William Clarke 


Qr. Master 


Benjamin Parsons 


30 rank and file 






LODDON TROOP 


Captain 


John Winn Gooch 


Lieut 


Thomas Drake 


Cornet 


John Creasy 


Qr. Master 


Charles Chalker 


31 rank and file 






TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TR 


Captain 
Lieut. 






Cornet 


Hadden Browne 


Qr. Master 


William Rayner 


24 rank and file 






NORWICH LIGHT HORSE SQUAI 


Major 


Anthony Hudson 


Captain 


Samuel Mitchell 


Lieut. 


Richard Day Squire 


f» 


George Harvey 


Cornet 


Robert Richards 


Qr. Master 


Samuel Barnes 


»• 


T^ionel Gowing 


70 rank and file 





The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1823-24. 221 





YARMOUTH SQUADRON 


Captain 


Sir Edmund K. Lacon, Bart 


Lieut 


Matthew Gunthorpe 


Cornet 


James Green 


19 


Charles Cubitt 


Qr. Master 


Richard Ferrier 


jj rank and file 





This gives a total for this regiment of 22 officers 

7 quartermasters 
260 rank and file 

Total yeomanry for the county per the returns 48 officers 

15 quartermasters 
581 rank and file. 



1824. 

We learn from the Norfolk Chronicle of June. 5th, 1824, that *'the 
3rd Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by Lieut. 
Colonel John Harvey, has been on permanent duty this week; and the 
R^ment, consisting of the Norwich squadron, the Blofield and South 
Walsham, the Tunstead and Happing, and the Wymondham troops, were 
inspected and reviewed by Major Deare of the 8th Hussars at Sprowston. 
Colonel Harvey afterwards gave a handsome dinner to the Inspecting 
Officer and the Regiment at the Maids Head Inn. 

"The same week the Yarmouth Yeomanry cavalry, commanded by 
Sir E. K. Lacon Bart on the last day of their permanent duty, were 
inspected by Major Deare of the 8th Hussars. During the time of 
inspection, the Major frequently expressed to a gentleman who accom- 
panied him, his approbation of the manner in which the corps performed 
its evolutions and that he had not seen, any yeomanry troop superior 
to it in the county. On visiting the store room etc; he paid a well 
merited compliment to Capt Sir E. K Lacon, on the complete equipment, 
good discipline, and effective state of the corps. Immediately after the 
inspection, the gallant Major set off for Halesworth, to inspect the Suffolk 
troops of Yeomanry ; and in the afternoon, Sir El. K. Lacon, gave a 
dinner to the members of the troop, at the Angel Inn, which was 
served up by Mr. Roe, the landlord, in his usual good style." 



222 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1824. 





Norfolk Rangers: 1824. 




Major Com'* 


Lord James Townshend 

1ST TROOP 


... Aug 1822 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

Surgeon 

Qr. Master 

27 rank and file 


Charles Loftus 
John Whiteman 
John Billing 
Edward Rudge 
John Stibbard 


II Nov 1822 
14 Aug 181S 
19 Sept 1818 






2MD TROOP 




Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

Qr. Master 

28 rank and file 


Edward Dewing 
Jennis Diggings 
Thomas Wiseman 
Edward Case 




20 Feb 1817 
24 Nov 1822 




DOWNHAM TROOP 




Captain 
Lieut 


William Say 


25 July 1816 


Cornet 

Qr. Master 

42 rank and file 


John Barsham 
William Oakes 

SWAFFHAM TROOP 


25 July 1816 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cnmet 


Philip Hamond 
R. Caldwell 





Qr. Master Michael Rust 

36 rank and file 

Total for corps — 12 officers 

4 quartermasters 
133 rank and file. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1824. 



223 



Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1824. 

Lt-Colonel Robert Wilson 
Major William Lee 
Adjutant 

I8T DEREHAM TROOP 

Captain Edmund Wodehouse 

Lieut. 

Cornet 

22 rank and file 

3ND DBREHAM TROOP 

Captain Edmund Wodehouse 

Lieut 

Cornet ...., 

Qr. Master John Wells 
26 rank and file 

SOUTH GREENHOB TROOP 

Captain Robert Wilson (Lt Col) 

Lieut Thomas Harvey 

Comet 

Qr. Master Francis Beales 
18 rank and file 

RINOHAM TROOP 

Captain Hon. Philip Wodehouse 

Lieut. Thomas Coningsby Watson 

Cornet Thomas Rose 

Qr. Master Thomas Neve 
18 rank and file 

SOUTH BRPINGHAM AND BYNE8PORD TROOP 

Captain George Wymer 

Lieut Thomas Partridge 

Cornet John Varlo Wymer 

Qr. Master Richard Burch 
35 rank and file 

CLACKCLO8E TROOP 

Captain William Lee (Major) 

Lieut James Lee 

Cornet John Lister 

Qr. Master Joseph Tombleson 
38 rank and file 

Total of corps per the returns are 1 3 officers 

S quartermasters 
1 57 rank and file 



224 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1824, 



Third or East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1824. 

Lieut-Colonel John Harvey 
Major Anthony Hudson 

Adjutant Roger Hayes 



Captain 
Lieut 
Comet 
Qr. Master 
32 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

27 rank and file 

Captain 
Lieut. 
Coraet 
Qr. Master 
19 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

19 rank and file 

Captain 

n 

Lieut 

If 
Cornet 

n 

Qr. Master 

64 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Qr. Master 

31 rank and file 



BLOFIELD AND SOUTH WALSHAM TBOOP 

Henry Negus Burroughes 
William Jary 
Thomas Tuck 
C G. Rope 

LODDON TROOP 

John Winn Gooch 
Thomas Drake 
John Creasy 

TUN8TEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 

Henry Wodehouse 
D. B. Scott 
Thomas H Browne 
William Rayner 

WYMONDHAM TROOP 

John Darell 
Thomas Utting 
William Clarke 

YARMOUTH SQUADRON 

Sir Edmund K. Lacon, Bart. 
Matthew Gunthorpe 
James Green 
Charles Cubitt 
Richard Ferrier 
Isaac Preston, jun. 
Samuel Waters 
Thomas Hammond 

NORWICH 1ST TROOP 

Anthony Hudson, major 
George Harvey 
Samuel Barnes 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1824-25. 225 



Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

Qr. Master 

29 rank and file 



NOBWICH 2ND TROOP 

Samuel Mitchell 
Roger Kerrison Harvey 
Robert Richards 
Lionel Gowing 



Total of 24 officers, 5 quartermasters, 221 rank and file 

Total of yeomanry in the county of Norfolk per the returns — 

44 officers 
13 quartermasters 
473 rank and file 





Norfolk Rangers: 1825. 


1825. 


Major Comr. 


Lord James Townshend 

ZST TROOP 


... Aug 1822 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

Surgeon 

26 rank and file 


Charles Loftus 
John Whiteman 
John Billing 
Edward Rudge 


II Nov 1822 
14 Aug 1815 
19 Sept 1818 






9ND TROOP 




Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

26 rank and file 


Edward Dewing 
Jennis Diggings 
Thomas Wiseman 




20 Feb 1817 
24 Nov 1822 




DOWNHAM TROOP 




Captain 

Cornet 

Qr. Master 

38 rank and file 


William Say 
John Barsham 
William Oakes 


25 July 1816 



Total for corps 10 officers 

91 rank and file 



226 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1825. 



Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1825. 



Lieut-Colonel 


Robert Wilson 


Major 


William Lee 


Adjutant 


Richd Money 


Surgeon 


Peter Elvin Williams 




CLACKCXjOSB tboop 


Major 


William Lee 


Lieut 


James Lee 


Cornet 


John Lister 


28 rank and file 






DEREHAM TROOP 


Captain 


Edmond Wodehouse 


Lieut: 




Comet 




43 rank and file 





SOUTH GREENHOB TROOP 

Capt and Lt-Col. Robert Wilson 

Lieut Thomas Harvey 

Cornet 

17 rank and file 

SOUTH ERPINQHAM AND EYNE8FORD TROOP 

Captain Greorge Wymer 

Lieut Thomas Partridge 

Cornet John Varlo Wymer 
35 rank and file 

HINGHAM TROOP 

Hon. Philip Wodehouse 
Thos. Coningsby Watson 
Thomas Rose 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 



28 Sept 1823 



i» 



n 



fi 



5 Sept 1818 
17 April 1814 

28 Sept 1823 

24 May 1808 

12 Oct 1812 



14 July 1813 



28 Sept 1823 
23 July 1803 



3 July 1813 

24 Jan 1 8 14 

17 April 1814 



28 Sept 1823 

26 Sept 1818 

17 Jan 1824 



Total for this corps as per returns is 11 officers 

113 rank and file 

Third or East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1823. 

Lieut-Colonel John Harvey 24 March 1823 

Major Anthony Hudson ^ ,, „ 

Adjutant Thomas Beckham 18 April 1825 





BLOFIBLD TROOP 




Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

28 rank and file 


Henry Negus Burroughes 
William Jary 
Thomas Tuck 


13 June 1816 

8 July 1816 

23 March 1823 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1825. 



227 



64 rank and file 

Total for corps per returns — 22 officers 

202 rank and file 





LODDON TROOP 




Captain 


John Winn Gooch 


24 Dec 1 8 16 


Lieut 


Thos. Utting 


25 April 1808 


Cornet 


John Creasey 


16 Dec 1823 


17 rank and file 


TUNSTEAD AND HAPPINO TROOP 




Captain 


Henry Wodehouse 


29 April 1823 


Lieut 


Thomas Haddon Browne 


1824 


Cornet 






21 rank and file 


NORWICH 1ST TROOP 




Captain 


John Darell 


25 July 1806 


Lieut 


George Harvey 


7 Dec 1816 


Comet 


Robert Richards 


22 March 1822 


» 


William Clarke 


12 March 1812 


35 rank and file 


NORWICH 2ND TROOP 




Captain 


Samuel Mitchell 


14 July 1807 


Lieut 


Roger Kerrison Harvey 


29 April 1823 


Comet 


William Harper 


19 Feb 1825 


36 rank and file 


WYMONDHAM TROOP 




No returns 


YARMOUTH SQUADRON 




Captain 


Sir Edmund K. Lacon, Bt 


17 June 1803 


)» 


Matthew Gunthorpe 


21 June 1819 


Lieut 


James Green 


10 Jan 1824 


II 


Charles Cubitt 


i> ti » 


Cornet 


Richard Ferrier, jun. 


10 Jan 1824 


II 


Isaac Preston, jun. 


»> •» >i 



Total for the whole county is 43 officers 

406 rank and file 



228 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1826. 



1826. 
The following notice appears in Norfolk Chronick, May 6th, 1826 : — 

" Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. 

''The Lieutenant of the county has appointed the following days and 
places for the inspection of the several corps of Yeomanry cavalry, by a 
Field officer of his Majesty's regular forces ; viz. 

'' Downham cavalry, Friday 12th of May at Downham. 
"Second regiment Monday isth of May at East Dereham. 
^ First regiment of Norfolk Rangera Tuesday i6th of May at Fakenham. 
*' Third r^ment Friday 19th of May at Norwich. 
^ Yarmouth cavalry. Monday 22nd of May at Yarmouth. 
" Each inspection to take place at eleven oclock in the forenoon of the 
above days. 

** By command of his Majestys Lieutenant. 
"FENNELL 

'' clerk of the general meetings. 
« Aylsham 2Sth April 1826." 



Norfolk Chronicle, May 13th, 1826: — 

^ The corps of the Norfolk Rangers Cavalry are requested to meet in the 

Fakenham market place, on Monday the 15th of May at eleven oclock, and on 

Tuesday the 16th of May at half past nine oclock, as the corps will be 

inspected on Tuesday, by a field officer of his Majesty's forces ; it is requested 

all members will appear in complete marching order. 

" James Townshend, Major. 
**May 13th 1826." 



"The Loddon, the two troops of Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, and the 
Tunstead and Happing troop of the Third or East Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, 
under the command of Lieut-Col. Harvey, assembled on the Castle meadow 
yesterday, and commenced permanent duty for eight days. 

"They were ultimately inspected by Major Rutledge of the 6th 
Carabineers, at Mile End." 



" The three troops of the 2nd Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry 
marched into East Dereham, where they remained on permanent duty eight 
days. Their soldier-like appearance and excellent equipment reflect great 
credit on that respectable corps. They were reviewed with the Aylsham and 
Dereham troops by Major Rutledge." 



I 



(I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1826. 229 



'* Major Rutledge also reviewed on the South Denes Yarmouth, the 
Yarmouth Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by Sir Edmund Knowles Lacon 
Bart The Major passed a very high encomium upon the troop for their 
soldier like appearance, appointments and discipline." 



The same paper on May 20th, 1826, relates that: *"The wonder, or a 
woman keeps a secret' and the lively little comedy called 'Charles the 
second,' were performed by desire of Lieut-Col. Harvey and the officers and 
privates of the Third or East Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. The house was 
genteely and numerously attended. Between the play and the farce, 'Grod 
save the King' was sung by the whole company and after been warmly 
encored, three cheers were given for their worthy colonel. The band which had 
been lately added to the regiment attended, and played various airs during the 
evening." 

We have already made reference to the great distress which prevailed in 
Norwich in the early days of 1826. The " unemployed " were then en evidence 
and a committee had been formed for the purpose of organizing relief works. 
They met at the Guildhall, on January 30th, and the weavers, who appeared 
to have been the principal sufferers, at the same time held a tumultuous 
assembly in the Market Place. A carrier's cart, laden with weavers' canes 
intended for the use of a manufacturer in the country, was seized and 
destroyed by the mob, who afterwards proceeded to the premises of Mr. J. 
Wright, in St Simon's, and prepared to make an attack upon the factory. 
The Deputy-Mayor, and a number of his friends, opportunely appeared 
upon the scene, and with great difficulty persuaded the crowd to disperse. 
On the next day the disturbances were renewed. Large parties of weavers 
marched through the city, stopped all carriers' carts and public vehicles, 
which they searched for canes and other weaving implements. With the 
same object they entered all public-houses at which carriers set up, and 
wherever manufacturing instruments were found, they were carried away 
in triumph and deposited at the Guildhall. These illegal and disorderly 
proceedings were continued until dusk, when the rioters visited the factories 
of Messrs. Willett and Oxley, Pottergate Street ; of Messrs. BuUimore and 
Hawkins, Magdalen Street ; of Mr. Purdy, Peacock Street ; and Mr. A, 
Beloe, Orford Hill, and broke the whole of the windows in the respective 
buildings. Mr. Beloe, who only a short time previously had been regarded 
by the weavers as their champion when the manufacturers pfoposed to 
effect a reduction in the amount of wages paid in the city, now seemed to 
be the principal object of their resentment, and considerable damage was 
done to his place of business. Between eight and nine o'clock the authorities 



230 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1826. 



thought it their duty to interfere, and accordingly the Deputy-Mayor, 
accompanied by Mr. J. Harvey, Mr. C. Brown, Mr. J. S. Patteson, and 
other magistrates, read the Riot Act, and the mob dispersed. A troop of 
the Scots Greys, who had been summoned from the barracks to protect 
Mr. Beloe's premises, were stationed on Orford Hill, and as an additional 
precaution large numbers of special constables were sworn in. Thus, the 
peace of the city was for a time maintained, but in the following week the 
populace again became turbulent, and the cavalry were called out to disperse 
them. 

Norfolk Rangers: 1826. 

Major Com'- Lord James Townshend ... Aug 1822 

X8T TROOP 

Captain Charles Loftus 11 Nov 1822 

Lieut John Whiteman 14 Aug 1815 

Cornet John Billing 19 Sept 1818 

26 rank and file 

3ND TROOP 

Captain Edward Dewing 

Lieut. Jennis Diggings 20 Feb 181 7 

Comet Thomas Wiseman 24 Nov 1822 
26 rank and file 

DOWNHAM TROOP 

Captain William Say 25 July 18 16 

Lieut. 

Comet John Barsham 25 July 1816 
48 rank and file 

Total for this corps is 9 officers 

100 rank and file 



Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1826. 

Lt.-Colonel Robert Wilson 28 Sept 1823 
Major 



Adjutant 



DEREHAM TROOP 



Captain Hon. George John Milles 

Lieut 

Cornet 

58 rank and file 



L 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1826. 231 



SOUTH ERPINGHAM AND EYNBSFORD TROOP 

Captain Geoige Wymer 3 July 1813 

Lieut Thomas Partridge 24 Jan 18 14 

Cornet John Varlo Wymer 17 April 18 14 

32 rank and file 

SOUTH GRBENHOE TROOP 

Captain & Lt-Gol. Robert Wilson 28 Sept 1823 

12 rank and file 

Total of this corps 5 officers 

102 rank and file 



BIRD OR East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalrv 


: 18 


Lt-Colonel 

Major 

Adjutant 




John Harvey 
Anthony Hudson 
Thomas Beckham 


24 March 

>» If 
18 April 


1823 
1825 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

31 rank and 


file 


BLOFIELD TROOP 

Henry Negus Burroughes 

William Jary 

Thomas D'Eye Burroughes 


13 June 

8 July 

13 May 


1816 
1816 
1826 


Captain 
Lieut 


file 


LODDON TROOP 

John Winn Gooch 


24 Dec 


1816 


Comet 

20 rank and 


John Creasy 


16 Dec 


1823 


Captain 
Lieut. 


file 


1ST NORWICH TROOP 

George Harvey 
Robert Richards 
Roger Kerrison 










Cornet 






40 rank and 






Captain 
Lieut 


file 


9ND NORWICH TROOP 

Roger Kerrison Harvey 
William S. Millard 










Cornet 






40 rank and 








Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


file 


TUNSTEAD AND HAPPING TROOP 

Edward Cubitt 

Thomas Haddon Browne 








1824 


19 rank and 









232 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry oj Norfolk, 1826-27. 



i 









YARMOUTH SQUADRON 






Captain 






Sir Edmund K. Lacon, Bart 


17 June 


1803 


•» 






Matthew Gunthorpe 


21 June 


I819 


Lieut. 






James Green 


10 Jan 


1824 


f) 






Charles Cubitt 


V* n 


n 


Comet 






Richard Ferrier 


n 91 


fi 


M 






Isaac Preston, jun. 


}» 91 


>t 


81 rank 


and 


file 









Total for this corps per return is 20 officers 

231 rank and file 

Total for the whole county per returns is 34 officers 

433 rank and file. 



1827. 
Norfolk Chronicli, March 24th, 1827. 

''At the assizes for this county, which commence at Thetford on 
Monday next, before Mr. Justice Gazalee, there are 65 prisoners for 
trial; they were removed from the castle on Thursday last under an 
escort of Yeomanry cavalry to Thetford." 

In the Norwich Mercury, June i6th, 1827, we read that : — 

''At the hour we were about to put our paper to press last week, 
the city was disturbed by scenes not only most disgraceful but of the 
most brutal and cowardly nature. These tumults arose from the late riots 
which were recorded in our paper of June 2nd as having taken place at 
Ashwelthorpe, where a large body of weavers had assembled and destroyed 
the work, and looms of two masters, Messrs Whitehand and Goodram, who 
were known to have given out work at lower prices than that lately 
agreed upon by the masters of the city. Twenty one persons were 
apprehended the day after, and admitted to bail by the Magistrates to 
appear on Friday sen'night at the County Gaol in the City for final 
examination ; to the whole body of weavers, the affair was of no slight 
interest On Friday as appointed, the accused surrendered themselves at 
the gaol, and some of the witnesses were examined. Three or four of the 
latter however who came walking quietly from their homes, were assailed 
with most fiendish violence on their entrance to the city. 

" One man was met by a body of men upon Orford Hill, near Messrs 
Tompson's Bank and was so dreadfully beaten as to be obliged to be 
conveyed to the Hospital. A gentleman in the bank rushed out to his 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 233 



assistance, but was immediately struck down, another man was assailed 
near Crook's Place, his clothes torn off his back, he was jumped upon, 
very much beaten and otherwise mal-treated A third suffered from ill 
usage in St Stephen's Street Mr. Johnson the Surgeon happened to ride 
up at the time the mob were beating the man near Crook's Place, he 
remonstrated with them, but to no effect, they only seemed to turn their 
fury upon him, upon which he immediately rode to the Mayor and gave 
information of what was going on. The rioters proceeded to the length of 
stripping everything off two of the witnesses, except their trousers, and in 
this state drove them for some distance on the road towards their rebidences. 

*' A large body of persons in the course of the afternoon assembled in 
the Castle Meadow and it was thought necessary by the Magistrates to 
call in the aid of a body of Lancers for the protection of the witnesses, 
who had been able to give their testimony. The final examination was 
therefore postponed to Tuesday last, and the accused dismissed upon giving 
good security for their appearance. As the witnesses left the Castle with 
the Lancers, both were severely pelted by the mob, but no further damage 
insued. 

" On Tuesday morning by ten o'clock the weavers had assembled upon 
the Hill to the number perhaps of three or four hundred, and the 
defendants were in waiting, to surrender themselves at the time appointed 
for the examination. The witnesses it had been arranged were to leave 
Ashwelthorpe under the protection of the Hon. Capt Irby and assistants, 
so as to arrive at Harford Bridges in sufficient time to be at the gaol by 
eleven o'clock. To this place a party of Lancers were sent to escort 
them into the city. However, eleven, twelve, one o'clock came, and no 
witnesses made their appearance. During this time the numbers upon the 
lower part of the Hill were gradually increasing, and every now and then 
when a cry was raised that the witnesses and Lancers were approaching a 
dense mass of people instantaneously rushed before the opening against the 
Golden Ball where they were expected to enter. 

" About half past one, Alderman Francis rode at a brisk rate across the 
lower part of the Hill, and in a very short time a body of about forty 
Lancers were seen in the distance moving along Thorpe Road, apparently 
in the direction of Carrow Bridge. While these circumstances were taking 
place in the city, we were given to understand that the delay of the 
witnesses were occasioned by their refusing to proceed until a body of 
Lancers were sent for to escort them the entire distance. The Chief 
Constable therefore rode forward, and the troops at Harford Bridge 
accompanied them back, who on their return were met by the larger body, 
with Alderman Francis at their Head. About half past two the whole 



234 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 



entered the city, and were proceeding to the opening of the Golden Ball, 
when they found a large Waggon had been drawn across the entrance, 
which was thus blocked up. 

'*The troops were received by a thick shower of stones and finding 
therefore they could not effect an entrance, the Hackney Coaches with the 
witnesses were ordered upon Scoles Green, within a hundred yards of the 
Hill and the troops were immediately dispersed, so as to guard every 
outlet, until the decision of the Magistrates could be obtained. Alderman 
Francis, with the commanding officer, and a guard rode up to the Hall, 
where they met Aldermen Robberds and Yallop, who summoned a large 
body of respectable inhabitants as special constables, and at five o'clock 
Sheriff Bennett and Alderman Francis, and a body of Constables proceeded 
to the Hill, where the Riot Act was read by the worthy Alderman, who 
several times cautioned the persons assembled to disperse. 

" As the party returned, they were assailed, particularly the Alderman 
with a shower of stones, which struck him with some force, but happily 
without much injury. During the whole of this time (nearly three hours) 
the numbers continued to increase and particularly during the whole 
of the last hour. At six, (being the termination of the hour allowed 
by law in cases of riot, for the departure of the rioters), Mr. Sheriff 
Bennett, with his posse comitatus moved towards the blockaded entrance 
amid a shower of stones, at the instant about forty of the Lancers moved 
from their position along the Golden Ball Lane alone, and down St John's 
Timber Hill Street to the opening from Orford Hill upon the Castle 
Ditches, from whence they immediately charged up to the Castle Gate 
and so quickly dispersed themselves over every part of that large area. 
In an inconceivable short time the whole was cleared, but not without 
several sabre cuts being inflicted on the heads of some of the mob. One 
man was wounded in the leg by a pistol shot, as he was running away, 
having been marked throwing stones, at the Lancers, and a few received 
slight Lance wounds. The waggons were then immediately moved away 
by the Constables, and the Avenues guarded to prevent the ingress of the 
rioters, the coaches escorted by the Lancers, then drove at a full gallop 
up to the Castle where the witnesses alighted at last in perfect safety. 
About forty of the Lancers then moved off, leaving eleven to keep the 
mob from assembling. This party every quarter of an hour suddenly 
dispersed the people over various parts of the Hill, who as quickly 
reappeared immediately on their backs being turned thus constantly 
keeping alive the excitation without effecting any good purpose as none of 
the outlets of the Hill were guarded, the mob after having been driven 
from one direction could with facility return by another. Between eight 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1827. 235 



and nine the Staff of the West Norfolk Militia marched up to the Hill 
and took their station before the Castle door, with muskets loaded and 
bayonets fixed. About half past nine or near ten o'clock, Mr. Alderman 
Francis left the Hill, and was followed in considerable numbers by the 
mob evidently under greatly irritated feelings, but he reached his house at 
Carlton without further molestation. Two of the Lancers were thrown by 
the slipping of their horses. One of them received rather a severe flesh 
wound in the leg by accident, very few of them escaped without bruises 
from stones. And the pistol of one, whilst loading, went off upon the 
half cock, and the ball lodged near the elbow joint, but was directly 
extracted by Mr. F. Mills, who was summoned to his assistance. The 
Yeomanry were called out and came upon the Hill just as the Lancers 
charged, bnt were not required to act After a considerable time had 
elapsed it was determined that the witnesses should remain in the Castle 
during the night to be ready for examination the following morning. 
Having plainly detailed the transactions which took place, we cannot, nor 
ought we to suffer them to pass without noticing the general good conduct 
of the soldiers during the whole riot, notwithstanding the treatment they 
experienced. 

''We are fully anxious to do ample justice both to troops and to 
Alderman Francis and Sheriff Bennett who greatly exerted themselves at 
the hazard of considerable personal danger. We are at all times most 
unwilling to see the soldiery brought against the people, but in the present 
instance, the attack was of so apparently systematic a kind, and the 
intention of the rioters had been so openly displayed on the Friday 
previous as to put any doubt of the evil desigpis of some of the persons 
assembled beyond a question. It is on this occasion therefore, rather to 
be regretted that strong measures were not earlier resorted to. 

** To the Weavers we also would address a few words ; to the great 
body of these Artisans, the brutal and cowardly proceedings of Friday 
sen'night, must be a matter of sorrow, no less than the tumult of Tuesday. 
Such conduct can never in any case be sanctioned by the generous or by 
the honest Whether or not the masters were acting rightly in paying a 
lower rate of wages, does not in the least concern the present question ; 
but whether it does or does not, the rioters most unquestionably acted 
contrary to the law in destroying the property of these masters. If then 
these rioters did commit an illegal act, it was proper that they should 
suffer the punishment the law inflicts. It could not answer any one good 
purpose to attack and ill-treat the persons summoned as witnesses, on the 
contrary, it not only showed a wish on the part of the friends of the 
defendants to defeat the ends of justice, but went far towards strengthening 



236 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 



the accusations against them, inasmuch as it demonstrated a fear on their 
part lest the witnesses should identify the defendants. 

''In conclusion we can but state our regret that any body of our 
fellow citizens should have been guilty of the outrages we have mentioned, 
at a time when after having well behaved themselves through other severe 
trials, they are either suffering from the want of work or privation. 

" On Wednesday the staff of Militia kept guard at the Castle Gate and 
about fifty persons assembled on the Hill. In the afternoon the Yeomanry 
escorted the witnesses to their homes without any further disturbance On 
Wednesday last was committed to the Castle by the Hon. F. P. Irby, 
£. Burroughes and John Patteson Esquires, — Benj. Gay, Robt Gooding, 
John Bailey and John Jackson for maliciously and feloniously breaking 
into, and entering by force, the shop and buildings of Thos. Goodram, and 
James Whitehand of Ashwelthorpe, and for destroying a silk winding 
machine, a warping mill, about seventeen looms etc etc. beloi^ing thereto, 
also cutting and damaging a considerable quantity of yam and Silk and 
several pieces of Bombasines and crapea And by the same magistrates, 
W. Foulsham, J. Howes, Owen Bunn, Ishmael Poll, R. Nelson, Charlotte 
Squires, James Blazey, G Kett, G. Tipple, G. Barnard and R. Blyth were 
severally admitted to bail until next Assizes to answer to a charge of riot 
and misdemeanour to be then prepared against them." 



The attention of his Majesty's Government was, about this time, particularly 
directed, amongst other measures of economy, to the expense of keeping on 
foot such of the corps of Yeomanry Cavalry as had not been called on duty for 
some time. It was determined also to discontinue the allowance made by 
Government towards the expenses of the corps of Yeomanry, leaving it for the 
gentlemen of the corps to decide upon continuing the services of the various 
regiments, in case it should be found practicable to maintain its eflSciency 
without such allowance. 



Norfolk ChronicUf December 22nd, 1827, states : — 

"We understand that not more than nine corps of Yeomanry Cavalry 
will be allowed to continue their services . . . amongst these are the 
Buckinghamshire and Somersetshire regiments and some others, in England 
and Scotland. All the corps in Norfolk (including the Norwich Light Horse 
Volunteers) and the whole of the Yeomanry Cavalry in Suffolk, are released 
from their engagements and no allowance will be issued for their maintenance 
after the 24th inst 



L 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1827. 237 



Norfolk Chronicle, December 29th, 1827, states: — 

"Yeomanry Cavalry. 

'* We are authorised to insert the following copy of a letter addressed by 
Lieut-Col. Harvey commanding the third regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry 
Cavalry, to the Marquis of Lansdowne, Secretary of State, and the answer 
thereto from Mr Spring Rice, the under Secretary of the Home Department 



" London. Sunday, i6th Dec : 1827. 

'* My Lord, 

'* in consequence of the unanimous resolution of the Magistrates 
assembled at the late Quarter Sessions of the city of Norwich, transmitted to 
your Lordship ; expressing their earnest wish that the third or East Norfolk 
regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry may not be disbanded, I now take the liberty 
of addressing your Lordship, having had the honour of commanding that 
corps for many years, and being consequently enabled to state the grounds 
on which that resolution was founded. The services of the regiment have 
been frequently called for by the magistrates of the county of Norfolk, as 
well as of the city of Norwich, and a reference to the War Department will 
show many occasions prior to this year, in which it has performed the 
duty required, with the prompt aid and assistance given to the civil power of 
the county. In addition to these instances of its readiness to act whenever 
the appearance of tumult or riot warranted the magistrates to apply for their 
support, I could state many others, when by their mere appearance they 
have prevented the assemblage of persons in such numbers as would, in 
all probability, have terminated in riot ; which, however I deemed not of 
sufficient importance to report to the War Office, to found a claim for the 
customary remuneration. To these services I can subjoin those of the present 
year, one of which, your Lordship will not fail to observe, was indispensable, 
being in obedience to the requisition of the High Sheriff and county 
magistrates, for escorting the prisoners from Norwich to Thetford, and 
guarding them there and back again to the Castle of Norwich, a distance 
of 60 miles ; it being apprehended that a rescue would be attempted by the 
numerous confederates of the men convicted of riotously and tumultuously 
assembling, and of offences connected with such misdeamours ; the documents 
of these particular services are, I have no doubt in the War Department On 
the 1 2th of June, the regiment was likewise on duty two days at the requisition 
of the Hon Capt Irby, and the Revd F. Burroughs, magistrate of the county, 
and eight days permanent duty in October last. I trust that your Lordship 
will excuse my drawing the attention of His Majestys Government to the 
peculiar circumstances of the district in which this corps is placed. 



238 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 



" The city of Norwich is the centre of a large and populous circle of 
country. The city alone by the late census in 1822 contained 50,288 
inhabitants, being an increase of upwards of IJ^OCX)^ above the census of 
18 1 1, and the population now exceeds 60,000, the greater proportion of this 
population are employed in the silk and worstead manufactory, and I may 
venture to assure your Lordship, that nearly half of the population of the 
surrounding country is supported by the same employment I now leave 
to your Lordships consideration what are the benefits which the country may 
derive from the services of such a corps of Yeomanry, always ready to assemble 
and to act at the requisition of the civil power. 

"^ I have the honour to be 
- My Lord 
'* your Lordships obedient and humble servant 
"JOHN HARVEY, Ueut Colonel" 



" Whitehall 17th Dec 1827 
"Sir, 

** I am directed by the Marquis of Lansdowne to acknowledge the 
receipt of your letter of the i6th inst, and to assure you that in the resolution 
adopted by the Kings Government of carrying into effect a reduction of the 
Yeomanry Cavalry including the 3rd Norfolk R^ment, his Lordship is 
perfectly sensible of the zeal and services of that most respectable corps, 
both officers and men ; but adverting to the fact that the Barracks of Norwich 
are at present, and are likely to continue as a station for regular cavalry, the 
Marquis of Lansdowne cannot accede to your request of continuing the pay 
and allowances to the 3rd Norfolk regiment beyond the term referred to in his 
Lordships circular letter to the Lieutenant of the county. Should the 
circumstances of the county alter so as to render the services of the 
respectable individuals who form the 3rd Norfolk Raiment necessary, 
their past zeal and public spirit afford a full security for their readiness 
again to act 

" To Lieut Colonel Harvey. 
" Thorpe Lodge 
•* Nr Norwich." 



The last return of the Norfolk Yeomanry for this period is 31st March, 
1827; the following year they were disbanded. 

I therefore give them as they appear for the last time in this period 
of their history. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 



239 





Norfolk Rangers: 1827. 




Major com'- 


Lord James Townshend 

I8T TROOP 


... Aug 1822 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 


Charles Loftus 
John Whiteman 
John Billing 


II Nov 1822 
14 Aug 181 5 
19 Sept 1818 


t 


2ND TROOP 




Captain 


Edward Dewing 
Jennis Diggings 
Thomas Wiseman 




Lieut 
Comet 


20 Feb 1817 
24 Nov 1822 




DOWNHAM TROOP 




Captain 
Cornet 


William Say 
John Barsham 


2S July 1816 
25 July 1816 



Total for this corps on disbandment was 9 officers 

100 rank and file 



Second or Midland Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1847. 

Lt-Colonel Robert Wilson 28 Sept 1823 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 



DERBHAM TROOP 

Hon. George John Milles 



SOUTH ERPIMGHAM AMD ETNESFORD TROOP 



George Wymer 
Thomas Partridge 
John Varlo Wymer 



SOUTH GREEMHOE TROOP 

Captain & Lt.-CoL Robert Wilson 

Lieut 

Comet 



3 July 1813 

24 Jan 1 8 14 

17 April 1 8 14 

28 Sept 1823 



Total for this corps on disbandment was 5 officers 

102 rank and file 



240 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1827. 

Third or East Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1827. 

Lieut-Colonel John Harvey 24 March 1823 

Major Anthony Hudson ^ „ ^ 

Adjutant Thomas Beckham 18 April 1825 

BLOPIBLD TBOOP 

Captain Henry Negus Burroughes 13 June 18 16 

Lieut William Jary 8 July 1816 

Comet Thomas D'Eye Burroughes 13 May 1826 

LODDON TROOP 

Captain John Winn Gooch 24 Dec 1816 

Lieut 

Comet John Creasy 16 Dec 1823 

ZST NORWICH TROOP 

Captain George Harvey 

Lieut Robert Richards 

Comet Roger Kerrison 

aMD NORWICH TROOP 

Captain Roger Kerrison Harvey 

Lieut William S. Millard 

Comet 

TUN8TBAD AND HAPPINO TROOP 

Captain Edward Cubitt 

Lieut Thomas Haddon Browne 1 824 

Comet 

YARMOUTH SQUADRON 

Captain Sir Edmund K Lacon, Bt 17 June 1803 

M Matthew Gunthorpe 21 June 18 19 

Lieut James Grreen 10 Jan 1824 

H Charles Cubitt » m >f 

Comet Richard Ferrier n n » 

„ Isaac Preston, jun. „ „ „ 

Total for this corps on disbandment was 20 officers 

231 rank and file 

Total Yeomanry in the county on disbandment was 34 officers 

433 rank and file 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1828. 24! 



The following letters came into the writer's possession, and throw a 
few curious sidelights into the final winding-up of the Yeomanry corps. 



1828. 
Halesworth. 9th Jan. 1828. 

Dear Sir, 

I have received letters from the ordnance office and Treasury, 

on the subject of the arms and accounts ; so that I need not give you 

the trouble of corresponding with those departments respecting the first 

troop. With respect to the accounts I have not drawn for a shilling for 

several years, and as I had delivered new cloaks to the troop in the course 

of the last year, and have several accounts unpaid, I shall be very much 

disappointed if I am not to be allowed to draw for the arrears due to me : 

I have been so particularly engaged for the last two or three weeks, that I 

have been unable to attend to this matter and I have to apologise to you 

for having omitted so long to reply to your obliging letter, 

I am dear sir, 

yours faithfully, 

^CRABTREE. Capt 

To 

Lieut-Col. Edgar. 
Red House, 

Ipswich. 



Copy of letter from Col. Edgar to Sir Edmund Lacon, CoL Harvey, & 
to Capt Crabtree respecting the appropriation of the Cavalry appointments. 

Feb. 12. 1828. 
My dear Sir, 

as it is always my custom to ask for advice whenever I am in 
any difficulty, & always my disposition to afford it when asked for; I take 
the liberty of addressing a few lines to you, under the influence of those 
feelings on the subject of the Yeomanry Cavalry appointments, by which of 
course I do not mean sabres, pistols, carbines, canteens & havresacks, all of 
which were furnished by Government, but I mean all the other appointments 
which in my regiment are of considerable value, as you will suppose, when 
I state to you that the jackets cost 6g, the Pantaloons 2£^ the cloaks 2£, 
Helmets 2£ and the saddlery all from Birmingham. Now the difficulty I 
am in, is to come to a determination whether to take all or any part of 
these from the men of the Regt, and convert them to my own emolument 

Q 



242 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1828. 



(having certainly incurred expences which have not been met by the govern- 
ment allowance) or whether I should make a present of part or all of them, 
having at present taken no steps for calling diem in. I shall feel myself 
much obliged by your informing me what your intentions are on this head. 
I have written to Sir Edmund Lacon who had command of the Yarmouth 
Yeomanry Cavalry; and to Col. Harvey who had the command of the 
Norwich Yeomanry Cavalry. 

with every apology for the 

Liberty I have taken, 

&a &c 
To 

Sir Edmund Lacon, 

Capt Crabtree, 

& Col Harvey. 

Capt. Crabtree's reply to CoL Edgar respecting the appropriation of the 
Yeomanry Cavalry appointments. 

Halesworth 14th Feb 1828. 
My dear Sir, 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 12th inst, 
which I am very sorry I was unavoidably prevented from answering by 
return of post. As you do me the honor to ask my opinion upon the subject 
of the saddlery, clothing and appointments belonging to your regiment (& not 
furnished originally by the government), I can do no less than frankly give it 
you, altho with the utn^ost diffidence being perfectly convinced that upon 
such a subject you are much more competent to form a correct judgement than 
myself. As far as r^[ards myself, I have determined on leaving all these 
matters in the possesion of the members of the troop ; for several reasons. 
First that, the requiring them to be delivered up would probably cause a great 
deal of dissatisfaction and complaint ; secondly, that I am not without doubts 
as to our power of compelling the return of these articles ; and thirdly that 
their value would be extremely trifling indeed compared with the original cost, 
and not in the case of any single troop to warrant the unpleasant feeling which 
would attend an order for their delivery. But more than all, I should be 
fearfuly that the members of the troop, who I am sure from me deserve every 
mark of attentive kindness and respect, would consider it as betraying a want 
of delicacy and consideration for them, which I should be most unwilling to 
incur the least suspicion of. This being the view I have formed on the subject, 
I have of course decided on making no claim for the return of any part of the 
appointments of the troop, but such as belong to the government. But I do 
not think that our cases are precisely parallel, nor do I at all presume to 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1828, 243 



say that my view of the question is the correct one ; but such as it is, I take 

the liberty to state it, and I am sure you will not blame me for my candour 

even if you differ from me in my opinion. I should have felt very much 

obliged to our economical Whig friends who are now so happily displaced, if 

they had given me some hint of their intention to dispense with the services of 

the Yeomanry Cavalry. I have been for the last six years incurring 

considerable expenses, and this very last summer, I have incurred a charge 

of £2CO & upwards for new cloaks for the whole troop ; not having for the 

whole of that time drawn for a shilling of the allowance due to the troop, 

which would amount to nearly ;f 1000, and which if the Government refuse to 

pay, I shall consider it wanting in good faith. 

I am dear sir with great respect 

yours very faithfully, 

CRABTREE 

To Lieut Col Edgar. 

Red House. 

Ipswich. 

Col. Harvey's reply to Col. Edgar. 

Thorpe Lodge. 14 Feb 1828. 
My dear Colonel, 

your kind letter of the 12th inst affords me no occasion to apologise 
for giving you my opinion about the conduct to be pursued in the return of 
accoutrements and the various articles from the Ordance Office. As yet, 
I have done nothing, and wait the result of an enquiry which I propose 
to make at the end of this month, at the Home Department and War Office ; 
w^en I shall personally attend for that purpose, and I will not fail to furnish 
you with all the information I obtain. There is no occasion for hurry, it may 
be that the wisdom of the present Government may correct the errors of the 
former, & reinstate this respectable and constitutional force. Your equipment, 
I observe has been more than usually good and handsome 8c you have 
consequently got into the same scrape as myself, the fund being your debtor. 
I have considered it prudent to call in the clothing and arms into stores, to 
wait the event, lest some of the men might imagine that they had a claim 
to keep them. I have been much pressed to endeavour to induce Grovern- 
ment to replace my regiment, and I shall immediately upon my arrival 
in town make the necessary enquiries, of which you shall have a complet 
report 

I am my dear colonel very faithfully yours 
To JOHN HARVEY. 

Lieut-Col. Edgar 
Red House, 

Ipswich. 



244 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1828. 

I III! ■ ^^^^ ■ 1 ■ - -I - I ^^^^^^^^BW IM ■ M - 

Sir Edmund Lacon's reply to Col. Edgar. 

Ormesby. Feb 14th 1828. 
My dear Sir» 

the articles belonging to the Yarmouth Yeomanry Cavalry, viz sabres 
pistols^ belts, & bugles, as stated by the Board of Ordnance to be returned into 
the store at Harwich, I have some time since sent to their place of destination. 
The other appointments I consider as belonging to me, and as I am in advance 
to the corps one hundred pounds, unless I have directions to the contrary, it is 
my intention to dispose of them for my own benefit at least as far as the 
payment of the debt due to me. If there is any surplus, I think as com- 
manding officer, I should not feel inclined to touch it, but take the directions 
of the Secretary of State as to its disposal I received a letter from the War 
Office requesting to know whether any & what balance remained in my hands 
unexpended of the clothing and contingent allowances ; to which I returned 
for answer, ffi7, but that a considerable sum was due to me. If Government 
demand the clothing, I think they must pay us our deficiencies ; in my 
opinion no order to that eflfect will be given, so that we shall be left to act 
in the disposal of the appointments as we think proper. Mine are all delivered 
up & in store. It will give me much pleasure at all times to communicate with 
you upon this or any other subject 

8c believe me, dear sir, 

very truly yrs 

EDMD. K. LACON. 
To 

Lt.-Col. Edgar, 

Red House, 

Ipswich. 

Thorpe Lodge. 20 March 1828. 
My dear Colonel, 

Having made my applications at the Home Department and at the 
War Office for information of the conclusive determination of the Government 
respecting the Yeomanry, I was indulged with a perusal of part of the 
correspondence that had passed between the Colonels of Yeomanry regiments 
& the Minister of the Home Department. The services of all those which 
were directed to be dispersed with, could only be reinstated (& some have 
been) by gratuitous service. Allowances by Grovernment being only granted 
when called out in aid of the civil power. This was definite & the papers 
having been laid before Parliament no other arrangements at present can 
be attended to. Respecting the return of the clothing, I was only told 
that no order had been issued to that effect & it might be rather impolitic 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1828-29. 245 



to make it a question. The application from the Ordnance Office is plain 
& peremptory, and I am now taking measures to comply with it. Everything 
else belonging to the corps I propose to retain. There has been a considerable 
degree of regret & disappointment excited here by this determination, and as 
far as the City of Norwich is affected, I must consider the measure somewhat 
harsh and unpopular. 

I am very faithfully yours 

my dear colonel 

JOHN HARVEY. 
To 

Lt CoU Edgar. 



1829. 
Charles Loftus, in ** My Life," says : — 

** While in Leicestershire, in 1829, 1 received information from Lord James 
Townshend that the yeomanry cavalry of Norfolk had been disbanded, and of 
course, among them, my pet troop of Norfolk Rangers, with the well-being of 
which I had taken so much trouble, and which I had been so interested in 
getting into good order. 

*' It was not, certainly, a very grateful conclusion of all our endeavours and 
exertions in the service of the country to be disbanded ; but, by way of a sop, 
we were told we were to retain our rank." 



Thus disappeared for a few years the Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, after a 
continuous service of twenty-four years. During this period their services had 
been invaluable to the Government, as without their co-operation and the total 
absence of a local police force, it would have been impossible for them to have 
coped successfully with the riotous assemblies which were so prevalent 
throughout the country at this period. 



CHAPTER VI. 

1830 to 1838. 

Riots among Labourers in Norfolk — Reminiscences of 183 1 of Charles Loftus — 
Re-raising of the Norfolk Yeomanry urtder Hon. Milles — Training of 
the Yeomanry at Yarmauth^Training of the Yeomanry at Lynn — Riot 
at Bireham, i8iS — Yeomanry Summoned to Cromer, \ii6-^ResigruUum 
of Lord Sondes, 1838. 

1830. 
Coincident with the accession of William IV. in 1830 was the French 
Revolution, with the dethronement of Charles X., and the Revolution in 
Brussels, which resulted in the separation of Holland and BelgiuoL These 
occurrences gave an immense impetus to the Reform agitation in all parts 
of England, followed, as they were, by the Polish insurrection of the autumn, 
and the end of the year found Earl Grey and the Whigs in power under 
a pledge to secure a large measure of popular control Riots occurred in 
many counties, and the crime of arson greatly increased, and Norfolk was 
not altogether free, especially on its eastern side; there was destruction of 
weaving goods at Saxlingham and elsewhere, and in a letter of December 
1st, reporting that West Norfolk was generally quiet, it was said, however, 
that each parish had a number of special constables sworn in ready for 
emeigendes, as some few of the parishes were in an unsettled state. The 
writer adds: "All west of Dereham by SwafTham, Fakenham, up to Lynn 
is quiet, and I hope and trust we have by activity and conciliation in some 
instances quelled all chance of future riots." The large body of special 
constables it was hoped would be sufficient for emergencies, though troops 
might be needed. Troops were sent to many places in the county, and 
even clergymen had to be protected in their parsonage houses at the time 
of collecting tithes. Colonel Somerset and the men of the ist Royal 
Dragoons were afterwards voted the thanks of the county justices, for the 
alacrity with which they rendered service wherever required. The local 
newspapers of November and December report many cases of incendiarism 
and tumultuous assemblies. At the County Sessions in January, 1831, of 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1830-31. 247 



171 cases for trial, fifty were for machine breaking and such like offences 
and about the same number for riots at Docking, Haddiscoe, Attleborough, 
&c. At one time there were 267 prisoners in the county gaol, 108 of whom 
were charged with breaking thrashing machines, and fifty with rioting. A 
Special Assize was also held at Norwich in March by Mr. Justice Alderson, 
when two men were condemned to death for firing com stacks at Swanton 
Abbot These agricultural disturbances and the prosecution of offenders 
cost the county no less than ;^3,58i. 

1831. 

Referring to these prosecutions, at a meeting of the county magistrates, 
in the following month of March, Colonel John Harvey, of Thorpe, took 
occasion to observe : '* One plain truth I must speak, and I think it my 
duty to say that the great mass of operative labourers in this county are 
ill paid, not kindly treated, but too often neglected and insulted ; and 
have thus been driven to commit these acts of violence, to obtain by force 
what they ought to have had without." 

Later in the year, on the 9th September, we find the Hon. John 
Wodehouse writing to Lord Melbourne, that at Dilham there had been 
threshing machines destroyed, for which three men had been committed for 
trial, but the sympathy of their neighbours caused him to apprehend attempts 
to rescue, and he had sent to Norwich for a detachment of the Royal 
Dragoons. 

November lOth. — On this date began the machine breaking riots and 
stack firing which gradually extended over the greater part of the county. 
The first fire occurred on the farm of Mr. J. Hill, of Briston, and a reward 
of £\fxyo was offered by Sir Jacob Astley for the discovery of the offenders. 
On the i6th a mob destroyed the agricultural machinery belonging to Mr 
John Girling, of Paston. The outrages became so numerous that the principal 
agriculturists got rid of their threshing machines, and Lord Wodehouse, the 
Lord-Lieutenant, issued a circular to the magistrates, requesting them to 
swear in special constables in every parish. 

At Norwich, on the 29th, the mob destroyed the saw-mills of Mr. 
Calver, at New Catton, and the looms at Messrs. Willetts' factory in St. 
Martin's, and broke the windows of the silk factory. The sheriffs and the 
magistrates were in daily and nightly attendance at the Guildhall, and the 
Chelsea pensioners in the city, to the number of two hundred, were called 
out to assist in preserving the peace. 

On December 4th, th^ county of Norfolk was included in his Majesty's 
proclamation, offering a reward of £v> 'n respect of every person convicted 
of any outrage upon property. 



248 The Records of Ike Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1831. 



Mr. John Ensor, of RoUesby Hall, sent a veiy graphic account of the 
state of things in his neighbourhood on the nth November. There had 
just been three fires in neighbouring parishes, which had been witnessed 
''with joy by the labouring classes,'' and yet he was satisfied there was no 
lack of employment in the twenty-two parishes in which he acted as a 
magistrate. Wages were from los. to I2x., "notwithstanding which there 
was a spirit of mischief abroad." There were no threshing machines in 
these parishes to which he referred ; the wheat was chiefly planted by hand 
(called dibbled). Farmers were panic*struck ; constables afraid to act, lest 
in revenge their property should be burnt ; and he apprehended considerable 
danger, quite possibly a servile war. He thought a police, forming a sort 
of national guard, should be organized. 



Charles Loftus, in "My Life by Sea and Land,'* says: — 

" I afterwards resided in Norfolk, at no great distance from Raynham. 
Some of my readers may remember the circumstances which occurred when 
machine breaking took place in that county, the labourers marching about 
in gangs, entering the gentlemen's and farmers' houses, demanding that the 
threshing machines should be given up to them, and breaking them to 

J pieces with sledge hammers. There was not a soldier in Norfolk, all having 
been sent to other counties, where their services were required in the same 
cause. It was then that Lord Wodehouse, Lord-Lieutenant of the county, 
came and asked me if I could muster any of my grandfather the Marquis 
Townshend's corps of the Norfolk Rangers — a corps of about two 
hundred men, which had been raised during the war among his own 
tenantry. I lost no time in carrying out this wish, and soon raised around 
Raynham and StifTkey a body of sixty volunteers, ready to follow me 
anywhere. But alasl we had no arms. I went over to Kimberley, and 
requested Lord Wodehouse to write to the Government, asking for a supply. 
The reply was that three troops must be formed, and that arms would 
then be supplied. This was done, Sir Jacob Astley forming one troop, 
Hon. George John Milles a second, and the third, that raised on the 
Raynham estate, was placed under the command of my cousin and brother 
in law. Lord Charles Townshend, while the Hon. G. J. Milles was appointed 
Major-Commandant. 

"In 1830, soon after the harvest, the newspapers gave accounts of great 
burnings of com stacks in Kent — crimes which were supposed to be the 
work of French people coming to England for the purpose. The labouring 
population of Norfolk and Suffolk were mucH excited, and they met in 

' groups in every village to discuss their grievances, real or imagined. It was 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1831. 249 



supposed by many that emissaries from Kent were doing their mischievous 
work among them, for the Norfolk people, as a body, I always observed to 
be most obliging and obedient to the law. 

** It was in the winter of 1831 that the fires first occurred in Norfolk 
and Suffolk. Scarcely a night passed that we were not roused with the 
alarm of incendiary fires burning in one direction or another, their fearful 
blazes being seen at a g^eat distance, sometimes as far as ten or twelve 
miles, and at other times apparently not more than the distance of two 
miles. I say apparently, for when we mounted our horses, and had gone two 
or more miles, the fire still appeared as distant as at first. As I was 
going to bed one night at half past ten, I was disturbed by a ring at my 
door bell, and when it was opened, I was informed that a \Iarge fire was 
raging in the neighbourhood of Raynham, ten miles distant. I mounted 
my horse, and followed by my groom on another, set off at full gallop. 
Judge of my astonishment when I discovered that stacks of wheat and 
barley were burning only a mile from my house ! On arriving at the spot 
where the fire was raging, I found that the Rev. Mr. Hoste and Dr. Raven, 
of Litcham, had arrived, and that they had collected about twenty or 
thirty labourers, whom Mr. Hoste had formed into a line from the pond 
to the burning ricks. 

^ In this year, 1831, alarming riots took place in various parts of 
England, Wales, and Ireland, particularly Merthyr Tydvil, where several 
people were shot by the military, whom the Government were obliged to 
send out, to restrain the evil and protect the well disposed. In the Forest 
of Dean there was great destruction of property, and the military and 
yeomanry cavalry had to be employed to restrain the riotous mobs. This 
year also the labourers of Norfolk assembled in large bodies, and marched 
to the farm houses, where they demanded that the threshing machines 
should be destroyed, and in many instances their demand was complied 
with. Five hundred rioters at a time went from one village to another, 
proceedings which could not, of course, be permitted to continue. Fires 
were blazing all over the country every night, and no one knew who might 
be next attacked by ill-guided, mistaken men, misled by designing 
scoundrels. 

*' In the midst of this state of things, I received a letter from a 
gentleman residing near me, a magistrate of the county, who occupied 
three or four hundred acres of land, and had received a notice that the 
men were coming to break his thrashing machine, requesting me to bring 
a troop of the Norfolk Rangers. He was born of a noble family, a good 
neighbour, kind to the poor, and employed many people on his farm. 
When I saw him, he showed me the letter he had received, which was to 
the following effect: 



250 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1831. 



" • Sir, 

'* ' Understanding that you have a threshing machine, worked by 
horses, we hereby command you to take it to pieces that you may no 
longer use it In using it, you prevent the honest labourer getting an 
honest living by using the frail. 

"•(Signed) SWING.' 

" I told my friend that if I still had the troop (he had forgotten 
wholly that it was disbanded), I would soon settle the business for him 
but the Whig Government had been so very careful to make up a very 
good budget for Parliament, wishing to show that they could keep the 
country quiet by means of Liberal measures, that they had thought proper 
to disband the Norfolk Rangers, 'which now, you see, as I expected, are 
required.' 

"He then requested me to go and get together all the men that I 
could who had belonged to my old corps. 

" * Very well. But, sir, I have no power to do any such thing. There's 
the 1st Royal Dragoons at Norwich.' 

"'No,' he said, 'they are gone — all but one troop. I inquired for 
them, and I hear that they have been sent for elsewhere.' 

" That statement was quite correct. As far as my memory serves me, 
they had been sent to the neighbourhood of Holt, where Sir Jacob Astley 
also had received threatening notices. The consequence of this absence of 
a military force, at a juncture such as this, was the raising of three troops 
of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, which were placed under the command of 
the Hon. George John Milles, as Major Commandant. One troop was 
raised by Sir Jacob Astley, who was appointed its captain, another by 
Mr. Milles himself; the third I raised on the Raynham estate, consisting 
chiefly of men who had served with me in the old Rangers, who gladly 
came forward the moment they heard that their services were required. 
The troop raised by Mr. Milles, afterwards Lord Sondes, was commanded 
by my brother Frederick, captain on half pay, of the 17th Lancers, and I 
was lieutenant in my troop under Lord Charles Townshend, who was my 
captain. Previous, however, to the formation of this corps, the rioters had 
proceeded to acts of great violence, for it requires a considerable time to 
organise such a body, to get the men together, to clothe and equip them, 
and to receive arms from the Tower. 

"An event occurred which caused some amusement among the 
gentlemen of the hunt at a meet of the hounds at Elmham HalL As we 
were intending to draw the wood for a fox, information was brought that 
about three hundred men were on their way to Melton Hall for the 
purpose of breaking a machine. I think we mustered about twenty-five 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1831. 251 



or thirty gentlemen and farmers, all well mounted. We put the hounds 

into a stable, immediately rode away for Melton, and passing through the 

park, overtook the mob going into Sir Jacobs farmyard. As he came out 

to meet us, he observed these gentry, and desired them to move off his 

property ; but they refused, and declared that they would smash it to 

pieces themselves, accompanying this threat with another refusal to leave 

his grounds. We determined to disperse them. More people coming up 

to join us, we formed into bodies of four or five horsemea Mr Hamond 

of Westacre Hall, who had served as an officer in the Dragoons, Mr 

Milles, who had been in the Blues, and myself, in one of these small 

bodies, led on the charge against the mob, who fled in all directions, some 

falling down to save themselves from the lash of the whip, which descended 

freely among them. I observed a man throw a stone at Mr. Hamond, 

who rode at him as he ran away, and caught him just as he was 

scrambling over a gate, and with his horsewhip adminstered four beautiful 

flankers on his back, which made him roar out most vociferously. After 

this we heard no more of such assemblages, but a threatening letter was 

sent to Sir Jacob Astley, of which he took no notice. In a few days I 

went to Raynham for some shooting. A large party was assembled at the 

Hall. While we were at dinner, there arrived a messenger to say that a 

great mob of machine breakers was gone towards Walsingham. We were 

requested to render any assistance that was in our power, in order to stop 

their disorderly proceedings. The ladies were all in alarm, and hoped the 

mob would not come to the house in our absence. Horses and carriages 

were hauled out. Notices were sent off to the near tenants, who in half 

an hour arrived mounted, some of them armed with the old sabres of the 

Rangers worn by their fathers. Sergeant Bond was among them, wearing 

his Ranger dress, helmet and all I Having ascertained our numbers, we 

rode through the park gates in twos in military order. Col. Sir Edward 

Bowater of the Guards taking the lead, I acting as aide-de-camp, with old 

Diggins' assistance. On passing over Hempton Green, a horseman from 

Sir Jacob Astle/s joined us with a letter, to say that he had gone forward 

with a party from Melton, and would join us at Basham. We trotted 

forward over Hempton Mill Bridge. The night was very dark, the hedges 

very high in the narrow lanes, and we had some difficulty in finding our 

way to the high road to Basham. On drawing near Basham, Col. Bowater 

and I rode forward to reconnoitre. 

"On the top of the hill was Sir Jacob and a large party of his 
tenants, mounted, waiting for us. We trotted on to Walsingham Abbey, 
Mr Lee Warner's seat, where we all drew up in military order, much to 
the astonishment of the old squire, who, roused up at twelve at night, 
was informed of our arrival. They had heard nothing of the rioters, no 



252 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1831. 



more than we had, since we started. On passing Hempton, I sent a man 
to Fakenham for two of our old trumpeters of the Rangers, Samuel 
Tuttell and Jonas Wright, who joined us at Walsingham, and proved very 
useful in collecting our men. We had some coffee and cold meat in 
Mr Lee Warner's hospitable mansion, where we remained till five o'clock 
in the morning. 

'< We heard nothing of the rioters, but that they had been seen on the 
road to Ryburgh, about a hundred strong. It now appeared that hearing 
of our going to Walsingham and remembering the castigation they had 
received before, they thought it most prudent to march home again. Our 
goodly appearance astonished the people, and our mustering in this quick 
military style had a wonderfully good effect all round the country. 

'* I returned with my brothers to London, where there were many 
arrangements to make. On my arrival at home, I received a note from 
the Lord Lieutenant regarding the formation of the Yeomanry Cavalry 
Corps, which some time before was in contemplation. Sir Jacob Astley and 
Mr. Milles having called to consult with me, I went over to Kimberley, and 
the result of that interview was the formation of the corps of three troops. 
I lost no time myself in collecting the men of the Raynham troop. Our 
names having appeared in the Gazette^ we were authorised to commence drill. 
I did not wait for the clothes to be made, feeling that the men could be 
drilled in their own, and with their saddles and bridles as well as with the 
regular accoutrements which were preparing for them in London. All the 
Raynham men, who lived near and those at no great distance, I used to 
assemble in the park, in the evening, twice in the week, so as to get two 
hours drill in the summers evening before it was dark. I had two very 
good non-commissioned officers, who had been sei^ants in the 24th Light 
Dragoons, of which my father was colonel. (He had originally raised that 
regiment, principally of Norfolk men.) As soon as the arms arrived from 
the Tower, they were served out to the men — swords and pistols. But when 
I afterwards became Commandant of the corps, I changed the latter for 
carbines, and in the use of that weapon my men became most expert. I 
knew that men who were constantly using fowling-pieces in a sporting 
county such as Norfolk, would be more au fait with the carbine than the 
sword ; but with the use of the latter I made them fully acquainted. We 
shot for a prize every year, when on permanent duty, and we also had a 
contest for a prize sword. I commenced this plan by giving the first prizes 
in both trials myself. This example was followed afterwards by the captains 
of all the troops, each giving a prize in his turn. "Ay this means great 
excitement and useful interest were created, and the men looked forward 
with anxiety to the annual meeting of the corps. At last the clothing 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1831. 253 



arrived, and when fully equipped the men looked very well. I had, by 
Mr. Milles request, gone to London to choose and order the helmet, which 
I did from the pattern of one I had seen in a French regiment during the 
Peninsular campaign, with black horsehair depending over one side, the 
peak of black leather, edged with brass, fish scales for chains under the chin. 
The mountings of the officers helmets were gilt ; the clothing of all was scarlet, 
with silver epaulettes, and brass scales for officers and men ; the trousers were 
blue, with red stripes, all cut in regular cavalry shape. The Major Com- 
mandant, the Hon. George Milles, had three years allowance advanced for the 
equipment of the corps, at the rate of three pounds per man ; and little 
enough to find everything for a cavalry soldier, as I afterwards found to 
my cost" 

Norfolk Chronicle^ Sept. 24th, 183 1, states:— *' The three corps of Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry raised in the Western part of the county, consisting of the 
first or Melton troop, Capt Sir Jacob Astley, Bart ; the second or West 
Rainham, Capt Lord Charles Townshend ; and third or Elmham, Major 
the Hon. George John Milles, assembled at Lenwade Bridge on Monday 
morning and marched into this city on their way to Yarmouth for six days 
training under the command of Major Milles. The colours were borne by 
Messrs Caldwell, Waller, and Case. The brass band of the ist Royal 
Dragoons, assembled at Stone Hills, and preceded the troops into the city ; 
Lieut. CoL Somerset and several of the officers of the Royals also went 
out to meet the Yeomanry, and rode into the town with the officers of 
the newly embodied corps. The troops marched into the Market Place, 
where they were drawn up and dismissed to their quarters. They are a fine 
body of men and well horsed. The uniform of these corps, consist of a 
red jacket, dark trousers, and black helmets ; the latter are however by no 
means of a becoming shape. The Hon. Major Milles wore his Waterloo 
medal, as an officer who had borne a part in that great and glorious battle. 
The West Rainham troop were assembled in the morning, at Rainham 
where they were most hospitably regaled at the old Hall by Lord Charles 
Townshend, their captain and received their colours from the hands of Lady 
Townshend, through Cornet Caldwell. On Tuesday morning the troops 
mustered on the Castle Ditches at eight o'clock, and proceeded to Yarmouth." 

Charles Loftus, in ''My Life," says — "In 1831, on the morning of our march 
to Great Yarmouth for the eight days permanent duty, my sisters, on horse- 
back in Raynham Park, presented the Raynham troop with the standard — the 
colours blue and crimson, with Tamworth Castle embroidered. On entering 
Norwich, we were hooted by an immense mob, which showed their feeling 
against the military, especially the Yeomanry, who they knew were formed 



254 The Records of the Yeomanry Ccevalry of Norfolk^ 1831, 



in order to assist the civil powers to keep the peace. I, myself, got dreadfully 
abused while riding at the head of my troop. The Officers of the Royal 
Dragoons, then quartered in Norwich, came out, with their band, to meet us. 
After the billets were served out and the men dismissed to their quarters, 
we were invited to dine at the officers mess in the barracks, where they gave 
us a sumptuous repast. When our commanding officer rose to depart, my 
brother Frederick and myself, when at the door, were requested to rejoin 
them, and to favour them with some songs. We readily agreed, not guessing 
at their intention, which was, according to their expression, " to sew us up ; '' 
but our adjutant, who was an old campaigner, declared to me, in a whisper, 
what their intention was, and I passed the hint to Frederick and the others. 
I sang several songs, and they kept it up with great spirits till it was very 
late, but we were very cautious in taking wine. Not so our hosts, who 
indulged so freely that they were all left under the table ; they had locked us 
in, but we hunted for the key, and finding it in one of their pockets, we 
* turned the tables ' on them by locking them up in their own mess-room for 
the night, and leaving the key in the door, walked home safe and cool. These 
gentlemen had promised to come and see us off in the morning at seven 
o'clock. 

'' The regulation orders were that all officers and members of the corps 
were to clip their horses tails short. Just at this period many people had 
adopted what was styled ' the long tails,' and in Hyde Park, and elsewhere, 
they were becoming generally the fashion. The tail was allowed to grow long, 
descending almost as low as the hocks, being cut off two inches above them, 
and this had a more natural and pleasing appearance to the eye, and was of 
some use to the horse. It was observed by the adjutant that two officers in 
the corps had not obeyed the order regarding their nags, the captain of the 
Melton troop being one, and his lieutenant the other. In the billets taken up 
at Yarmouth, it so happened that the horses of these officers stood next to 
each other, 'the two long tails.' A brother officer, wishing to play a trick 
upon the lieutenant, and give rise to some fun, planned that his horses tail 
should be cut short ; it was not a thoroughbred nag, but that of his captain 
was. A man in the stable undertook the task of docking the animal, but he 
made a dire mistake, and cut quite close the fine tail of the captain's thorough- 
bred. When the thing became known in the morning to the owner, there was 
a tremendous row, and it was the more provoking to the captain because it was 
inspection day, and he was anxious that his charger should appear to the best 
advantage. He came to me on the subject, in a great rage, and said he would 
give fifty pounds to find out the delinquent, but who he was he never 
discovered. 

"The joke rather amused the men, who very naturally said among 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1831. 255 

themselves, * The officers ought to have obeyed the order — we did.' The 
lieutenant did not get off * scot-free ' either. Before we quitted for Norwich, his 
horse had lost his long, flowing tail also. 

" My brother Frederick and I had taken lodgings together at Yarmouth, 
and went home together, after mess at the Angel Hotel. On returning 
home one night, soon after nine oclock, we saw a great mob collected, and 
from the midst of it heard the voice of one of our officers, whom the mob 
were abusing, ' because he was one of the yeomanry I ' My brother and I 
squeezed through the crowd, and found Sir Jacob Astley surrounded by 
a set of roughs and scamps. I took his arm, and we quietly walked with 
him to his hotel, the Bear, over the Bridge. As we were about to enter 
the hotel, the mob made a furious attack upon us. One man, big enough 
to eat Sir Jacob, who was a small man, seized that gentleman by the 
throat About twenty of Astley's men, who were at the Bear at supper, 
rushed out, and there was a battle royal. Our men decided the battle in 
five minutes — they were too strong and active for the ' Yarmouth Herring 
boys,' who quickly took to their heels, and wisely never came near us 
afterwards. 

"In October 1831, the Norfolk Yeomanry mustered on Hempton Green, 
and made altogether a good appearance ; Sir Jacob Astley on the right of 
the line with his men, and Raynham on the left. My brother Frederick 
accepted the command of the Elmham troop, and he being an old officer 
of the 17th Lancers, was of great service to it In Mr Bemey Caldwell 
we had a very active cornet and a good horseman, who rode well to 
hounds." 



In the Norfolk Chronicle^ November 19th, 183 1, a correspondent at SwafFham 
writes : — 

'* Under the favourable auspices of fine weather and a numerous 
assemblage of fashionable beauty, a review took place on Wednesday the 
9th inst of the Melton, Rainham, and Elmham troops of the Norfolk 
Yeomanry cavalry on Hempton Green, near Fakenham, where they were 
inspected by Major the Hon. Geo. John Milles of Elmham, who expressed himself 
much pleased with the good order and discipline, and soldier like appearance 
of the men ; and added, that the precision with which they went through 
their various evolutions were such as would have reflected credit upon veteran 
troops." 



256 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1831-32. 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry 


: 1831. 


Major commanding 


Hon. George John Milles 


31 March 183 1 


Adjutant & cornet 


Thomas Andrews Girling 


18 April 183 1 


Surgeon 


Edward Rudge 

DBRBHAM TROOP 


7 May 1831 


Captain 


Lord James Townshend 


30 April 183 1 


» 


Frederick Loftus 


24 Sept 1 83 1 


Lieut 


John David Hay Hill 


f» »» >f 


Cornet 


William Rowland Sandiford 


18 June 183 1 


58 rank and file 


MELTON TROOP 




Captain 


Sir Jacob Astley, Bart. 


31 March 183 1 


Lieut. 


Joseph Scott 


M 1) n 


Cornet 


William John Brereton 


7 May 183 1 


56 rank and file 


RAINHAM TROOP 




Captain 


Lord Charles Townshend 


31 March 1831 


Lieut. 


Charles Loftus 


» >• ti 


Comet 


Henry Berney Caldwell 


ft w »» 


54 rank and file 






Total 12 oflficers 






168 rank and file. 





I83Z 

Notwithstanding the dislike with which the Yeomanry were regarded, the 
formation of this corps in Norfolk had evidently a good effect upon the rural 
population, and they began to understand how useful it was in the protection it 
afforded to life and property, for although stack burnings still occurred 
occasionally, no attempts were made to destroy machines, except in one 
instance. 

From the Norfolk Chronicle, June 2nd, 1832, it appears that: — 

'' The Melton troop of Yeomanry cavalry met on Saturday last at Holt 
for training and exercise ; and on Monday the whole corps met on Brisley 
Green to be received by their commander Major the Hon. George John 

Milles." 



GEORGE JOHN, FOURTH BARON SONDES, 

Elhham Hall, Norfolk, 

Commanded Norfolk Yeomanrv Cavalry 

FROM 183I TO 1838. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1832-33. 257 

Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry : 1832. 

Major commanding Hon. George John Milles 31 March 183 1 

Adjutant & cornet Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 183 1 

Surgeon Edward Rudge 7 May 183 1 



DEREHAM TROOP 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Cornet 

54 rank and file 



Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

52 rank and file 



Frederick Loftus 
John David Hay Hill 
William Rowland Sandiford 



MELTON TROOP 



Sir Jacob Astley, Bart. 
Joseph Scott 
William John Brereton 



RAINHAM TROOP 



24 Sept 1 83 1 
1 8th June 1831 



31 March 183 1 



» 



i> 



» 



7 May 1831 



n >» 



» M 



>» 



>» 



Captain Lord Charles Vere Ferrers Townshend 31 March 183 1 

Lieut. Charles Loftus 

Cornet Henry Berney Caldwell 

52 rank and file 
Total 12 officers 

158 rank and file 



1833. 
We learn from the Norfolk Chronicle of October 26th, 1833, that the 
Norfolk Yeomanry performed their six days training at Lynn this year, 
It states: — 

"Our Town is just now very gay owing to the presence of the West 
Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, three troops of which are under the command 
of the Hon. Major Milles. 

"They marched into Lynn, preceded by an excellent band, and daily 
proceed to a large field belonging to Mr Freeman of Rising Lodge, distant 
about four miles, where they go through their evolutions. The several 
divisions are under the respective commands of Hon. G. J. Milles, Sir J. 
Astley and Lord C. Townshend, and much credit is due ^o the training 
for their very soldier-like appearance they make. 



258 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1833-34. 



'' A concert under the patronage of the Corps was held at the Market 
Place Room on Wednesday. 

''On Friday, the Mayor gave a dinner to the Officers and a select 
party at the Guild-hall, the band plays every evening in the Market-place 
opposite Head-quarters. The weather being favourable on Saturday, they 
will be reviewed at Rising by Lieut.-Colonel Stisted of the 3rd Dragoons." 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1833. 



Majorcommanding Hon. George John Milles 
Adjutant & Comet Thomas Andrews Grirling 
Surgeon John Banks 



31 March 183 1 

18 April 1831 

I Nov 1833 



DEREHAM TROOP 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

45 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

52 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

56 rank and file 



Frederick Loftus 

William Rowland Sandiford 

Frauds L'Estrange Astley 

MELTON TROOP 

Sir Jacob Astley, Bart. 
Joseph Scott 
William John Brereton 

RAINHAM TROOP 

Lord Charles V. F. Townshend 

Charles Loftus 

Henry Bemey Caldwell 



24 Sept 183 1 
26 June 1833 

•t If M 



31 March 1831 



f% 



It 



II 



7 May 183 1 



31 March 1831 

!• II >f 

i» II n 



Total 12 officers 

153 rank and file 



1834. 
I can find no mention anywhere of the doings of the Norfolk 
Yeomanry during this year, nor where they performed their annual training. 
The newspapers of the day are a blank as regards them. I therefore 
content myself with simply chronicling the list of ofiicers from the War 
Office records. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1834-35. 259 

Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1834. 

Majorcommanding Rt Hon. Lord George John Sondes 

Adjutant & Lieut Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 1831 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

48 rank and file 


DEREHAM TROOP 

Frederick Loftus 

William Rowland Sandiford 

Francis L'Estrange Astley 

MELTON TROOP 


24 Sept 1 83 1 
26 June 1833 


Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

60 rank and file 


Sir Jacob Astley, Bart 

Joseph Scott 

William John Brereton 

RAINHAM TROOP 


31 March 183 1 

fi >i >i 
7 May 1 83 1 


Captain 

Lieut. 

Comet 

60 rank and file 


Lord Charles V. F. Townshend 

Charles Loftus 

Henry Berney Caldwell 


31 March 1831 

n n %% 

II If i» 


Total 12 officers 

168 rank and file 





1835. 

The introduction of the New Poor Law of 1834 was the cause of very 
great* disturbances in many places ; and it was for party purposes made 
use of as an engine of attack by the Tories against the Whig administration, 
and the most violent denunciations of the Act and the mode of its 
operation were constantly made to stimulate the anger and dissatisfaction 
of the poorer classe& And yet, before its adoption, the law of settlement 
had reduced the labouring population to the same condition of confinement 
to one particular spot as in the Azys when the serfs were inalienably 
attached to the soil. The parish in which a man's settlement was secured 
became the utmost range of his employment There were at the time 
many meetings of labourers and occasional strikes demanding an increase 
of wages from is. 4//. to is. td. a day, and especially on the border parishes 
of Norfolk and Suffolk, where Mr. Manning, of Eye, and Mr. Temple 
Frere, of Roydon, were very active in stimulating resistance to these 



26o The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ ^835. 



demands. One of the most serious riots, probably, was that at 
Bircham, which began on the night of the 29th June, 1835. The 
labourers of the neighbourhood had been off their work for about ten 
days, and the village was surprised at ten o'clock at night by the gathering 
of about eight hundred strange men from the surrounding parishes, who 
attacked three houses in which the families had retired to bed. They 
knocked out the doors and windows, broke the furniture, and then collected 
and set fire to it Haycocks were thrown out, and no one dare attempt 
to offer resistance. During the night horses and cattle were turned into 
the fields of standing com, the wheat as well as the houses and farm- 
buildings becoming a complete wreck. The constables were helpless ; one was 
very severely wounded, and eventually the aid of the Yeomanry Cavalry 
and thirty coast-guardsmen was obtained, who rendered valuable service, 
till on the ist July forty-four of the 6th Dragoon Guards arrived from 
Norwich, and the rioters dispersed The troops were quartered in the 
stables of Houghton Hall and at the New Inn stables. This outbreak 
originated in the dissatisfaction of the men employed on the roads, because 
they were paid for their labour half in bread and half in money. The 
Lord - Lieutenant, Lord Wodehouse, had cause to apprehend a repetition 
of such scenes, and in his anxiety and perplexity how to deal with the 
difficulty, he addressed a letter on the ist of August to Lord John 
Russell, then Secretary of State for the Home Department, in which he 
yffxoXit : — ^ It is clear that no reliance whatever can be placed on the special 
constables. I think it my duty to add that there is great reason to expect 
further riots in many parts of the county during the progress of the new 
regulations ordered by the Poor Law Commissioners, and we have no means 
of suppressing them, except by the very small military force at Norwich, 
and a weak corps of Yeomanry Cavalry, of which the numbers are 
incomplete, principally in consequence of the discouragement of gentlemen 
who disapprove of this description of force. Should disturbance arise in 
various parts of the county at the same time, I am at a loss to know by 
what means they are to be quelled, but I am sure that the special 
constables will do more harm than good.'' 

This riot is thus described in the Norfolk Ckromde of June 29th, 

1835 •— 

"Disturbance at Great Bircham and Bircham Tofts. 

<'A messenger was privately dispatched about seven in the evening 
to a neighbouring Magistrate, who had signed the warrants with an account 
of what had taken place, and urging the necessity of some force being 
called in to insure safety ; as from the spirit indicated by the mob 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1835. 261 



accumulated, most serious apprehensions were entertained that some dreadful 
violence would be renewed in the night Answer was returned that he had 
already, or would immediately dispatch orders to the commanders of the 
Rainham and Melton troops of Yeomanry Cavalry, and that the Preventive 
Service Men from the coast would be at his house by eleven o'clock, to be 
sent for, there, in case of any disturbance. This too surely followed, for at 
between eleven and twelve o'clock, from the numbers of ill disposed persons 
pouring in from the adjacent parishes, all armed with deadly clubs, it was 
computed that at least eight or nine hundred, marched under order to 
attack Mr Kittons house ; every window and door were instantly demolished 
and broken in, (by means of the upper back of gates which were used as 
battering rams) even to the sills and frames. Furniture of every description 
in the two front rooms and kitchen were broken into ten thousand pieces 
piled up in the middle of the floor on the carpet, and by means of books 
etc set light to. Every inmate of the family had fled by the back of the 
house, into the fields, Mr Tilney only being left, he most fortunately having 
been put into a back room. By a happy state of strat^em, the hpuse, and 
the whole were saved from conflagration. One of two better disposed 
persons rushed up to these incendaries begging them for their lives to 
disperse, as the military were entering the Parish ; he with his companion, 
then extinguished the flames. While this was going on, Mr Hebgins house 
was in a like manner attacked, himself, though in bed, wounded, while Mrs 
Hebgins and infant escaped over a back wall, and after being exposed in 
his own farm-yard for some time were at length privately conveyed to 
Dersingham Ling House. 

*' Mr Nurses house was also attacked, but partially, in consequence of a 
cry being set up to proceed to Bircham Tofts. A well-disposed person 
hastened thither to apprize Mr Howlett of their intention, in time to enable 
him and his family to leave. Mrs Howlett, together with five children 
taken from their beds were obliged to be concealed in the fields at the 
back of the house, while in a very short time this as far as the exterior 
was reduced to the same state of ruin. About noon on Tuesday, the 
preventive men, and military arrived, but the mischief was eflected. Most 
of the discontented requested permission of their employers to resume their 
work, which was granted, and this morning (Wednesday) all is quiet, and 
the troops were marched from their bivouac for dismissal" 

Charles Loftus, in *' My Life," thus describes this incident : — 

''In 1835 reports reached us that the labourers were meeting in the 
neighbourhood of Docking, and showed symptoms of a disposition to 
rioting. At eleven oclock on the night after this news reached me, a man 



262 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1835. 



on horseback arrived from Mr Derrick Hoste to say that there had been 
a riot at Docking, where the labourers had attacked the farmhouse close 
by, and that everyone was in the greatest alarm. A note was also given 
to me, requesting me to bring my troop, and to ask the Major-Commandant, 
Hon. George Milles, to bring up all the men he could with the other troops 
to the scene of the disturbance. I lost no time in sending off mounted 
men to Major Milles, to Sergeant Diggins at Raynham, and to Mr Case 
of Testerton House, to give notice to all the men of the Raynham troop 
to assemble on Hempton Green in marching order as soon as possible. 
One of the farmers sent a man and horse with a note from me to the 
adjutant at Holt, twenty miles away. This man took the same note to 
Elmham Hall, as he passed, informing Major Milles of the order. The 
Reverend Mr Hall of Cressingham, who was staying with me, rode off 
to Hillboro to inform Mr Caldwell, my comet, of what was stirring, at the 
same time desiring him to repair to Hempton Ghreen, and bring with him 
three Swaffham mea I then started off myself, pistol in holsters, cartridges 
in my pouch, in marching order. I knew where all my men lived, and 
called on them on my way, and they sent off messengers to others, not 
far distant; so the news flew like the wind, and all the country side in a 
short time was up. 

*'Soon after six in the morning, five and thirty members of my troop, 
comprising fifty-six men, met me at Hempton, and at half past six all 
were present but one man. Major Milles came up with the Elmham and 
Dereham people, and my brother. Captain Frederick Loftus, brought up 
the remainder, the adjutant also arriving with forty Holt men. We 
marched for Bircham, on the other side of Houghton Hall, where we 
halted and dismounted, sending a messenger into Docking, who, when he 
returned, told us that all was now quiet, that there had been some attempt 
to riot, but that the coast-guard men at Lynn, and other places, had come 
up in the night, and had prevented it We were requested, however, to 
march into Docking to show ourselves, which we did, drawing up in front 
of the inn, where we halted two hours, so many men dismounting at a 
time to get refreshment I was sorry to learn that Mr Davey, a 
magistrate, had been injured by a stone. 

'' Our appearance had a good effect, for men who were standing about 
in groups, talking of the attempt at riot and planning mischief, dispersed 
almost at once. We left our troop at Bircham for the night, and the rest 
proceeded to the stables at Houghton, which being empty, there was room 
for all the horses. We got some cold beef and sandwiches at Docking 
and Bircham, a provision with which we were satisfied. Major Milles slept 
that night by the side of his horse, as he did at Quatrebras on the night 
previous to Waterloo. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1835. 



263 



'' Everything passed oflT quietly. The labourers who had created this 
disturbance were wonderfully surprised when they saw the soldiers coming, 
and so promptly, too, from far and wide (indeed we were much praised 
for our activity and zeal in assembling from all parts of the county on 
so short notice), and would not believe they were Yeomanry Cavalry, but 
the Dragoons from Norwich, our dress, as I have described, being that of 
heavy Dragoons, and completly deceived the yokels. At noon the following 
day a troop of the 17th Lancers came from Norwich, and our corps 
marched home. The Lancers took up their quarters at Lynn, but twenty 
men and an officer were sent to Fakenham, where they remained for some 
time." 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry : 1835. 

Major commanding Lord George John Sondes 31 March 183 1 
Adjutant & Lieut Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 1831 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

66 rank and file 



RAINHAM TRCX)P 

Lord Charles V. F. Townshend 31 March 183 1 

Charles Loftus 

Henry Berney Caldwell 



•I 



ft 



>• 



>» 



DEREHAM TROOP 

Frederick Loftus 

William Rowland Sandiford 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

51 rank and file 

Captain 
Lieut 

Comet 

36 rank and file 

MELTON TROOP 

Broken up in the month of May 
Total 10 officers 

153 rank and file 



HOLT TROOP 

William John Brereton 
John Brereton 



24 Sept 1 83 1 
26 June 1833 



22 May 1835 



264 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 836. 

1836. 

The Norfolk Chronicle^ May 30th, 1836, has a paragraph to the effect 
that: — ^"'AU the Yeomanry Cavalry will be inspected this year. Field 
officers of the line being appointed for that purpose. The Lords Lieuts 
of Counties have in consequence made the necessary communications to 
the commandants." 

Charles Loftus, in •'My Life/' says: — 

*'In the spring of 1836 we were again called out to quell an expected 
riot near Cromer, occasioned by the dislike of the people to the building 
of a new poor house. Lord Sondes was in London, but I was at 
Raynham, oddly enough. Mr. Flavell, the magistrate of Holt, sent a 
request to me to assemble my troop and bring them there. My man, 
whom I fortunately met at the hotel outside Raynham, where I was 
conversing with a gentleman who had come to see the old Hall, brought 
my accoutrements, &c, in a gig. I immediatly sent off messages to the 
men of the troop, and having accoutred myself and my horse, I set off 
across the park to Diggins, while fortunately for me, my good friend 
Wood, who had come from Morston to Hempton Green fair, came on to 
Raynham to meet me, with his usual energy and prompitude, on his 
beautiful black mare. He then rode back to the Green, where he found 
thirty of our men, who being informed that they were needed, started 
home and dressed themselves, and in an hour were ready, enabling me to 
march out of Fakenbam, with my two trumpeters, Samuel Tuttle and 
Jonas Wright, playing their bugles to the tune of ''The British 
Grenadiers." Wood then rode off home, fourteen miles farther to 
Morston, dressed, and joined me at the foot of Holt Hill at six in the 
evening. 

"In Holt we found many of the troop assembled waiting for us, 
under Captain Girling, adjutant I reported myself to Mr Flavell, who 
was much pleased with our prompt obedience to his summons. Curiously 
enough, the news of our arrival had preceded them, and the valiant mob 
who had assembled 'to do and dare' any kind of mischief, had taken 
mortal fright on hearing the fearful news that I had ' brought with me 
plenty of ball cartridges, to shoot down the rioters as I would partridges ! ' 
— an idea which made them quickly take to their heels. 

"This terrible story arose in this way. Seeing a number of idlers 
staring and jeering at us in the market place, I said to Diggins, 'Serve 
out the cartridges to the troop, and mind, no man must miss his aim.' 
One man, hearing this, exclaimed, ' What a bloody minded man I — ^now 
hear that!' while another rejoined. 'Yes, and hes just the one to keep 



I 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 836. 



265 



his word, too, and do it' So before the tale reached the scene of action, 
It had grown to this proportion — that I had brought with me plenty of 
ball cartridges, * to shoot down the rioters as I would partridges.' 
" We returned home next morning, leaving all quiet behind us." 



The Norfolk Chronicle, September 24th, 1836, states : — 

''On Saturday last, the corps of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry under 
command of Major Lord Sondes were inspected by Lieut-Col. Bingham 
of the 17th Lancers, who was pleased to express himself highly gratified, 
not only by the general appearance of the corps ; but also at the very 
quick and steady manner in which they performed the several evolutions 
in the field. He states 'that their state of discipline far surpassed his 
expectations and that he considered them perfectly competent to undertake 
any duty they may be called upon to perform.' 

'* At three oclock the three troops sat down to a splendid dinner in 
Elmham Hall, provided for them by their worthy and much respected 
Major." 

Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1836. 

• 

Major commanding Lord George John Sondes 31 March 183 1 

Adjutant & Lieut Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 183 1 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 



'Captain 

Lieut 
•Cornet 

52 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

40 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

43 rank and file 



RAINHAM TROOP 

Lord Charles V. F. Townshend 31 March 1831 
Charles Loftus 

• 99 j> if 

Henry Berney Caldwell „ ,. „ 



HOLT TROOP 

William John Brereton 
John Brereton 



22 May 1835 



M H 



t> 



DEREHAM TROOP 

Frederick Loftus 

William Rowland Sandiford 



24 Sept 183 1 
26 June 1833 



Total 



10 officers 

135 rank and file 



266 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1837-38. 

Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry; 1837. 

Major commanding Lord George John Sondes . 31 March 183 1 

Adjutant & Capt Thomas Andrews Girling 17 May 1837 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 



RAINHAM TROOP 



Captain 


Charles Loftus 


Lieut 


Henry Bemey Caldwell 


Comet 


Champion Partridge 


60 rank and file 






HOLT TROOP 


Captain 


John Thomas Mott 


Lieut 


John Brereton 


Comet 




49 rank and file 






DBRBHAII TROOP 


Captain 


William Rowland Sandiford 


Lieut 


Ferdinand Ives 


Comet 




49 rank and file 




Total 10 officers 




158 rank and file 



17 May 1837 

31 Oct 1837 

4 Dec 1837 



17 May 1837 
22 May 1835 



31 Oct 1837 
4 Dec 1837 



1 8381 
The early days of the reign of Queen Victoria were days of no little 
anxiety. Canada went into rebellion, aided by some adventurers from the 
United States; and at home the contests between employers and employed 
were often very bitter. The low wages paid to the Norwich weavers led 
to combinations among them, and damage was frequently sustained by firms 
selected for victims. Messrs. Churton and Clarke, manufacturers, complained 
to the Government that they could get no redress from the magistrates, and 
their case was a sample of others. Political meetings became frequent in 
rural districts, both in Norfolk and Suffolk; and country gentlemen, often 
frightened, and exaggerating the danger, plied the Home Office with letters of 
complaint 

The harvests of 1837 and 1838 had been very defective throughout the 
whole country, though in Norfolk the deficiency was less marked than in any 
other county ; yet here it was between one-fourth and one-fifth less than in the 
two preceeding years. There was, therefore, much distress among the lower 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 838. 267 



classes. Chartism, which during ten years was a cause, throughout some 
parts of England, of much anxiety to peaceful people, never had more than a 
very few supporters in Norfolk, and not even among the working classes in 
Norwich; which is the more surprising because the city was at that time 
a hotbed of party contentions. 

The Norfolk Chronicle, March 24th, 1838, states: — 

''The determination immediately to disband the Yeomanry cavalry of 
Great Britain is amongst the most extraordinary that we have witnessed 
on the part even of a Whig Radical Ministry. 

''At a crisis, when manufacturing England and tranquil Ireland are in 
process of being drained of regular troops to keep down rebellion in Canada, 
and to guard against American invaders of our peaceable colonies; to 
disarm and disembody so truly loyal, constitutional, cheap, and efficient a 
defence of the nation, appears to be the worst time and most ungracious 
measure that could possibly be resorted ta But the Liberals, it seems may 
do anything; and they will do everything but confer benefit or honour 
or security on the country.' 



91 



There is an announcement in the Norfolk Chronicle of March 24th, 
1838, that: 

"Last week orders were received at Eye, from the Home Office to 
disband the Norfolk and Suffolk troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded 
by Sir E. Kerrison Bart" 

This corps was never shown on the Norfolk lists as belonging to the 
county of Norfolk ; Sir E. Kerrison lived at Oakley Park on the border of 
the two counties, but he recruited largely from men residing in South 
Norfolk or the borders, as I have come across the same corps, described 
as the Norfolk and Suffolk Borderers. 

In connection with this corps, I find that it is described as the 
Norfolk and Suffolk Borderers Yeomanry, and that they had an existence 
up to the year 1850 at any rate. 

In an old minute book which was placed at my disposal by the 
Dowager Lady Bateman, I find that the leading inhabitants of the borders 
of the two counties formed a club about the year 1833, which had for its 
object the providing of an annual dinner on the King's birthday to 
members of the troop ; for the payment of any contingent expenses that 
might arise in the course of their service, and to give encouragement to 
the different members as may be thought advisable. 

There was held a meeting at the White Lion Inn, Eye, when the 
Rules and Regulations were approved and adopted. 



268 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 838. 



The undermentioned noblemen and gentlemen became members 
thereof: — 

Lord Bayning Robert Gamble 

Lord Henniker Robert Sherifie 

Gen. Sir R Kerrison, Bart Capt J. Worth 

Rev. Sir W. Kemp T. C. Brettingham 

Sir Augustus Henniker, Bart William Mines 

Admiral Sir C Cunningham Thomas French 

Archdeacon Oldershaw Harry Browne 

Rev. Temple Frere Thomas Havers 

Geoi^e St. Vincent Wilson Rev. Dr. Chevallier 

John Ayton &c., &c. 

The members were elected by ballot, and two black balls excluded. 

And in the other rules it states that this club was formed for the 
express purpose of giving support and encouragement to the G>rps of 
Yeomanry called the Norfolk and Suffolk Borderers. 

There were a large number of clergymen, members of this club. The 
minutes were regularly kept, from its formation, and the last meeting 
recorded is March 12th, 1850; and it is stated that the 5th of April would 
be the most convenient day for the Troop to accept the invitation to the 
dinner, as they would on that day complete their training and exercise 
Here, at this date, the minute book suddenly stops. 

It is evident from this that the Norfolk and Suffolk were in actual 
existence up to this date. 

1833—1835 
Among the Pay Lists preserved with the War Office Records is the 

following list of officers of the Suffolk and Norfolk Border Yeomanry for 

1833 ; that for 1835 is identical 

*' Fay List and Return of Sir Edward Kerrison's troop of the Suffolk 

and Norfolk Border Yeomanry Cavalry, which assembled for permanent 

duty at Ipswich, from 30 May 1833 to 6 June 1833." 

Officer commanding the troop George S^ V. Wilson : Lieut 

Captain Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart, M.P. 

Lieut George S^ Vincent Wilson 

Cornet Thomas Clark Brettingham 

Qr. Master Edward Syer 

Sergt. John Roper 

„ James Drake 

Corporal John Roper, jua 

,, John Moore 

(The return for 1835 contains the same names.) 



Gen. sir EDWARD KERRISON, Bart., K.C.B., M.P., 

Oaklev I'ark, Suffolk, 

commanded 

Norfolk and Suffolk Borderers Yeomanry Cavalry 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cofualry of Norfolk^ 1838. 269 



Charles Loftus, in "My Life," says: — 

"In the spring of 1838, Lord Sondes ordered the corps of yeomanry 
under his command to muster near Brisley. We marched to Sennowe 
Lodge, Mr. Wodehouses property, where we went through a days exercise. 
I was not aware of the object in thus assembling the troops, till his 
lordship, forming us into close column, informed us that in consequence of 
the Government having, as he thought, unwisely reduced the Kentish 
yeomanry cavalry to half their strength, he was resolved no longer to serve 
in the yeomanry cavalry of Norfolk. He had taken a deep interest in the 
well being and efficiency of the Kent corps, under the command of his 
gallant friend, Lord Winchilsea, he himself being a captain of the corps, 
and having a large landed interest in that county ; and feeling . quite 
uncertain if the Government would not reduce the Norfolk corps in the 
same unceremonious way, he had resolved to resign his command of them. 
This, of course, surprised everyone. After a short speech of commendation, 
thanking the officers and men for their attention to his wishes and commands, 
and their politeness to himself, he dismissed us." 



The following letter appears in the Norfolk Chronicle of March 31st, 
1838. 

" To the officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of the Norfolk 
corps of the Yeomanry cavalry. 

"Elmham Hall, 

*' March 28th, 1838. 
*' Brother comrades, 

*' Her Majesty's Government have disbanded a great part of 
the Yeomanry force of the country, troops raised under precisely similar 
circumstances as our own. Our corps is for the present spared — how long 
it will be allowed to remain in existence is very doubtful. 

"The Prime Minister said in the House of Lords, a few evenings ago, 
' that the establishment of the Yeomanry corps took place at a period of 
emergency and without any idea of their permanent continuance,' he 
certainly added, * that it was not the intention to make any further reduction, 
unless rendered advisable by circumstances.' What these circumstances may 
be I cannot say, but I may conjecture — I am willing to prove my loyal 
attachment to the throne by serving her Majesty — but I will not as an 
independant man, subject myself to the capricious and uncertain conduct 
of the present administration. I have therefore resigned my commission 



270 The Records of the Yeomanry CavcUry of Norfolk, 1838. 



as Major commandant of your corps. Without presuming to influence your 
conduct, I humbly advise you to do the same, resign, — disband yourselves 
— ^and do not wait to be dismissed — ^though by doing so, you will per- 
haps lose the opportunity of accepting the gracious but I must say. rather 
burlesque boon for your services, *that of being allowed to retain your 
rank and honours/ which would have been granted you, had you been 
disbanded. 

^ If the Government had been anxious to maintain the Yeomanry, 
they should have given some encouragement to those concerned in keeping 
it up, instead of throwing difficulties in the way, after the great exertions 
that have been made to render it an efficient force, by now so summarily 
dismissing a great part of it Gentlemen, in taking leave of you, I can 
assure you it is with the most sincere regret and paia 

^I thank you from the bottom of my heart, for the attention you 
have always, invariably given to my orders; it will be a satisfaction to 
me, and I am sure it will be the same to you, that our services have 
not been useless. 

**! cannot forget, the country ought not to forget, the zeal, the 
alacrity, with which upon one occasion, you obeyed the order of one 
single Magistrate, and marched to a distant part of the county, in an 
incredible short space of time, to a scene of horrible devastation and 
riot; and by your presence and discipline stayed the further progress of 
such proceedings, as brought a disgrace upon the British name; upon 
other occasions the same zeal was shewn. 

*'With such a gallant body of men, I would have trusted myself, as 
your commanding officer, in any event however difficult and dangerous it 
might have beea It will be a pleasure and gratification to me, though 
we are no longer companions in arms, to live as a neighbour in friendly 
intercourse amongst you, and if it should be in my power at any time 
to render you any service, pray command me. 

^ I have the honour to be 
'^ Gentlemen 
*'with great respect 
''your most faithful servant 

" SONDES 
'' Late Major commandant 

"Norfolk corps Yeomanry cavalry." 



CHAPTER VII. 

1838 to 1849. 

Major Loftus Assumes Commandvice Lora Sondes — Training at Dereham^ 1838 — 
Presentation of Standard to Hingham Troo^ — Training at Holt — Train- 
ing at Cromer^ 1840 — Presentation to Major Loftus^ 1840 — Training at 

Yarmouth^ Swaffham, Fakenham — Presentation of Standard by Lord- 
Lieutenant — Training at Holt, 1844; Dereham^ 1845; Cromer ^ 1846; 

WellSf 1847 — Disbandment of the Yeomanry^ 1849. 

1838. 
Charles Loftus, in " My Life," says :— 

" What was to be the consequence of Lord Sondes' resignation, I had 
myself no idea. A few days after, I received from the Lord-Lieutenant a 
letter, requesting me to go to Kimberley. Of course, I obeyed this summons. 
After expressing his regret at what Lord Sondes had done. Lord Wodehouse 
said he wished me to take the command, and that he should name me as the 
Major-Commandant to Her Majesty. This he did, and I was now in command 
of the corps into which I had entered as lieutenant on its first formation in 
1831. I recommended my lieutenant, H. B. Caldwell, Esq, to be captain of 
the Raynham troop. Mr. John Mott had been sent for by Lord Wodehouse to 
join the Holt troop, which post he accepted, and kept it in excellent order. 
Captain Ives took command of the Dereham and Hingham troop. The list of 
subalterns was soon filled up." 



The Norfolk Chronicle, April 7th, 1838, states :— 

''On Wednesday last, Capt Charles Loftus entertained his troop, the 
Rainham troop of the Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry at dinner at Billingford Hall, 
with true old English hospitality. About S^ sat down and several of the 
oflScers were present^ John Mott Esq, F. Ives Esq, R Caldwell Esq, Capt Girling 
etc etc 

'' After dinner a variety of loyal toasts were drunk. Upon the health of 
the late gallant Major Lord Sondes being proposed, Capt Loftus announced to 
his troop, that the Lord Lieutenant of the county, Lord Wodehouse had done 



272 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1838. 

him the honour to request him to take the command of the three troops vacant 
by the resignation of Lord Sondes^ and which it appears are to remain in the 
same efBgient state as heretofore. The Dereham troop, which was partially 
disorganized by his Lordship's retirement, has been reformed in the Eastern 
division of the county, and completed to its usual strength under the new 
name of the Hingham troop by Capt. Ives." 

Again on October 13th, 1838, the Chronicle states : — 

" On Monday the 8th inst the town of Dereham was enlivened at an early 
hour by the trumpet sound for a turn out of a troop of Norfolk Yeomanry 
cavalry in marching order. 

'' The Hingham troop lately raised was on this occasion assembled for the 
first time. The non commissioned officers and men have been selected with 
great care from the yeomanry residing in the Forehoe hundred^ and the troop 
has in its ranks some of the finest young men and best riders in the 
county, and are all well mounted on strong serviceable horses. The 
uniform is handsome, being like that of the second Life Guards with silver 
instead of gold lace. 

**We understand that on Monday next, the Lord Lieutenant of the 
county intends to present a standard to this troop and to honour the officers 
and men with his company at dinner afterwards at Hingham." 

On October 20th, 1838, the same paper contains an account of the 
presentation of a standard to the Hingham troop. 

''The Hingham troop of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, commanded by 
Captain Ives, had a high compliment paid to them last Monday by the 
presentation of a standard from the Lord Lieutenant of the county. 
Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, most of the principal 
families in that part of the county were present. Soon after one oclock, Lord 
Wodehouse accompanied by Major Loftus, Captains Mott and Girling and 
Lieutenant Brereton bearing the standard, with its proper escort, arrived on 
the ground. His Lordship in placing the standard in the hands of Captain 
Ives, addressed the troop in appropriate terms. 

" Captain Ives upon receiving the standard, acknowledged the compliment 
paid to the troop, and the men gave three hearty cheers for the Lord 
Lieutenant 

*^ The usual parade movements were then performed, after which the troop 
returned to the town." 



The Noffolk Chronicle^ November 3rd, 1838, relates that : — 

'' By an order from the War office in London, the three troops of Norfolk 
Yeomanry cavalry met at Dereham on the 22nd ult. for six days duty. The 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1838. 273 



corps consisting of 156 men under Major Loftus, newly appointed and 
completely equipped, were received on their entering the town with their 
band at their head, with the greatest enthusiasm, with the bells ringing and the 
greater part of the inhabitants meeting them on the road. The weather 
during the week was favourable and drilling was the order of the day. On 
Tuesday the Theatre was patronized by both officers and men, the play having 
been bespoke by the former, and the band attending. The house was full and 
on the appearance of the officers they were warmly and loudly greeted. On 
Wednesday the officers gave a dinner to the non-commissioned officers at the 
Kings Arms. On Thursday the 2Sth they were entertained by W. W. Lee 
Warner Esq. Quebec House. From whence they adjourned to the assembly 
rooms to meet the company they had invited to the ball, which was attended 
by nearly 300 of the principal nobility and gentry of the county. 

''The ball was opened by the Lord Lieutenant and Mrs Loftus, and 
amongst the company were Lord and Lady Wodehouse, Lord and Lady 
Sondes, the High Sheriff of the county, Sir James Flower and Lady Flower, 
the Hon. Mrs. W. Wodehouse, and the two Misses Wodehouse, General Sir 
Robert Harvey KC.B. and Lady Harvey, the Hon. Mr De Grey, Mr 
Tollmache, Mr and Mrs KnatchbuU, Mr and Misses Hamond, Sir Charles and 
Lady Clarke, Mr Chute M.P. Mr and Mrs Lee Warner of Walsingham Abbey, 
Mr Geary, Capt and Mrs Fitzroy, Mr Lytton Bulwer, Mr and Mrs Gurdon, Mr 
and Mrs Buckworth, Capt. and Mrs Mott, Mr and Mrs Miles Astley, Mr 
Knightly, Col. Mason, Mr Ferrand, M.P. and Mrs Ferrand, Col. and Mrs Packe, 
Mr and Mrs and Misses Bemey of Morton, Mr and Mrs Fountaine, Col. John 
Harvey, Capt. and Mrs Caldwell, Miss Ives, Mr Stratton Marsham. Capt and 
Misses Hodge, Mr and Mrs Lee Warner of Quebec, Major Blomfield, Misses 
Thomlinson, Mrs and Miss Edwards of Hardingham, Mr Birch of Wretham, 
Mrs and the Misses Crawshay, Mr and Mrs Girling, Rev. Mr Hedley,* Mr 
Hamilton Custance, Mr and Mrs Isham, Capt and Mrs Frederick Loftus, Mr 
and Mrs Helmsworth, Mr Brereton, Mr Bignold, Mr Norris, Mr Rushbrooke, 
Col. Dixon, Rev. Mr Gurdon, Rev. Mr Nelson, Rev. Mr Paddon and Mrs 
Paddon etc. etc 

*' The room was appropriately and tastefully decorated, and dancing was 
kept up with great spirit till three o'clock. On Saturday morning, the 
inspection of the corps took place by a field officer of the 4th Royal Irish 
Regiment of Dragoon Guards, who soon after one oclock arrived on the 
ground, which had been placed at their disposal by W. W. Lee Warner, Esq., 
for this occasion, accompanied by his aide-de-camp and the Lord Lieut. 
of the county and was received with the usual military salute. The corps 
marched past in squadrons, and ranked past in half squadrons, and having 
wheeled into line went through several manoeuvres. It is with the greatest 

s 



2 74 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1838. 



satisfaction, we have it in our power to state, that when the inspecting officer 
called upon Major Loftus to go through some manoeuvres, for which they were 
not all prepared, the same were performed in the most correct manner. We 
should be wanting in justice to the officers, and to the members who composed 
this useful body of men, if we did not in the most explicit and candid manner 
say that everjrthing passed off reflecting upon all the highest credit and 
perfectly satisfactorily to Lieut Col. Chetterton, who made a most minute 
inspection, and who at the conclusion expressed to Major Loftus his high 
approbation of all that he had witnessed and requested him to communicate 
the same to the corpa" 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry : 1838. 



1838. 



Major commanding 
Adjutant and Capt 

Surgeon 



Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 

Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 1831 adjt 

17 May 1837 Capt 
John Banks i Nov 1833 



HIMGHAM TBOOP 

(Re-formed from the late Denkam troep) 

Captain Ferdinand Ives 

Lieut. J. R. Ives 

Cornet Denn Young 
49 rank and file 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Cornet 

53 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

65 rank and file 



HOLT TROOP 

John Thomas Mott 
John Brereton 



RAINHAM TROOP 



Henry Bemey Caldwell 

Jennis Diggings 

Theo. J. Russell Buckworth 



9 April 1838 

I May 1838 

12 Dec 1838 



17 May 1837 
22 May 1837 



9 April 1838 



i» f« 



f» 



I May 1838 



Total II officers 

167 rank and file 



Major CHARLES LOFTUS, 

Commanded Prince Albert's Own Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry 

KROH 1838 to 1849. 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1839. 275 



183Q. 

In the Norfolk Chronicle^ June 8th, 1839, we find that:— ** The Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry, mustered on Thornage Green, on Monday last, the 
27th ult. for six days duty at Holt, under the command of Major Loftus, 
an officer who formerly held a commission in the Coldstream Guards and 
whose grand father, the first Marquis Townshend was the first who ever 
formed a corps of Yeomanry. 

^'The Hingham troop, commanded by Captain Ives lately of the 25th 
Hussars appeared on the ground at three o'clock, conspicuous from the 
handsome appearance and appointments of the Gentlemen who are members 
of this troop, and the value of their horses, most of which are said to be 
worth from fifty to one hundred guineas each. Captain Caldwell and the 
Rainham squadron, and Captain Mott and the Holt troop, completed the 
line, superintended by Captain Girling the adjutant, an officer distinguished 
as having served in the 5th regiment of foot, during the whole of the 
Peninsula war, and at the memorable battle of Corunna. The weather was 
favourable, and on several occasions a lai^e concourse of spectators assembled 
on the exercising ground. 

** On Wednesday and Thursday, a match at cricket was played between 
the officers and non-commissioned officers on one side and the privates on 
the other, which was won by the latter with a great majority. The bowling 
of young Pilch, and the batting of Capt Caldwell, and of Mr. Turner of 
Carleton were greatly admired. 

'* On Friday the Lord-Lieutenant of the county reviewed the corps, and 
expressed his satisfaction at the general appearance. A sumptuous enter- 
tainment was provided by the officers for his Lordship, at the Feathers Inn, 
and a large party of upwards of fifty of the resident gentlemen in the town 
and neighbourhood were invited to meet him. 

*' On Saturday, Lieut-Colonel Campbell of the 9th or Queens Lancers 
arrived to inspect the troops, and after a minute examination of the arms 
and appointments, the corps marched and trotted past and several manoeuvres 
having been performed, the gallant Lieut-Colonel expressed himself entirely 
satisfied with the accuracy and steadiness of the same. 

'^In the afternoon the troops were dismissed in the Market Place and 
the inhabitants of Holt were left to their native quiet." 



276 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1839-40. 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1839. 

Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 

Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 1831 

17 May 1837 Capt 
John Banks i Nov 1833 



Major commanding 
Adjutant 

Surgeon 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

57 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

47 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

$0 rank and file 

Total II officers 
1 54 rank and 



FIRST OR RAINHAM TROOP 

Henry Bemey Caldwell 9 April 1838 
Theo. J. Russell Buckuorth 6 July 1839 
John Brown 22 March 1839 

SBCOND OR H INGHAM TROOP 

Ferdinand Ives 9 April 1838 



Denn Young 

THIRD OR HOLT TROOP 

John Thomas Mott 
John Brereton 
Thomas Boyd 



6 July 1839 



17 May 1837 
22 May 1835 
26 Aug 1839 



file 



184a 
The Norfolk Chronicle of May 28th, 1840, states :—'' That Cromer, that 
salubrious and much frequented marine bathing place, has had its accustomed 
state of quietude temporally broken in upon by a not unpleasing circumstance 
of military musterings, such indeed as was wont to happen continually during 
the bygone period of actual war ; but which is of course now-a-days of rare 
occurence. We allude to the arrival here on permanent duty, of the three 
regimental troops of the Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, which took place on 
Monday last. 

''The Rainham troop mustered at Aylmertoo Row at one oclock,and were 
soon after joined by their worthy and much esteemed Captain H. B. Caldwell 
Esq, Lieutenant Buckworth and Cornet Brown ; they appeared to be about 50 
in number, and every man was at his post at the appointed hour. The 
Hingham troop assembled in the town of Aylsham, and was met by their 
gallant Captain Ferdinand Ives Esq, who invited them to a sumptuous break- 
fast at the Black Boys Inn, prepared by Mr Tatham the landlord. The 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1840. 277 



officers attached to the troop are, Pamell R. Matllard Esq of Margate Hall, the 
newly appointed lieutenant ; and Denn Young Esq of Brooke. At half past 
twelve this fine troop paraded in the Market Place, complete in both men and 
horses, and marched off to the place of rendezvous. The Holt troop 
commanded by Captain John Mott, eldest son of J. T. Mott Esq of Barningham 
Hall were mustered near Aylmerton-row, and with Lieutenant Brereton, and 
cornet Boyd, moved off towards Roughton Heath, where in a few minutes 
afterwards they were drawn up in a line with the whole corps, and Major 
Loftus accompanied by his adjutant, captain Girling, a distinguished officer in 
the Peninsular war, arrived to take command. Major Loftus, who has been 
indefatigable in his exertions to bring the corps to a high state of discipline, 
made a most minute inspection of the arms, accoutrements, etc. From the 
general rendezvous on Roughton Heath, the whole corps under the command 
of Major Loftus, marched into Cromer, which they entered about four oclock in 
the afternoon ; and the weather which had been rainy, fortunately cleared up. 
Their approach to, and arrival in the place, presented an animated and attrac- 
tive scene. With swords drawn and standards unfurled, preceded by their fine 
brass band, the Cavalry drew up in single rank, along the three faces of the 
Church square, where they were billetted off to the quarters respectively 
assigned to each troop, and considering the difficulties unavoidably attendant 
on so novel and extensive a requisition of ' good entertainment for man and 
horse.' we believe they all found suitable accommodation at different inns, 
hotels, and private premises with as little confusion or delay as could reason- 
ably be expected. 

*' The Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry are a fine body of men and, with few 
exceptions, well mounted, there are indeed so.me superb horses among them. 
Their uniform and appointments (assimilating closely in cut and other details 
with those of Her Majest/s regiments of Dragoon Guards) contribute greatly 
to their soldierlike appearance. The full dress of the officers is very rich and 
becoming. Nor have we any hesitation in saying that the corps is one of which 
the county can justly be proud 

" On Tuesday, part of the day was intended to have been devoted to a 
general drill of the corps on horseback, but both morning and noon proved 
extremely wet; and the occupations of the day were therefore confined to 
practising the sword exercise and to a little marching and counter marching on 
foot at afternoon parade. 

" Wednesday morning, being delightfully fine, the Yeomanry obeyed betimes 
the trumpet sound, ' To horse,' and proceeded in complete marching order to a 
field gratuituously offered (as we understand) to Major Loftus for the use of 
the corps, during their stay, by Mr John Clarke, one of the tenants of the 
Fclbrigg estate." 



2yS The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1840. 



Charles Loftus, in " My Life," says : — 

" I had brought the corps to such a state of efficiency that, when G>lonel 
the Hon. William Molyneux, of the 8th Hussars, inspected them at Cromer, 
he requested me, at the conclusion of our field day, to permit him to address 
a few words to the officers and men. I remember perfectly well the words 
he used. Turning to me in the most polite manner, as I reined in my horse 
near him, he said, 

**' Major Loftus, and gentlemen of the Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, I beg to 
say a few words to you to express my admiration of the efficient state of 
discipline in which I find you.' Turning to me, ' Sir, your officers are well 
instructed ; and gentlemen, yosx oi^ht to be proud of your commanding 
officer; you are an honour to your country, and I shall have the greatest 
satisfaction in making the highest report of you.' 

'* I thanked him very much for Uie kind address he had made, which I well 
knew was fully deserved by the corps under my command. Colonel Molyneux, 
a very handsome man, wearing the brilliant uniform of the 8th Hussars, and 
mounted on a magnificent charger, covered with a leopard skin, rode into 
Cromer with me, the band playing several lively airs, among them, ' In the 
days when we went gipsying/ which amused him much. We drew up in front 
of Tucker's Hotel, where we saluted the gallant colonel, and gave him three 
hearty cheers, and invited him to dinner, to which of course he came." 



We find in the Norfolk Chronicle of July 31st, 1840, the following account: — 
" On Friday last, the Market Town of East Dereham was honoured with an 
assembly of the non-commissioned Officers and Members of the Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry in the dress uniforms, and a large and highly respectable 
company of Ladies and Gentlemen, to witness the presentation of a piece of 
plate subscribed for by this Cavalry Corps, to their Major, Charles Loftus Esq. 
On the lawn at the entrance of the Bowling Green of the Kings Arms Inn, a 
large and spacious covered tent was erected, affording accommodation for 
upwards of 260 persons. Then a piece of plate to be presented to Major 
Loftus was brought in amidst the enthusiastic cheers of the company, and 
placed on the cross table in front of the Chairman. 

'' It consisted of an elegant chased silver Candlebrum, having the following 
inscription, — 

31st July, 1840. 

Presented to 
Major Charles Loftus 

by the non-commissioned officers and privates of the Corps of Norfolk 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1840-41. 279 



Yeomanry Cavalry, as a testimony of the sincere regard and admiration, which 
they bear towards him, both as their Commanding Officer and as a private 
Grentleman. 

"Major Loftus suitably returned thanks, and later on Captain Girling when 
proposing the health of the non-commissioned officers and privates, con- 
gratulated them on the splendid testimonial it was their pleasure that day to 
confer upon their Major, which evidently spoke that kind and good feeling so 
desirable at all times between the Commander and the Commanded. 

" The Chairman of the evening, was Quarter-Master Wood of Morston." 



•Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry; 


: 1840. 


Major commanding 
A<^jutant 

Surgeon 


Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 
Thomas Andrews Girling 18 April 1831 

17 May 1837 Capt 
John Banks i Nov 1833 




HOLT TftOOP 




Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

55 rank and file 


John Thomas Mott 
John Brereton 
Thomas Boyd 

RAINHAM TROOP 


17 May 1837 
22 May 1835 
26 Aug 1 839 


Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

59 rank and file 


Henry Beraey Caldwell 
Theo. J. Russell Buckworth 
John Brown 

H INGHAM TROOP 


9 April 1838 

6 July 1839 

22 March 1839 


Captain 
Lieut 


Ferdinand Ives 
Paraell Robert Maillard 


9 April 1838 
18 May 1840 


Comet 

60 rank and file 


Denn Young 


12 Dec 1838 


Total 12 officers 

174 rank and file 





I84I. 

The Norfolk Chronicle, May 22nd, 1841, relates that:— "The Norfolk 

Yeomanry Cavalry, assembled under the command of Major Loftus, and 

the three troops marched into Norwich about six oclock in the evening, 

preceded by their brass band and having formed line in the Market Place, 



28o The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1841. 



the music playing ' God save the Queen/ the troops were dismissed to their 
quarters, and the gallant commandant and the officers repaired to the 
Norfolk Hotel. 

"The next morning this well appointed and soldier like corps 
assembled on the Castle Meadow and proceeded on their route to 
Yarmouth to perform a weeks permanent duty. 

'* On Sunday, the corps marched to St Nicholas Church, Yarmouth, on 
which occasion the Mayor, attended by the officers of the Corporation, 
and preceded by the r^alia, placed himself at their head, and led the way 
to the church, where divine service was performed and a sermon preached. 

'* In the evening, the officers entertained the Mayor (S. T. Palmer, Esq.), 
Lieut-Col. Kennedy, the Inspecting Officer, Captain Hunter, &a, of the 7th 
Royal Dragoon Guards, at dinner, at their mess (Royal Hotel). 

" Next day at three o'clock, Major Loftus rode on to the ground, when 
the Corps under the orders of that excellent officer. Captain Maillard, 
their Adjutant, were formed into line to receive the Inspecting Field 
Officer. At a quarter past three. Major Loftus rode down the line, and 
shortly after took his place in front of the Hingham troop, the centre. 
A few moments after this, open order was taken, and the Inspecting 
Officer, accompanied by his staff, presented himself before the troops, and 
was received with military honours, the brass band of the corps (whose 
musical proficiency does great credit to their able master, Mr. Jonas 
Wright, of Fakenham), playing ''God save the Queen." At this period 
there was a tremendous rush of people to gain a near view of the 
cavalry, but under the excellent arrangements made by the Mayor, and 
through the exemplary good conduct of the police, the ground was kept in 
the most orderly manner. The Inspecting Officer having gone down the 
line, proceeded to take up his position at the usual point, and the troops 
marched past him in squadrons with the gallant Major at their head. 

"The various evolutions were performed in a style, which, for both 
rapidity and precision, were the subject of astonishment and admiration 
with everyone present at all capable of appreciating the merit that 
belonged to them. 

"Lieut-CoL Kennedy at the conclusion of the field movements, called 
on the Major to answer some questions, relative to his duties ; and the 
interrogations having been answered to the Colonel's satisfaction, the 
officers of the corps were ordered to the front. The Inspecting Officer 
then closely questioned the Adjutant as to his competency to discharge the 
functions of his situation, and was pleased to express himself highly 
gratified at the manner in which Captain Maillard had replied to him. 
Captain Caldwell of the Rainham troop was next ordered to execute 



. 

V 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1841. 281 



some movements in front of the corps, the Lieut-Col. intimating in the 
most polite manner, that it formed part of his instructions particularly to 
ascertain the efficiency of the officers commanding troops ; the other two 
troops, Captain Motts and Ives passed through the same ordeal, and all 
appeared to give perfect satisfaction. At the conclusion of this part of 
his duty, the Lieut-Col. desired Major Loftus to form the corps into 
three sides of a square ; and an interesting scene ensued. 

''Lieut Buckworth of the Rainham troop had kindly undertaken to 
present the best swordsman of the corps with a prize sword. The list of 
those members who intended to compete for the same having been given 
in to the Major, they were called to the front The question of as to 
whom the prize should be given clearly lay between the Sergt Major 
(Mr. St Quinton, of Norwich), and the corporal on the left (Mr. Norton, 
of Holt), and so nearly were their respective merits balanced, that really 
not knowing whom to decide upon as the one worthy of preference, he 
proposed that they should each draw lots. This accordingly was done, and 
the fortunate individual was the Sergt Major." 

"On Friday evening. Major and Mrs. Loftus and the officers of the 
Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry gave a ball at the Bath rooms to the principal 
families of the town and neighbourhood. 

"On Monday there was a ball at the Town Hall at which the Mayor, 
Major Loftus, Mr. Edmund Preston, and Mr. Charles Palmer were stewards ; 
it was attended by the Mayor and Mrs. Palmer, Sir Henry and Lady 
Durrant, Major and Mrs. Loftus, Col. Kennedy and the officers of the 7th 
Dragoons, Capt and Mrs. Mott, Capt. and Mrs. Caldwell, Capt Ives, Capt. 
and Mrs. Maillard, Officers of the Yeomanry Cavalry, Capt and Mrs. Annesley, 
Capt and Mrs. S^ith, Capt and Mrs. Pullen, Lieut Eyton, R.N., Lieut. 
Kisbee, R.N., Mr. and Mrs. Mortlock Lacon, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Preston, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Palmer, Rev. Mr. Barling, Mr. and Mrs. G. D. 
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. L. Preston. Mrs. Stirhng Lacon, and about 
160 persons. Howlett's band was in attendance, and dancing was kept up 
with unusual spirit until a late hour. 

"On Tuesday morning the Norfolk Yeomanry bade farewell to our 
town, on their return to their rural abodes, and to their respective occupa- 
tions as civilians ; and it is only a tribute of justice, in conclusion to repeat, 
that the deportment of both officers and men was that steady, courteous 
and creditable kind, which will never fail to ensure them a welcome and 
cordial reception, should they again pay us a similar visit." 



282 The Records of the Yeomanry CavcUry of Norfolk, 1841-42. 



Charles Loftus, in "My Life," says: — 



"On the retirement of Sei^eant St. Quintin who went abroad, I 
appointed Corporal Donald Corry in his place. He had served in India, in 
the 24th Light Dragoons, for some years — was a most intelligent non- 
commissioned officer to me, besides being much respected by all the corps. 
He was a fine handsome man, with a soldierly bearing, and he served with 
me until the year 1849." 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry: 1841. 

Major commanding Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 

Adjutant Parnell Robert Maillard i Oct 1840 

Surgeon John Banks 1 Nov 1833 

HINOHAM TROOP 

Captain Ferdinand Ives 9 April 1838 

Lieut. George Brown Leak Knight 10 May 1841 

Comet Denn Young 12 Dec 1838 
66 rank and file 

HOLT TROOP 

Captain John Thomas Mott 17 May 1837 

Lieut John Brereton 22 May 183s 

Comet Thomas Boyd 26 Aug 1839 
60 rank and file 

RAINHAM TROOP 

Captain Henry Berney Caldwell 9 April 1838 

Lieut Theo. J. Russell Buck worth 6 July 1839 

Comet John Brown 22 March 1839 
58 rank and file 

Total 12 ofiicers 

184 rank and file 



1842. 
The Norfolk Chronicle, Febmary 12th, 1842, states: — 

'*That, on Monday, a division of the Hingham troop of the Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry, were summoned at short notice, by their Captain and 
marched to barracks, where they were drilled by Captain and Adjutant 
Maillard (formerly of the 'Royal Dragoons) in the riding school The soldier 
like appearance of this detachment and condition of their horses were much 
admired as they passed along the streets. The officers and other gentlemen 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1842. 283 



of the troop were afterwards invited to St. Catherine's Hill, to luncheon by 
Capt Ives ; after which the whole of the accoutrements and appointments were 
minutely inspected by Major Loftus, who expressed his satisfaction with the 
state thereof, and further observed how creditable it is to the county that this 
useful corps should be kept up as at the present time. Although the troops 
are on their march back, there have not of late been a dozen mounted dragoons 
within one hundred miles of Norwich, an evident proof of the confidence 
placed in this description of force by the Commander-in-Chief and the present 
Government" 

Again on June 4th, 1842, the same source relates that : — 

" On Saturday, the Rainham, Hingham, and Holt troops of Yeomanry 
Cavalry marched into SwafTham, for the performance of eight days permanent 
duty. The appearance of the respective troops and their equipments com- 
manded general admiration. 

" On Sunday morning, the three troops accompanied by their officers and 
band, attended Divine Service. 

^ On Tuesday evening, the theatre was fully attended, being the bespeak 
of Major Loftus and officers. The band of Major Loftus, by his kind 
permission performed various airs in the course of the evening. 

*'0n Wednesday, the gentlemen of SwafTham and its neighbourhood 
invited the officers to dinner at the Assembly rooms, at the conclusion of which 
the ball commenced, quadrille parties were formed, and the dancing kept up 
with great spirit till a late hour. 

*' Mr Wm Freeman of Billingford Sergeant in the Rainham troop won the 
prize at target shooting on Thursday." 

The following is an account of the week's duty : — 

'*0n Saturday, the Rainham troop, commanded by Capt. Caldwell, 
with Lieut. Buckworth and Cornet Brown ; the Hingham troop, commanded 
by Capt. Ives, with Lieut. Knight and Cornet Young. The Holt troop 
commanded by Capt. Mott with Lieut. Brereton and Comet Boyd, 
mustered at Litcham, and having been inspected by their gallant Major 
Charles Loftus, marched to SwafTham. 

*' Sunday, a general parade, for divine service. 

" Monday, a general parade, mounted for field exercise. An un- 
fortunate accident occurred this day by Mr Jacob Jary (of Capt. 
Caldwell's troop) horse falling in the charge. The rider was immediately 
attended to by the adjutant who caused the sufferer to be carried off the 
ground on hurdles into the town; when the surgeon on examination 
pronounced the case to be a dislocated hip. Every degree of care was 



2S4 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1842. 



bestowed upon him, by the medical attendants of Swaflfham, and thro 
their skill the dislocation was reduced, and Mr Jary we are happy to 
learn, is going on as well as possible. 

"Tuesday and Wednesday, each day a general parade mounted for 
field exercise. 

" Thursday, a general parade under arms ; after going through a field 
day on foot, the whole corps fired at the taiget, when Mr Wm Freeman, 
Sergeant of Capt. Caldwell's troop, was declared the winner of the prize, a 
purse of sovereigns, presented by the gentlemen of Swaflfham, which was 
delivered to him, by their gallant Major commandant. 

''Friday, a general parade mounted for inspection at 12 oclock. The 
general parade was formed on the usual ground by Major Loftus, and the 
inspecting officer, Lieut. Col. Brunton of the 13th Light Dragoons, was 
received with military honours. The colonel then made a very close 
inspection of every man and horse and their appointments ; then ordered 
Major Loftus to put the corps through some field movements. 

" And now a subject of acknowledged surprise and satisfaction to the 
iuspecting officer and spectators commenced. Major Loftus ordered the 
corps to march past first, with himself at their head ; they did so, then 
they ranked past in single files, and afterwards trotted past in half 
squadrons. These parade movements being over, they went through a 
regular field day under their worthy commandant, they then dismounted 
with their carbines, linked their horses together, and formed a general 
parade on foot with their horses in the rear. It was an extremely 
pleasing and interesting sight They then mounted again, and went 
through the whole of the sword exercise, afterwards a few from each troop 
were brought to the front for the inspecting officer to decide who was the 
best swordsman. Colonel Brunton selected corporal Stewardson of Capt. 
Caldwell's troop as the best swordsman, when Major Loftus handed him a 
handsome sword as the prize from Capt. Mott, addressing him in an 
eloquent and feeling speech, wherein he did not forget to mention Capt* 
Mott for his spirit of liberality and kindness towards the corps. The 
corps then formed square when Colonel Brunton placed himself in the 
centre and addressed them thus: 

"Major Loftus, officers, and gentlemen of the Norfolk Yeomanry 
cavalry; I had been led to entertain high expectations respecting this 
corps from what I had heard, but your performance this day has really 
astonished me; I am not only astonished at the order and discipline you 
display, but am equally gratified at the soldier-like manner in which 
you are equipped. The precision of all your movements in the field, I 
attribute to the good command you are under, to your respective officers. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1842. 285 



and above all the silent steadiness in your ranks is what I did not 
expect to find. I now gentlemen, congratulate you on the impression 
you have made on my mind this day, which shall be faithfully conveyed 
to the Horse Guards. 

'* We are sorry to learn that owing to indisposition this corps were 
deprived of the services of a zealous soldier in the gallant Capt. Ives. 
His troop was commanded by Lieut. Knight, who supplied the captain's 
place with much credit We are happy to hear Mr. J. Jary who met 
with an accident in the field, continues to do well. 

'' By the kindness of T. R. Buckworth, Esq., a portion of Cley field 
was appropriated to the use of the Yeomanry during their stay. The 
town was much enlivened during the week, by the band of the corps, 
which played admirably and delighted all who heard it." 



Norfolk Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry 


: 1842. 


Major commanding 


Charles Loftus 


9 April 1838 


Adjutant 


Parnell Robert Maillard 


I Oct 1840 


Surgeon 


John Banks 

RAIMHAM '*A** TROOP 


I Nov 1833 


Captain 


Henry Berney Caldwell 


9 April 1838 


Lieut 


Theo. J. Russell Buckworth 


6 July 1839 


Cornet 


John Brown 


22 March 1839 


71 rank and file 


HINGHAM "b" troop 




Captain 


Ferdinand Ives 


9 April [838 


Lieut. 


George Brown Leak Knight 


10 May 1841 


Cornet 


Denn Young 


12 Dec 1838 


61 rank and file 


HOLT "C" TROOP 




Captain 


John Thomas Mott 


17 May 1837 


Lieut 


John Brereton 


22 May 1835 


Cornet 


Thomas Boyd 


26 Aug 1839 


58 rank and file 






Total 12 officers 






190 rank and file 





In 1842, Her Majesty was pleased to allow the Norfolk Yeomanry to 
be styled " Prince Albert's Own Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry," which was 
announced to th^ officer commanding in a letter from Lord Wodehouse, 
the Lord-Lieutenant of the county, which gratified all concerned greatly. 



286 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavidry of Norfolk, 1843. 



1843. 
Th& Norfolk Chronicle, May 14th, 1843, observes: — "That Lieut. G. B. 
L. Knight of Framingham has been appointed a captain in the Norfolk 
Yeomanry cavalry, in roona of Capt. Ives resigned. This fine body of 
men, which under their gallant and zealous commandant, Major Loftus, 
with the officers under him including their able and experienced adjutant 
Capt. Maillard, has attained a proficiency in discipline little, if at all 
inferior to that of troops of the line, are, we understand to assemble at 
Fakenham on the 13 th inst, for eight days training and exercise ; and we 
learn that the three troops have for some time been preparing for that 
service in their respective cantonments." 



The same paper also on May 27th, 1843, relates : — 

'* The three troops of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry commanded by Major 
Loftus marched into Fakenham, pursuant to orders, for eight days training and 
exercise. 

'' On the following day, the corps attended divine service at the parish 
church, of the above mentioned market town, and on Monday, they 
commenced their field exercises. On Tuesday, the i6th this was continued 
under the instruction of Captain Maillard, adjutant, (the gallant commandant 
of the troops, being unfortunately too much indisposed to take the duties 
df the drill), on the 17th, Wednesday, field exercise was resumed under Major 
Loftus. 

'' At the close of the drill, rain began to fall ; and it was gratifying to see 
the quickness with which the cloaks were unrolled and put on, by the members 
of the corps, whilst on their horses. 

"On the 1 8th (Thursday) owing to the extreme wetness of the morning 
there was only a short drill. 

*'On Friday (19th} the corps was inspected by Lord Wodehouse, (Lord- 
Lieutenant of the county) and Lieut. Colonel Clarke of the Scots Greys. After 
the inspection, about 30 gentlemen of the corps came to the front of the line, 
for the purpose of contending with each other for a prize sword, presented by 
Capt. Caldwell, to the best swordsman in the three troops — the question of 
superior excellence on this point to be decided by Colonel Clarke. On this 
occasion the sword exercise was exceedingly well gone through by all the 
competitors ; and so difficult was the task of adjudging that the colonel was 
obliged to select three gentlemen from among the competitors to perform it 
again ; their names are Mr William Freeman, sergeant in Captain Caldwell's 
troop, Mr Norton of Captain Mott's troop, Mr Lacey of Capt Knight's troop. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1843. 287 



Mr Norton was declared to be the best swordsman, and Captain Caldwell came 
forward, and delivered the prize sword, accompanying its presentation with a 
suitable speech to Mr Norton. 

'' Colonel Clarke having completed his duty of inspection, addressed the 
major commandant, officers, and gentlemen of the Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry, 
in the most handsome as well as appropriate terms. He observed that their 
performances that day had at once surprised and gratified him, he said the 
corps was a credit to their county, and he should have the happiness to make 
his report to her Majesty's Government accordingly. In conclusion the 
inspecting field officer said — Gentlemen, I congratulate you ; and I most 
particularly notice your exemplary silence, both on parade and whilst you were 
going through your various movements. At six oclock, the whole corps, 
officers and men, sat down to dinner in one room at the Crown. The 
repast was served up in good style by Mr Stoughton, landlord of that inn. 

''After dinner, Captain Caldwell's troop presented that excellent officer 
with a handsome piece of plate, in token of their high esteem for him, on 
account not only of his soldier like conduct to all under him, but also of his 
high character as a county gentleman of Norfolk. 

''On Saturday (the 20th inst.) the corps assembled on a dismounted 
parade to fire for a prize carbine, presented by Major Loftus to the best shot, 
which prize was won by Mr White of Captain Mott's troop. This carbine of 
honour was presented to the successful competitor by the gallant Major, with 
his characteristic warmth of kindly expression, and after a short address to his 
officers and men, replete with the same good feeling, he dismissed the ' corps, 
whose conduct is in every respect deserving of praise. Indeed when 
consideration is had to the fact that these gentlemen have very little time to 
bestow on the duties of drill, we cannot refrain from remarking that the 
greatest credit is due to all, for the extraordinary precision with which their 
marchings on foot are executed, keeping step and time to the music of their 
band, as if they were a corps of infantry." 



The Norfolk Chronicle, October 28th, 1843, contains the following : — 

"The Prince Alberts own Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry. 

''On Monday last this fine body of men assembled in review order, at 
East Dereham, by command of the Lord-Lieutenant of the county, for the 
purpose of receiving a standard, in commemoration of the honour conferred 
upon them by His Royal Highness Prince Albert, in allowing the corps to be 
called after his name. 



288 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 843. 



*^ The morning though cloudy ushered in a ddightfui day ; and from an 
early hour numbers of the yeomanry continued to arrive from almost every 
part of the county, especially the Western division. Before ten o'clock the 
whole town was in motion, many of the gentry of the neighbourhood, and from 
a distance, arrived in the course of the forenoon, whilst hundreds of spectators 
lined the Market Place, to witness the military array ; the Hingham troop was 
drawn up before the King's Arms inn, the Rainham troop before the Eagle ; 
and the Holt troop before the Geoi^e inn, when the whole body was collected 
tc^ether, it had a most imposing appearance, as it consists chiefly of fine young 
men, who, in their martial dress and accoutrements, looked more like regularly 
trained soldiers than any yeomanry we have seen ; and we have witnessed such 
field days in many counties. The Helmets which formerly were fronted with a 
maltese cross, now exhibited the Royal Arms, in consequence of the troops, (as 
our readers already know) being styled " Prince Alberts Own Corps " in other 
respects there was no difference in the equipments. It was generally remarked 
that the whole body was well mounted, all the horses being in good condition. 

** Soon after twelve oclock, the three troops left the town, and rode into a 
field belonging to W. W. Lee Warner Esq, where they formed Into line; 
the part of the field allotted for the review was marked out with flags, the rest 
being occupied by the spectators, who were very numerous ; many occupying 
carriages of every description, numbers being on horseback, and still greater 
numbers on foot ; amongst the company we observed — 

^ Sir H. Durrant Bart and Lady ; Capt Stracey and Lady ; W. W. Lee 
Warner Esq and Lady ; J. D. Hay Hill Esq of Gressenhall ; the Rev. W* 
WoUaston of Dereham ; the Rev. Hen. CoUison ; the Rev. C. H. WoUaston of 
Dereham ; the Rev. C. Ash of Brisley ; the Rev. W. Girling of Seaming ; B. 
Grirling Esq of Dereham ; H. Edwards of Hardingham ; Mr Bidwell of 
Dereham ; Mrs Stoughton and family of Aylsham ; Mrs Drosier and Mrs 
Jackson ; the Rev. E. Kemp and many others ; all the officers of the corps 
were on the ground, namely, Major Chas Loftus, commandant, whose activity 
and gallant bearing elicited great admiration ; Capt. Caldwell, Lieut Buckworth, 
and Cornet Freeman of the Rainham troop ; Capt Knight, Lieut. Blake, and 
Cornet Young of the Hingham troop ; Capt Mott, Lieut Brereton and Comet 
Boyd of the Holt troop ; also the able adjutant Capt Maillard ; and the 
indefatigable regimental sergeant major St Quinton ; the surgeon, Mr J. Banks 
of Holt was prevented attending in consequence of indisposition. 

'' The line was formed as before stated, to receive the commandant Major 
Loftus, who put the troops through their evolutions in his usual officer-like 
style — the band playing at intervals, commencing with " God save the Queen." 

'* About one oclock a detachment was sent to escort the Lord- Lieutenant 
to the ground. This detachment, which was under the command of Lieut 



The Records of the Yeomanry CavcUry of Norfolk, 1843. 289 



Buckworth, soon returned preceded by the noble Lord, who was attended by 
Major Girling, in staff uniform, acting as his Lordship's aide-de-camp, and also 
accompanied by Colonel Mason and Colonel Blomfield. 

'' The new standard ^was now brought into the field and attracted much 
attention. This military ensign, the work of Serjt-Major St Quinton, was 
made of rich scarlet silk, with a deep gold fringe, and two handsome tassels, 
the right side was emblazoned with the royal arms ; on the reverse was an 
inscription, within the words ' Prince Alberts Own/ encircled with a wreath of 
oak and laurel ; on each side of the wreath, there was a ribbon in gold bearing 
the words, ' Presented by the Right Hon. Lord Wodehouse,' and underneath 
the date ' 1843 ' — The staff elegantly ornamented, was between eight or 
nine feet in length. 

*'The troops having received the Lord-Lieutenant in line, and given a 
salute, then formed three sides of a square, with the noble Lord, Major 
Girling, and the escort in the centre. The new standard was then presented 
to the corps, after which the Lord-Lieutenant, addressing the troops, said 

*' Major Loftus, officers, non-commissioned officers, and members of 
Prince Alberts Own Corps — I think twelve years have now elapsed, since 
I first had the honour, of inspecting this body of yeomanry; since that 
time I have often seen these troops, and I have had the greatest satisfaction 
of inspecting a corps that does such honour to the county. I have 
never, however, had such great pleasure in addressing them as at this 
present moment, in which I have the honour to present the colours, in 
consequence of the compliment and high distinction, that his Royal 
Highness Prince Albert has conferred upon this corps. It may be asked 
what does Prince Albert know about the Norfolk Yeomanry? Certainly, 
they are not known by personal observation to his Royal Highness ; but 
that illustrious personage has done me the high honour of relying on 
the report that I made to him, respecting their efficiency and discipline. 
When I requested his Royal Highness to do the Norfolk Yeomanry this 
honour, I remarked that this body was in a high state of discipline, that 
the officers, and men were remarkable for their zeal, that the whole of the 
men were well mounted and fit for any kind of service. If the corps 
did not deserve this character; which I am confident it does, I should be 
the person to blame in making the recommendation; but I would not 
have said any such thing if the corps was not in every respect worthy of 
the high character I gave it, without derogating in the least degree from 
the general high character and efficiency of this body of Yeomanry, I must 
venture to state, that I think the person to whom the corps is mainly 
indebted for this honour, is the commandant Major Loftus. In every 
corps, its efficiency, and value, and discipline, must, in a great measure, 

T 



290 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1843-44. 

depend * on the commandant ; he is the main spring to put the corps in 
motion, and on him everything dependsL Being such a commandant, I 
trust that he will long remain at the head of this corps; and I am 
confident, that you will justify the high honour conferred upon you. 

"The noble Lord having concluded, Major Loftus acknowledged in a 
suitable manner." 



Prince Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1843. 



Major commanding 


Charles Loftus 


9 April 1838 


Adjutant 


Pamell Robert Maillard 


I Oct 1840 


Surgeon 


John Banks 

RAINHAM TROOP 


I Nov 1833 


Captain 


Henry Bemey Caldwell 


9 April 1838 


Lieut 


Theo. J. Russell Buckworth 


6 July 1839 


Cornet 


William Freeman 


Oct 1843 


82 rank and file 


BINGHAM TROOP 




Captain 


George Brown Leak Knight 


10 May 1841 


Lieut 


William Jex Blake 


I May 1843 


Comet 


Denn Young 


12 Dec 1838 


61 rank and file 


HOLT TROOP 




Captain 


John Thomas Mott 


17 May 1837 


Lieut 


John Brereton 


22 May 1835 


Cornet 


Thomas Boyd 


26 Aug 1839 


68 rank and file 






Total 12 officers 






211 rank and file 





1844. 
On May i8th, 1844, the Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry commenced eight 
days' permanent duty at Holt, and the Norfolk Chronicle thus relates the 
incident : — 



''Last year we had the gratification of witnessing the presentation by 
the Lord-Lieutenant, of a new Standard to this fine body of men and of 
recording the distinguished honour conferred upon them by his Royal 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1844. 291 



Highness Prince Albert, by giving them the title of Prince Albert's Own, 
as a mark of his royal favour and approbation. This distinction so well 
bestowed has served to stimulate the Corps to attain greater proficiency in 
military exercises. On May i8th the three troops entered the town of 
Holt for eight days duty, in which they maintained their former high 
character of discipline, a character confirmed and established by repeated 
declarations of inspecting officers. 

" On Sunday, the troops attended divine service at the Church, when 
a most excellent sermon was preached by the Rev. H. Jackson. Monday 
and Tuesday were two field days, when the various exercises were gone 
through. On Wednesday there was a dismounted drill under arms. On 
Thursday, there was a mounted drill, when in full marching order, with the 
customary movements, which were performed with remarkable precision 
and reflected the highest credit on the troops. Friday was a field-day, and 
it having been announced that a review would take place under the 
inspection of Lieut Colonel Daly of the 4th Light Dragoons, early in the 
day the town was filled with people from the neighbouring towns; every 
inn had numerous guests. 

''At eleven o'clock the three troops were drawn up in the Market 
Place, opposite the Feathers Inn, the usual preliminaries having been gone 
through, the troops proceeded to the race-course. There could not have 
been a more suitable place selected for a military display. 

"The troops having formed into line in open order, presented a very 
creditable and soldierlike appearance. The Rainham troop commanded by 
Captain Caldwell, occupied the right The Hingham troop commanded 
by Captain Knight, occupied the centre. The Holt troop commanded by 
Captain Mott, occupied the left Lieut Colonel Daly and suite arrived on 
the ground about one o'clock, accompanied by Major Girling as aide-de- 
camp, Mr Banks the surgeon, and others. Lieut Colonel Daly being 
received with a salute, rode along the line, inspecting the appointments of 
the men ; he then directed the troops to be put through their evolutions, 
much to his satisfaction. The corps then formed for sword exercise under 
the direction of Captain and Adjutant Maillard. The exercise was 
admirably performed. Captain Knight offered a prize-sword, to be 
contended for by any member of the troops not previously winning a 
prize ; the candidates were called to the front and exercised by fugle. The 
Lieut Colonel selecting two men he considered best, and ultimately decided 
in favour of William Stimson of Barton Bendish. 

'' Captain Knight then presented the sword to Mr Stimson, saying, — 

" * I have great pleasure in presenting this sword, which you have won, 
I wish you may live long to use it' 



292 The Records of the Yeomamry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1844. 



"A dinner was given by the non-commissioned officers and privates 
to Major Loftus ; it was served at the Town Hall, by Mr Parkes of the 
Feathers Inn ; Quarter-Master G. Wood presiding, and proposing the health 
of Major Loftus, who returned thanks. Other toasts were drank, songs 
were sung, and the evening passed very agreeably. The following day the 
corps assembled in the Market Place ; after being addressed by the Major, 
and thanked by him for their soldier-like appearance, were dismissed 
amidst hearty cheers.** 



Charles Loftus, in "* My life,** says : — 

** Meanwhile, I did my utmost to get the corps under my command in 
good order, in which I was supported by the willingness of die members, 
aided by the assistance of the officers and non-commissioned officers. I 
received valuable aid from Mr St Quintin, of Norwich, who rendered me 
good service in teaching the men the sword exercise. I had changed the 
pistol for tiie carbine, perceiving the former weapon to be useless if called 
upon to act on foot or even on mounted service. To promote excellence 
in the use of this weapon, I gave a prize of a handsome sword at the 
conclusion of our )rearly duty ; likewise, for the best shot, either a 
subscription purse or a fowlingpiece. This stimulated all to exert them- 
selves to excel in the use of the sword and carbine. I used to meet the 
men in companies, twenty or thirty at a time, living so far apart, when 
it suited their convenience. Sergeant St Quintin won the first prize sword 
(which was my gift in the first instance, and was followed up by one of 
the officers in succeeding years) at Yarmouth. Sergeant Freeman won 
the first carbine prize, a purse of ten sovereigns at Swaffham. The two 
following years I presented a handsome carbine of a new construction by 
Westley and Richards — ^which it was thought would have been introduced 
into the cavalry — ^won by a member of the Holt troop, commanded by 
Captain Mott This carbine had a spring, which contained forty copper 
caps. After firing, you pulled back this spring, and it deposited a fresh 
cap on the nipple, saving time in searching for one from the pouch. I 
must not omit Mr Geoi^e Riches, of Sherford, one of the sergeants of the 
Raynham troop, who was a most excellent and attentive person, and had 
served with me in the Norfolk Rangers, from which I never knew him 
absent on any one occasion when either they or the Yeomanry were called 
out He rode well, and possessed several good horses, particularly a steady 
grey mare. And this reminds me that one of my Raynham young men 
told me that he had been to Norwich, and had purchased a horse belonging 
to the Greys quartered there ; ' that now he had a horse he was sure 
would know his duty.' He was certainly a fine looking animal, and his 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cofvalry of Norfolk, 1 844. 293 



owner was much pleased with his bargaia He had given eleven pounds for 
him on the Castle Hill, where the cast horses were generally sold ere the 
regiment quitted. I hoped he would find htm satisfactory ; but some of 
these for sale are queer ones. 

" * Lor, sir, he is as quiet as a lamb, and goes well in harness, too.' 

***The troop meets next week. Bring him out' 

''It was a Spring meeting on Hempton Green, where they assembled 
before going on permanent duty. Captain Buckworth commanded that 
day. I watched the proceedings as they marched and trotted past in 
divisions. The rider of the grey had been told off as one of the skirmishers 
blank cartridge being served out to all. 

*' ' Skirmishers to the front 1 ' when the others dashed out, but the grey 
moved not I saw his owner spurring him to get him to the front, but not 
one inch would he move. The captain called to him — 

"•To the front!' 

" * Dash it. Captain, I cannot get him to move, sir ! ' said the owner of the 
grey, in tones of despair and vexation, nor would he stir from the side of his 
companion by any persuasion. *Poor fellow/ thought I, 'you are done I' 
Some laughed at his expense — no one pitied him. The horse was useful in the 
farm and in harness, but the handsome ci-devant grey of the Greys never 
appeared more in that military field." 



MCE Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : i 


Major commanding 


Charles Loftus 


9 April 1838 


Adjutant 


Parnell Robert Maillard 


I Oct 1840 


Surgeon 


John Banks 

RAINHAM TROOP 


I Nov 1833 


Captain 


Henry Berney Caldwell 


9 April 1838 


Lieut 


Thea J. Russell Buckworth 


6 July 1839 


Comet 


William Freeman 


Oct 1843 


66 rank and file 


HINGHAM TROOP 




Captain 


Thomas Beauchamp Proctor 


22 Oct 1844 


Lieut 


WilUam Jex Blake 


I May 1843 


Cornet 


Denn Young 


12 Dec 1838 


39 rank and file 


HOLT TROOP 




Captain 


John Thomas Mott 


17 May 1837 


Lieut 


John Brereton 


22 May 183s 


n 


Thomas Boyd 


22 Oct 1844 


68 rank and file 






Total 12 officers 






173 rank and file 







294 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1845. 



1845. 

The Norfolk Chronicle of May loth, 1845, relates that:— "^ The three 
troops of the Prince Albert's Own Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry, marched into 
East Dereham on Saturday, the 3rd inst, under the command of Major Charles 
Loftus, for eight days permanent duty. They assembled in the following 
Older ; the Rainham and Holt troops mustered at Elmham King's Head at one 
o'clock ; the Hingham and Loddon near Quebec House, at which place the 
whole corps united, and marched into Dereham, preceded by the band. The 
officers held their mess at the King's Arms Hotel. 

** On Sunday the 4th, the corps paraded dismounted in the Market place 
to attend divine service ; and owing to the excellent arrangements made by the 
rector were very well accommodated in the church. 

^ On Monday, the 5th, the corps paraded in the Market Place at noon, 
mounted, and proceeded to a field a little more than a mile from the town for 
exercise ; the weather was very wet and unfavourable and was the cause of 
greatly abridging the time for drill and exercise. 

** On Tuesday, the 6th, the corps paraded as on the previous day ; and we 
regret to have to record an unfortunate accident, which happened to Capt 
Beauchamp Procter, of the Hingham and Loddon troop ; he received a severe 
kick from a horse, which deprived the corps of his valuable services for the 
remainder of the term of exercise. 

*' On Wednesday the 7th, the corps paraded as usual in the Market place, 
and proceeded to the field for exercise ; an hour after reaching it, the weather 
became so much worse than usual, that the Major commandant returned with 
the corps to quarters, after a short drill. 

** Thursday, the 8th, fortunately turned out a dry day, and the corps, which 
proceeded from the Market place, to the field, were enabled to execute several 
movements, entirely to the commanding officers satisfaction ; and it was the 
only chance afforded them on the last four days for a sufficient time to drill, in 
preparation for the review, which was fixed for the day following. It is 
necessary to observe, that in addition to the interruptions from wet weather, the 
corps had received since the events of last year, a very considerable number of 
recruits, who it was not possibly fully to instruct ; although on their part the 
greatest zeal and attention was shewn. 

" On Friday, the 9th, the corps again paraded in the Market place, and 
reached the field of exercise by mid-day, the hour appointed by Lieut-Col. 
Whyte of the 7th Hussars, who arrived on the ground about half an hour after- 
wards, attended by Cornet Freeman, of the Rainham troop. He was received 
with the usual honours, passed down the line, and then resumed his station for 
the corps to march past, which they did in the following order ; by squadrons 
at a walk ; ranked past ; trotted past by half squadrons ; then took up their 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1845. ^95 



original ground and executed several movements, charging front, close column, 
deploying into line, etc At the termination of the movements, the inspecting 
officer took the Rainham troop, with Capt Buckworth, apart from the others, 
and had some troop movements ; he afterwards directed the adjutant, (Capt T. 
A. Girling) to drill the Holt and Hingham troop, which was done to his entire 
satisfaction. The line was again formed by the commanding officer who having 
advanced, gave the general salute, and thus concluded the field day. 

'* Lieut-Col. Whyte having left the ground, Major Loftus formed the troops 
into three sides of a hollow square, and communicated the inspecting officers 
sentiments, which he did not hesitate to say were satisfactory; particularly 
observing that the corps were a very fine body of men, well mounted and 
equipped, and fit for any service that might be required of them, (the corps then 
marched back and were dismissed.) The day turning out very fine, brought a 
great concourse of people on the ground, which had a very pleasing effect 

" On Saturday the loth, the corps paraded at nine oclock, mounted, and 
proceeded to a small field near the town, to perform the sword exercise, and to 
contend for a prize sword ; which after a long trial, was awarded to Corporal 
Grood, of the Rainham troop, and presented to him by Major Loftus, with a 
suitable address ; the corps then returned to the Market Place, and just after 
Major Loftus had thanked them for their good conduct, and before separating 
to their respective homes, they gave him three hearty cheers. It is but justice 
to say, that the inhabitants of Dereham, during the stay of the corps, behaved 
with much kindness. 

^ On the Wednesday, there was a concert by the band, patronized by Lord 
and Lady Wodehouse, and the officers of the corps. It was well attended, and 
passed off with much credit to the band-master, Mr Wright of Fakenham. 

'' On Friday, the officers entertained Colonel Oakes, Lieut-Col. Stracey, the 
Rev. W. Wollaston Girling, and several gentlemen of the town and neighbour- 
hood to dinner, and in the evening attended the theatre, which was opened for 
that night by Mr Smith and was well filled. On entering the box. Major 
Loftus was very cordially greeted and cheered by a crowded audience. This 
ended a very pleasant sojourn of the Prince Albert's Own Norfolk Yeomanry 
cavalry with the good people of Dereham." 



296 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1845-46. 



Prince Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1845. 

Major commanding Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 

Adjutant Thomas Andrews Girling 22 Oct 1844 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 



Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

71 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

59 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

47 rank and file 



RAINHAM TROOP 

Tbeo. J. Russell Buckworth 
Denn Young 
William Freeman 

HOLT TROOP 

William R. Haggard 
Thomas Boyd 
Greorge Wood 

HIMOHAM AND LODDON TROOP 

Thomas Beauchamp Proctor 
Bertram W. Currie 
Lord John Wodehouse 



25 March 1845 



»i tt 



M 



Oct 1843 



25 March 1845 

22 Oct 1844 

25 March 1845 



22 Oct 1844 
25 March 1845 



» 



It 



Total 12 officers 

177 rank and file 



1846. 

The Norfolk Chronicle of May i6th, 1846, relates that the 

'* Prince Albert's own corps of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry, enlivened 
Cromer by their sojoum in it, for eight days permanent duty. On Friday 
week the three troops assembled on Roughton common, in complete marching 
order, and firom thence entered this town; they formed line in Church 
street, and were soon after dismissed to their respective billets. 

''On Sunday moming the general parade was formed in Golden 
street for attending divine service. 

''The officers of this corps besides Major Loftus, the esteemed com- 
mandant, were on this occasion ; Capt. Buckworth, Lieut. Young and Cornet 
Freeman of the Rainham troop: Capt Boyd and Cornet Wood of the 
Holt troop; Lieut Young with Lieut. Currie commanded the Hingham 
troop. Major Girling, the worthy adjutant of the corps we regret to state 
was very unwell during the week, and consequently unable to be present at 
the field of exercise for more than one day, though he attended morning 
drills. 



I. — Norfolk Rangers, circa 1783, in poiseuion of Sir W, ffolka. 
a. — Norfolk Light Horse, 1863, i« postession of Lttut.-Col. J. R. Harvey. 
3, — Norfolk Yeomanry, 1835, in possession of Mr. Wells, Si. Andrew's, Norwich. 
4. — Prince Albert's Own Norfolk Yeomanry, 1843, in possession of Mr. Wells, 
St, Andreii/s, Norwich. 




5- — Sword of 3rd Regt Norfolk Yeomanry, i8ao, « possesHon of Lteul.-Coi. 

J. Ji. Harvey. 
6. — See page 85. 

7. — Officei's Pouch of 3rd Regt Norfolk Yeomanry, 1810, in possession of IJtut.-Col. 
J. R. Han-ey. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavairy of Norfolk^ i846» 297 



''On Monday the three troops were assembled at eight o'clock 
punctually for foot drill, carbine and sword practise under their respective 
captains, and at nine o'clock were formed by the adjutant Girling, for the 
Major's inspection in Garden street Soon after twelve o'clock the troops 
assembled in drill order, mounted, and proceeded to a field, about two 
miles from the town kindly furnished for the occasion by Mr Clarke of 
Felbrigg. 

" On Tuesday, the same order for drill in the morning was issued, and 
executed, and at noon the corps mustered as on the previous day, mounted. 

^On Wednesday, the corps were early in the field, and returned to 
quarters soon after two o'clock. 

** Friday, being the day appointed by the government for the inspection 
of the corps, a lai^e concourse of people gathered together, from all parts 
to witness the evolutions. Among the company, was W. H. Windham, Esq, 
of Felbrigg Hall ; the Hon. Edw. Wodehouse and Mrs Wodehouse ; the Rev. 
Mr and Mrs A. Keppel ; Mr and Mrs Holley ; Mrs Boyd of Holt Lodge ; 
the Rev. J. Partridge and family ; Mr and Mrs Ransome ot Holt ; Mr 
J ex Blake; Mr Knight; Capt. Ives and lady; and several persons oi 
distinction in the county. 

"Soon after eleven o'clock the corps marched intx> the field under 
command of the Major, and formed line ready to receive the inspecting 
officer, Lieut-Col. Smith of the Royal Horse Guards Blue, who was sent 
from London specially to inspect the corps. The most able arrangements 
for keeping the giound were made by superintendent of the police and his 
assistants ; and the mounted guard was kindly furnished by Capt. Windham 
of the Royal Navy, who attended in his uniform, and took great pains in 
giving the necessary orders so that this duty was effected in the most 
judicious manner without giving the slightest offence to any person. Soon 
after twelve o^clock, the inspecting field officer made his appearance in front 
of the corps and was received with a general salute, the band striking up 
'God save the Queea' After passing down the line and taking up his 
position, the corps marched past by squadrons, ranked past by single files 
trotted past by troops and formed line. The Major then advanced the 
corps in line and retired by threes from the right of squadrons, and formed 
line again upon their original ground, advancing in double open columns, 
from the centre and formed line to the left, advanced and changed front 
right back; threw out skirmishers to the front, the firing from whom waa 
kept up very briskly for some time, when the recall was sounded ; the whole 
line then advanced, made a most excellent charge and retired ; again 
advanced by echelon of squadrons from the right, and formed line to the 
left, advanced by threes from the right of the squadrons, formed divisions. 



298 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 846. 



troops and squadrons, baited and threiv out dismounted skirmishers, this 
movement elicited the warmest praises from all who witnessed it, as did 
likewise the mounted practice ; the skirmishers having been recalled, the 
line was thrown back and the whole advanced in review order, the band 
playing, halted, gave a general salute, which finished the field day. Lieut- 
Col. Smith then rode up to Major Loftus, and requested he would com- 
municate to the officers, non-commissioned officers and privates, that having 
been appointed to inspect the corps under his command, he should feel 
the greatest pleasure in being able to give a most favourable report to the 
Horse Guards, not only of the excellent state of the clothing, arms, and 
accoutrements of the corps, the fine appearance of the men and horses, but 
that he should likewise state his entire satisfaction at their good order 
and discipline, which reflected the highest credit upon alL 

^ The weather was all that could be desired for the review, and during 
the whole day there was an immense concourse of people on the ground, 
who appeared much gratified by this military display. 

"The Head quarters of the corps were at the New Inn, where Mr. 
Boulter provided every accommodation for the troop. 

""The mess dinners were excellent, and included all the good things 
of the season. The charges at the same time were very reasonable. 

^On Thursday, the mm-commissioned officers and several of the in- 
habitants of the town and neighbourhood dined with the officers at the 
New Inn, in accordance with the usual custom. 

'*On Friday, the officers and a party of friends, dined at the Hotel 
de Paris, where Mr Sepping provided an excellent repast 

*" The regimental band conducted by Mr. Jonas Wright, of Fakenham, 
performed every evening at the mess, and contributed greatly to the 
amusement of the inhabitants. 

<*On Wednesday evening by desire of Major Loftus and the officers, 
there was a concert in Mrs Rusts Rooms, under the able superintendance 
of the band-master before a large and respectable audience. Miss Morris 
of Norwich, and Mr Fitzgerald of the band, assisted by several glee singers, 
sustained the vocal performances, and several of their songs were encored. 
The instrumentalists performed the pieces assigned to them admirably, 
and the concert went off" with great ^clat 

^ On Saturday morning, the corps paraded mounted ; and in a small 
field adjoining the town; and after being addressed by their worthy 
Major, and giving some hearty cheers at the conclusion of the speech; 
the troops separated for their respective homes.'' 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1846-47. 299 



Prince Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1846. 



Major commanding^ Charles Loftus 

Adjutant Thomas Andrews Girling 

Surgeon John Banks 



9 April 1838 

22 Oct 1844 

I Nov 1833 



RAINHAM TROOP 



Theo. J. Russell Buck worth 25 March 1845 
Denn Young „ „ „ 

William Freeman Oct 1843 

HINGHAM AND LODDON TROOP 

Bertram W. Currie 25 March 1845 

Lord John Wodehouse „ „ „ 

HOLT TROOP 

Captain Thomas Boyd 

Lieut 

Cornet George Wood 25 March 1845 
57 rank and file 

Total 10 officers 

176 rank and file 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Cornet 

68 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

53 rank and file 



On May 22nd, 1847, the Norfolk Chronicle relates that: — 



1847. 



" The town of Wells is at this time very gay, being honoured by a visit 
from the gentlemen comprising Prince Albert's Own corps of Yeomanry 
cavalry. They entered the town on Saturday last, under the command of 
Major Loftus, and the lovers of music are day by day enchanted by their 
splendid brass band 

"On Wednesday the officers entertained the Lord-Lieutenant of the 
county to a sumptuous dinner, at the Crown Inn, their head quarters, and in 
the evening they all adjourned to a well-conducted and very full concert, at the 
British school room, patronized by the Earl and Countess of Leicester, Major 
Loftus and the officers of the corps. 

" Their practising ground is on the North lawn in Holkham Park." 

The same paper again states on May agtb, 1847 : — 

*'We mentioned in our last weeks paper, the arrival at Wells, of the 



300 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1847. 

Prince Albert's own corps of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry, for eight days 
permanent duty, on Saturday the 15th inst. 

" On Sunday morning, the troops paraded for divine service and marched 
to church. At the conclusion of the service, owing to the unpropitious state 
of the weather they were dismissed to their quarters. 

''On Monday the 17th the three squadrons mustered for exercise and 
marched to Holkham Park, permission having been granted to Major Loftus 
by the Earl of Leicester, to make any use of the Park for exercise, likewise 
the stables at the Hall for the accommodation of the horses during his sojourn 
at Wells, with the corps under his command. At two oclock the corps were 
dismounted, and at this period, the Major received a most polite invitation for 
himself and his brother officers to luncheon at the Hall. Shortly after three 
odocky the troops returned to quarters, the officers dined at the Crown Inn, 
and the band played during dinner in Leicester square, formerly the But- 
landsL 

*' On Tuesday, at ten o'clock, the corps again marched to the Park, and 
after going through various evolutions, until 2 p.m. dismounted. The officers 
received an invitation to the Hall to luncheon, a marquee being erected in the 
Park for the accommodation of the men, in which refreshments were provided, 
and at three o'clock they returned to town. In the evening, the officers dined 
with Mr Hugh Rump, who entertained them at his house with true old English 
hospitality, the band playing on the lawn to the delight of all within hearing. 

" At an early hour on Wednesday morning, the corps assembled in the 
Park at Holkham, and returned to quarters shortly after two o'clock. At 5 p.m. 
a guard of honour was formed for the reception of the Lord-Lieutenant of the 
county, the Earl of Leicester, who had accepted an invitation to dine with the 
officers at mess. Captain Buckworth, Lieutenant Young and Comet William 
Wood were the officers with the guard of honour. Precisely at half past five 
the Earl arrived accompanied by the Hon. and Rev. Thomas Keppel, and were 
received with all military honoura At eight o'clock the Lord-Lieutenant 
accompanied by Major Loftus, and the officers proceeded to the concert room^ 
which was crowded to excess, and it is but justice to state that owing to the 
excellent arrangements made by Mr Jonas Wright, the band master, the 
company assembled enjoyed a musical treat, not often met with in a provincial 
town. 

" On Thursday morning there was a short foot parade, with carbines and 
side arms, and at twelve o'clock, the officers, non-commissioned officers and 
several of the private members proceeded to the Park for the purpose of 
playing a game of cricket with the Earl of Leicester. At four o'clock the 
officers and players sat down to a most sumptuous entertainment given by the 
noble Earl, at which every delicacy of the season was provided. 



*. 



>> 




The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1847. 301 



^ Friday morning the 21st, being the day appointed for the inspection of the 
corps, all was alive in the town of Wells, horses, carriages, and every descrip- 
tion of vehicle that could be put in requisition, were on the move, at eleven 
o'clock towards the reviewing ground. At twelve o'clock, the troops preceded 
by their excellent band marched on to the ground and formed line. At half 
past twelve the Lord-Lieutenant accompanied by the inspecting officer, Colonel 
Smith KC.B. of the Royal Horse Guards Blue, arrived on the ground 
and were received with military honours. After passing down the 
line, the inspecting officer requested Major Loftus to march past in open 
column of squadrons ; the troops then filed past, trotted past, and formed into 
line on their original ground, where various evolutions were performed. 

" The prize sword was contested for and won by Private Dunthorne of the 
Rainham troop, and presented by Captain Duckworth, the donor, to him. At 
the conclusion. Colonel Smith requested Major Loftus to express to the 
officers, non-commissioned officers and privates, how much pleasure it would 
afford him to be able to report to the Horse Guards, the efficient state of the 
Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry. 

"After which the troops proceeded to the stables where every accom- 
modation had been made for the horses, and proper persons appointed to take 
charge of them. This done, the whole corps were marched to the cricket 
ground, where a splendid banquet was prepared under a tent that held more 
than 300. At four o'clock the whole sat down to a dinner, the noble Donor of 
the feast presiding, supported on his right hand by Lord Hastings, Colonel 
Smith, Mr Astley. Capt Marryatt R.N ; Capt Boyd ; Rev. Upjohn, Hill, Napier, 
etc, etc, and on his left by Major Loftus ; Capt. Bingham R.N. ; Colonel 
Fitzroy ; Mr Gay ; Lieut. Thomas R.N ; Capt. Buck worth ; Major Girling the 
adjutant ; Mr. Norris ; Lieutenants Wood and Young ; Cornets William Free- 
man and William Wood ; Mr John Banks the surgeon." 



Prince Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry: 1847. 

Major commanding Charles Loftus 9 April 1838 

Adjutant Thomas Andrews Girling 22 Oct 1844 

Surgeon John Banks i Nov 1833 

HOLT TROOP 

Captain Thomas Boyd 



Lieut * George Wood 

Cornet William Wood 

65 rank and file 



Formerly Quarter- Master to the corps. 



302 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1847-48. 



■INOHAM TROOP 



Captain Frank Manyat 

Lieut Bertram W. Currie 25 March 1845 

Comet Lord John Wodehouse 
40 rank and file. 



ft ft 19 



■AINHAM TKOOP 

Captain Theo. J. Russell Buckworth 25 March 1845 

Lieut Denn Young „ ,, ,• 

Comet William Freeman Oct 1843 

63 rank and file 

Total 12 officers 

168 rank and file 



1848. 
The Norfolk Chronicle^ April 15th, 1848, has the following paragraph: — 

"Prince Albert's Corps of Yeomanry. 

"The following letter has been sent to the Lord-Lieutenant, and it is 
highly honourable to the loyalty and patriotism of the Major Loftus, his 
officers, and men ; who if ever required to act in their countrys service will 
we are certain, carry out the spirit of Nelson's memorable signal, 'That 
England expects every man to do his duty/ 

" Headquarters, Morston, 
" Near Blak eney. 

** 9th April 1848. 
" My Lord, 

''as Major commandant of Prince Albert's corps of Norfolk 
Yeomanry cavalry, I have to request, that, as Lord Lieut of this county, 
(through whom I am instructed to communicate with Her Majesty's Secretary 
of State on all matters relative to the assembling of the corps in aid of 
the civil power or otherwise) that you be pleased to inform Sir George Grey, 
that I am ready with my brother officers, the non-commissioned officers 
and privates of the corps under my command, to take the duty at Norwich 
if necessary, in the event of the services of the regiment now quartered there 
being required elsewhere ; or to march to any part of England to assist, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1848. 303 

with every \oyd\ man, in maintaining peace and good order, and to defend 
to the last, the Crown and Person of our Sovereign against all who may 
attempt to subvert the institutions of the country. 
"I have the honour to be my Lord, 

"your obedient servant 
«C. LOFTUS 
^ Major commandant of Prince Albert's Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry. 

*To 

•* The Right Hon. the Earl of Leicester 

" Lord Lieutenant of the county of Norfolk." 



Again on June loth, 1848, we find mention, that, ** The Prince Albert's 
own corps of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry — marched into Fakenham on 
Saturday the 27th of May for immediate duty, under the command of 
Major Loftus. They mustered very strong, were mounted on excellent 
chargers and had a martial appearance, which must have been extremely 
gratifying to their commander. 

On Sunday, the corps attended divine service at Fakenham church ; and 
on Monday, and the following days, they assembled for exercise on Hempton 
Green ; on the first named day, the anniversary of the Restoration, every 
man, sported the oak leaf, to show their attachment to the constitutional 
monarchy of the country. On Thursday evening, the band master, Mr. Jonas 
Wright, gave a concert, under the distinguished patronage of the Earl of 
Leicester, the Countess of Leicester, Major Loftus, and the officers of the 
corps. It took place in a building in Bull street, which was elegantly 
fitted up for the occasion. The room was completely crowded with the 
first families of the town and neighbourhood. 

"On Friday, the corps were inspected by Lieut-Col. Smyth of the 
i6th Lancers. They went through their evolutions with the greatest precision ; 
and after witnessing them, and minutely inspecting men, horses, and accoutre- 
ments, the gallant colonel addressed the corps ; telling them that he was 
highly gratified with their soldier like appearance, and the precision with 
which they moved ; and it would afford him much pleasure in being able 
to make a most satisfactory report of them to the Horse Guards. After 
the inspection, Lt-Col. Smyth, who was accompanied by several officers of 
the regiment, partook of luncheon with the officers of the Yeomanry ; and 
on leaving Fakenham, they were loudly cheered by the corps, who were 
delighted to have an opportunity of showing their respect and admiration 
to the heroes of Sobraon and Aliwal. 

*'The corps broke up on Saturday, after having spent a very pleasant 



504 The Records of the Yeomumry CoMtby of Norfolk, 1848-49. 



week ; and returned to their feq>ective homes, giving before they separated 
three cheers for the Qoeen» and three cheers for the Major and officers ; we 
may add, that the corps was never more efficient; the men performed 
their duties well, and displayed the best feeling towards their commander 
and the other ofHcers.** 



Prince Albert's Own Corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry : 1848. 



Major commanding Charles Loftus 

Adjutant Thomas Andrews Girling 

Surgeon John Banks 



9 April 1838 

22 Oct 1844 

I Nov 1833 



Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

65 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Cornet 

40 rank and file 

Captain 

Lieut 

Comet 

63 rank and file 

Total 12 ofTicers 



HOLT TtOOP 

Thomas Boyd 
George Wood 
William Wood 

HINGHAIC TKOOP 

Frank Manyat 
Bertram W. Currie 
Lord John Wodehouse 

RAINHAM TROOP 



25 March 1845 



•• 



t» 



Theo. J. Russell Buck worth 25 March 1845 
Denn Young „ „ „ 

William Freeman Oct 1843 



168 rank and file 



1849. 
In the beginning of the year 1849, the following correspondence passed 
between the Earl of Leicester, Lord-Lieut of the County of Norfolk, and 
Major LoftuSy relative to the disbandment of the corps. 

Whitehall (no date) 
My Lord, 

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship's 
letter of the loth inst, suggesting that, in consequence of local circumstances, 
it is expedient to disband Prince Albert's own corps of Norfolk Yeomanry 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 849. 305 



cavalry, and having laid the same before the Queen, I am to inform your 
Lordship, that her Majesty has been graciously pleased to signify her pleasure 
that, in persuance of your recommendation, the services of Prince Albert's own 
corps of Norfolk Yeomanry cavalry should be discontinued. I request your 
Lordship will be pleased to communicate this decision to the commandant 
of the corps in question, and also acquaint him, that all arms and accoutre- 
ments, if furnished by government, are to be held at the disposal of the 
board of Ordnance. 

G. GREY 
To 

the Right Hon. the Earl of Leicester etc etc 

Holkham. April i8th 1849. 
Dear Major Loftus, 

Having after the fullest consideration recommended to the 
Government tht disbanding of Prince Albert's corps of Yeomanry cavalry, 
I have received from them the enclosed communication which (though in your 
absence I shall of course forward to Buckworth, as your representative) I would 
rather lose no time in also transmitting it to you, and I shall be very much 
obliged if you will do everything proper for carrying out the directions therein 
expressed. ^ 

I am yours very truly, 

LEICESTER. 
To Major Loftus. etc etc. 



Norfolk Chronicle, June i6th, 1849: — 

"Prince Albert's Own corps of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. 

" On Wednesday the 30th ult, the members of the Holt troop assembled 
at the Feathers Inn, in that place, for the purpose of delivering their arms, 
clothing, accoutrements, and appointments, in pursuance of the order lately 
issued by the Secretary of State, at the suggestion of the Lord-Lieutenant of 
the county, for disbanding this body. Captain Boyd invited them to partake 
of a parting glass, and after drinking the accustomed toasts, he proposed the 
health of their worthy commandant Major Charles Loftus, which was received 
with rapturous applause. The health of the Captain and other officers, was 
drunk with great enthusiasm, and a letter from the Lord-Lieutenant was read 
expressing his thanks for the services of the corps. Before the party separated, 
the non-commissioned officers and privates assembled and one and all tendered 
their thanks to their officers for the uniform kindness they had received from 

u 



306 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1849. 



them on all occasions. As Major Loftus absence on the continent prevented 
his being present on this occasion, they also stated their determination to invite 
him to a public dinner on his return to England ; and in the course of the 
evening, a subscription was entered into for that purpose." 



Thus ended the career of the Norfolk Yeomanry for this period, after a 
consecutive service of nineteen years. Many years were now to elapse before 
the county was i^ain to see them in their midst. 

During this phase of their existence, they had trained in the following 
places : — 



1 831 


Yarmoath. 


1832 


Holt 


1833 


Lynn. 


1834 


No place mentioned. 


1835 


» w n 


1836 


Elmham Hall. 


1837 


No place mentioned. 


1838 


Dereham. 


1839 


Holt 



1840 


Cromer. 


1 841 


Yarmouth. 


1842 


SwafFham. 


1843 


Fakenham. 


1844 


Holt. 


1845 


East Dereham. 


1846 


Cromer. 


1847 


Wells. 


1848 


Fakenham. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

i860 to 1867. 

Mounted Volunteers in Norwich^ i860 — Organization of the Mounted 
Rifle Corps by Mr. Hay Gumey — Parliamentary Inquiry into 
Condition of Yeonuinry in 1861 — Norfolk Light Horse Ball-^ 
Marriage of the Prince of Wales — Grand Review on Mousehold^ 
1863— Her Majesty's Birthday, 186$— Visit of Prince of Wales to 
Norwich^ liGS^-Testimanial to Mr. Hay Gurney — Norfolk Light 
Horse Disbanded^ 1867. 

1859. 
When in 1859 the threats of the Emperor of the French led men to 
think of the weakness of our national defences, and the popular Volunteer 
movement was set on foot, it was heartily taken up in Norwich, and by 
no man more heartily than by Mr. Francis Hay Gurney. The prospect 
of a partnership in the Bank of Gurney & Co. had prevented his 
entering the Army, as he had ardently wished when a youth, and now 
the opportunity was given him of following to some extent the bent of 
his early inclinations. Mr. Hay Gumey and his brother, Charles Gurney, 
obtained commissions in the Norwich Rifle Corps when first formed in 
1859, a corps which Lieut-Colonel John Brett, late Major 17th Lancers 
afterwards commanded. 



i86d 
The Norfolk Chronicle of November 17th, i860, has the following 
announcement : — 

"Proposed Mounted Volunteer Corps. 

'* A meeting of gentlemen residing in the city and neighbourhood of 
Norwich, was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Royal Hotel to consider 
the practicability of forming a Mounted Volunteer Corps in connection 
with the present r^ment of Norwich Volunteers. 

'* The meeting was well attended ; Lieut Colonel Brett, commandant 
of the Norwich Volunteers was called to the chair. The chairman 



3o8 The Records of the Yiamanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 860. 



observed that this was only a preliminary meeting, and it had been called 
in consequence of a desire expressed by several gentlemen for the 
formation of a corps of mounted volunteers. Many such corps had been 
formed in various parts of the country, and he need not say they would 
be of great service in connexion with the volunteer infantry. Only a day 
or two ago, a meeting was held in London under the presidency of Lord 
Truro, to get up a mounted corps in the metropolis. 

''Captain Hay Gumey had made enquiries as to the cost of arms 
and uniform, and would be able to give some information to the meeting 
on that subject 

''Captain Hay Gumey said that a great many riding gentlemen in 
the city and neighbourhood had at different times syggested to him the 
feasibilty of forming a mounted corps, and he replied there was nothing 
he would like so much, or would be more willing to interest himself in 
promoting, provided it did not banish him from his own regiment He 
consulted Colonel Brett on the subject, and he said it would certainly be 
an advantage to have a number of mounted volunteers added to the 
existing body. He (Captain Gumey) had procured the drill book for 
mounted volunteers, which was extremely simple and cost only 6JL and he 
found that the opinion of Government was that mounted volunteers should 
not be treated as cavalry, but as mounted infantry. Cavalry was of no 
use unless in large bodies, and highly trained horses and men, which was 
almost impossible in a corps of volunteers ; but it was considered that 
active and expert riflemen well mounted would be extremely serviceable, 
as they could move about more quickly from place to place. The 
meeting had therefore been called for the purpose of ascertaining whether 
a sufficient number of gentlemen would come forward and join the 
Norwich Volunteers as mounted riflemen. From some conversation he had 
had with his brother in law. Sir Thomas Troubridge, who was a practical 
soldier, and with Colonel Baker of the loth Hussars, he was inclined to 
think the most suitable weapon for the mounted volunteers, would be 
Westley Richards breech loading carbine, which was a very handy weapon, 
and was sighted up to iioo yards. The mounted volunteers he might 
mention, would not be expected to fire from their horses, but to dismount 
and skirmish, and fire like infantry volunteers. The cost of the breech 
loading carbine was ;f 8-8. if not less than twenty were bought at a time ; 
the uniform recommended by Colonel Brett was the same as that of the 
Norwich Volunteers, with pantaloons and Blucher boots. The tunic and 
pantaloons would cost £3-12. the pouch belt 12/- and sword belt 12/-. (a 
voice and the boots?). Well, he concluded that every man who had 
a horse, had a pair of boots, and if he had not, he ought to have. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 860. 30$ 



(laughter). The boots of course would be of uniform pattera A common 
hunting saddle, with wallets would be sufficient, but theyr might get 
cavalry saddles afterwards if they got richer. They would use the 
cavalry bridle, the most recent pattern of which was extremely useful and 
simple as it formed a head stall also. He estimated, that the outfit 
complete, the carbine, tunic, pouch belt, and sword belt, pantaloons, shako, 
forage cap and bridle, assuming that every man had a pair of boots, 
would cost about j^i5, if they added a cloak that would cost ;£^i-iO. or 
;£'2-io more. He believed from what the deputy-assistant-adjutant-general 
told him that the government would very likely supply them with sabres, 
so that he had not included the cost of that weapon in the estimate. He 
thought the best plan would be to form a small committee to receive the 
names of gentlemen who might wish to enrol themselves, and then if a 
sufficient number were obtained the corps could be formed, if not, of course 
the movement must drop. 

''Captain Giimey exhibited one of Westley Richards breech loading 
carbines, a very fine weapon apparently, and also a sketch of a mounted 
volunteer in the proposed uniform. The following committee was then 
appointed to receive names of any gentlemen disposed to join a mounted 
corps : Captain Hay Gurney ; the Hon. Harbord Harbord ; R. Seaman Esq ; 
F. Grimmer Esq ; R. Chamberlin Esq ; The meeting then adjourned after 
passing a vote of thanks to Colonel Brett for presiding." 

Again on December 22nd, i860, I find the following: — 

"Mounted volunteers. 

" The committee appointed to further the above object in Norwich and the 
neighbourhood, beg to request the attendance of all persons interested in the 
movement, to a meeting to be held in the Royal Hotel, on Saturday the 23rd 
at half past three. 

"Hon. Captain Harbord Harbord. 
" Captain Hay Gurney 
*' Robert Chamberlin 
•* Fred Grimmer." 

On December 23rd, i860: — "An adjourned meeting was held at the 
Royal Hotel last Saturday to hear from the committee appointed at their first 
meeting, the progress made in the enrolment of recruits in the new corps of 
mounted volunteers, proposed to be attached to the Norwich battalion of rifle 
volunteers. 

'' Lieutenant Colonel Brett presided, 



3io The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 860-61. 

_ - - — ■ ' ■ 

''Capt. Hay Gurney stated, that at present the committee had only 21 
names, but there were many gentlemen who had intimated their intention to 
join, but had not made up their minds yet, a process which seems to be a 
rather long one. He had good authority for believing, that half a troop con- 
sisting of 25 or 30 men would be sanctioned, and that if such a number was 
raised, two subaltern officers, would be allowed ; the minimum number was 25, 
and the question to be determined was whether the committee should make 
another effort to procure more names. 

"Colonel Brett observed, that though he should be most proud as 
commandant of the Norwich Rifle corps, of having this mounted corps as an 
adjunct to that battalion, it was not at all necessary that it should be 
permanently annexed to it He hoped on the contrary, that this mounted 
corps might be a nucleus round which a large cavalry corps might be formed, 
and then of course it would be perfectly tndependant of the Norwich 
battalion. 

''It was agreed, that the committee should announce that they were 
prepared to receive additional names, and that on making up the minimum 
number of 25, they should apply to the Lord-Lieutenant for his sanction for 
the formation of the corps. With regard to the uniform, though that will be a 
matter of future consideration, when the corps is formed, there appeared to be 
a feeling in favour of a smart and rich dress, such as is worn by the regular 
cavalry regiments, and distinctive to that of the Rifle volunteers. 

'* The height of the horse is proposed to be not less than 1 5 hands nor more 
than 16. 

'' Names of gentlemen desirous of joining will be received by Capt. Hay 
Gurney, the Hon. Harbord Harbord and Mr F. Ghrimmer, and ought to be sent 
in as soon as possible as the fate of the movement must depend upon a 
sufiicient number of recruits being obtained within an early period." 



1861. 
In 1861 Parliament directed a committee to inquire into the organiza- 
tion and establishment of the Yeomanry force at that time. A few extracts 
from this report may be interesting to the readers of this book. 

•' REPORT. 

"To the Right Honourable the Lord Herbert, Secretary of State for 
War. 

'' The committee appointed by your Lordship's letter, dated 26th February 



LiEUT.-CoLONKL F. HAY GURNEY, 

commandkd 

Norfolk Light Horse 

FROM 1862 TO 1867. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1861. 31 1 



1 86 1, *for the purpose of inquiring into the present organization of the 
Yeomanry, with a view to ascertain and report whether any reduction can be 
made in the annual cost of the force, and what measures should be taken to 
render it more fitted, under existing circumstances, for the performance of the 
services required of it;' and also by your letter, dated 7th March 1861, "to 
consider the comparative position and relation in which the mounted Volunteer 
corps recently formed will stand to the Yeomanry/' have agreed to the 
following report : — 

" I. No independent troop shall consist of less than 40, nor more than 100 
private men, including farriers. 

" 3. A squadron to consist of two troops. 

" 5. A regiment to consist of from six to ten troops. 

"12. An adjutant shall be allowed to every r^ment or corps, the 
establishment of which is not less than 300 men, including non-commissioned 
officers. 

" 14. One permanent or drill sergeant shall be allowed to each troop or 
squadron. 

" 15. One permanent trumpeter shall be allowed each corps or regiment 

" We find that the adjutants travelling and contingent expenses, as well as 
the constant pay of the permanent sergeants and trumpeters, have generally 
been defrayed out of the contingent allowance, and we consider the system of 
direct payment to be preferable. 

^ The clothing, owing to the short time the force is called out in each year, 
ought to last at least seven years ; but as members of the Yeomanry corps are 
frequently changing, we are of opinion that the alterations thereby necessitated 
are far better and more easily provided for under the present system of a 
money allowance than by a direct Government supply. 

" We consider that the arms, equipments, and uniforms most appropriate 
to the duties required of the Yeomanry are those used by light cavalry. 

" With regard to the borrowing and providing of horses, we gather from 
the evidence that the practice in this respect is in most cases satisfactory, the 
Yeoman appearing generally to provide his own horse or to ride one belonging 
to a relative or an ofl^r. 

" We have to state, however, that in some regiments there appears to be an 
impression that one-third of the horses may be borrowed, and the evidence also 
shows that it has happened that farm servants have been enrolled, and have 
come mounted on their masters horses. We recommend that these practices 
should be discontinued. 

"As regards the present system of training for six consecutive days 
(exclusive of marching days), as compared with fewer days permanent duty 
and a larger amount of troop drills the evidence we have taken shows that any 



J 



312 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, i860. 



diminution of the period of permanent duty would be detrimental to the 
efficiency of the force. 

" After a careful investigation of the expenses to which a Yeoman is liable 
on account of his horse as well as himself during the short period of six days 
that he is on permanent duty, we are satisfied that 7s a day is only sufficient to 
cover his necessary outlay. We have considered the comparative position and 
the relation in which the Mounted Volunteer Corps recently formed will stand 
to the Yeomanry. 

" We find that a Yeoman is at all times liable to be called out, in aid 
of the civil power, and further, to perform escort duty at the shortest 
notice. A mounted Volunteer is exempt from these services, and is not 
liable to be taken away from his home, even for a day. 

"A Yeoman, on the other band, is not only liable to hold himself 
and horse in constant readiness for service throughout the entire year, but 
in addition to attending drill in his own vicinity (as the Mounted 
Volunteer does), he is bound to leave his home and avocation for eight 
consecutive days in every year, for the purpose of being instructed in 
regimental movements, when, as already stated, he receives only sufficient 
pay to cover his necessary outlay. 

'* According to an estimate which we have made, we find that by the 
adoption of our recommendations there will be an annual saving to the 
public, to the extent of about jf 13,000. We have been informed that great 
difficulties at present exist in enforcing by process of law the various 
rules and orders for the government of Yeomanry corps ; we therefore 
recommend that the Secretary of State for War should cause one uniform 
code of rules to be framed for the government of all Yeomanry in the 
kingdom. This would also be a favourable opportunity for reviewing the 
provisions at present existing for the recovery of arms, clothing, 
accoutrements, &c, from members of Yeomanry corps who have died or 
left the service, and for enforcing payment of fines legally due, and of 
penalties for the loss or damage of arms, clothing, and accoutrements. 

'' We cannot conclude our Report, without adverting to the circumstance 
of the Yeomanry force having from year to year maintained its numbers. 
We are confident that the country may rely upon a continuance of the 
loyalty and zeal of the members of this force, to keep the ranks efiective 
with horses as well as men ; and we are satisfied that they will not only, 
as heretofore, prove equal to the duties required of them in times of 
disturbance, but also be found a valuable auxiliary to Her Majesty's 
regular forces for national defence.'' 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 86 1 . 313 



NOTICES. 

The following occur in the Norfolk Chronicle at this period, March 
2nd, 1 86 1 : — 

'* 1ST Norwich Mounted Volunteers. 

"Grentlemcn residing within 10 miles of Norwich are invited to join 
this corps. Outfits including horse furniture £\2. Mounted drill once a 
week, at half past four o'clock on Thursdays. Every information given by 

«F. HAY GURNEY, 

"Capt N.R.V." 



March 9th, 1861. 

" 1ST Norwich Mounted Volunteers. 

"At a meeting of the above corps at the Militia barracks on Feb. 
5th, to consider a suitable dress ; it was unanimously resolved to adopt 
the uniform made and produced by Thomas Binghami military tailor. The 
same has been submitted to and finally approved of by the Lord 
Lieutenant, the Right Hon. the Earl of Leicester/' 



March i6th, 1861. " The First Norfolk Mounted Rifle Volunteer corps 
were attached to the City of Norwich Rifle Volunteer corps for administrative 
purposes." 



On April 6th, 1861, the announcement was made: — 

" 1ST Norwich Mounted Rifle Corps. 

"Francis Hay Gurney Esq to be Lieutenant." 

Among other prominent citizens who served at this time in the ranks 
of this corps were : — 

Alexander Chamberlin, Esq. 
J. J. Winter, Esq. 

On the same date, the Norfolk Chronicle contains this notice : — 

•'Norwich Mounted Volunteer Corps. 

'' The mounted corps now muster nearly forty members, and it is 
expected that the full company of 50 will be completed by the end of 
the month, in which case. Lieutenant Hay Gurney (who has resigned his 
captaincy of the 3rd foot volunteers to command the new corps) will 
become captain, and a lieutenant and comet will be appointed. 



314 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1861-62. 



''The uniform consists of a scarlet tunic with blue facings, white 
cross belt, white breeches, and Napoleon boots, the head dress is a busby 
with blue bag ; the forage cap is blue trimmed with white. 

" A number of the troop have daily appeared in the city during the 
week, on their way to drill ; they are exceedingly well mounted and 
certainly present a very imposing appearance. The dress is decidedly gay 
and very conspicuous, just the reverse of that of the foot volunteers, 
whose quiet unobtrusive looking uniform will look still more modest 
(though we think not less effective) by the side of the Artillery blue and 
the mounted scarlet." 

The Norwich Mounted Volunteers took part in the great review of 
the whole of the volunteers of the county, on Sept 12, 1861, which was 
held at Holkham Park, by Major-General Sir Archdale Wilson, Bart., 
K.C.B. This was the first occasion on which the corps had been brigaded 
since their formation. The review was fixed for eleven o'clock, but in 
consequence of a breakdown in the railway arrangements, and the consequent 
detention of companies on their way to the rendezvous, the parade was not 
formed until 2.15 p.nL The troops numbered upwards of 1,700, and were 
divided into two brigades, commanded respectively by Lieut-Col. Custance 
and Major the Hoa F. Walpole, West Norfolk Militia. The railway 
company dbplayed the same incompetency in conveying the corps from 
Holkham as in taking them there, and the Norwich men did not reach 
the city until six o'clock on the morning of the 13th. 



1862. 

About the latter end of i86i or the beginning of 1862 the corps 
appears to have had its title changed from that of the Norwich Mounted 
Volunteers to the Norwich Light Horse, as I find mention that: — 

"The Norwich Light Horse commanded by Lieut Hay Gurney took 
part in the great Volunteer fete given at Crown Point, on Sept 12, 1862, 
by Mr. R. J. H. Harvey, the High Sheriff of Norfolk. The city and 
county corps in two* brigades, commanded respectively by Lieut-Col. 
Custance and Lieut-CoL Asttey, were reviewed by Major-General Sir 
Archdale Wilson, K.C.B. The Norwich Cadet Corps recently organized 
by Mr. Noverre, and the Grammar School Cadet Corps were also in 
attendance. After the review the troops were entertained at dinner, a 
balloon ascent was made by Mr. Sommons, and military and other sports 
followed." 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1862-63. 315 



The Norfolk Chronicle of January 31st, contains an account of the First 
Norfolk Light Horse Ball, as follows : — 

''There was a numerous assemblage of gay company in St. Andrew's 
Hall on Friday evening at the Ball of the ist Norfolk Light Horse, in aid 
of the funds of the trumpet band, under the patronage of the Hon. Lady 
Lambert, Lady Stracey, Mrs H. S. Patteson, Mrs Brett, Mrs Cator, Mrs 
C. Arkwright, Mrs Cockburn, Mrs Hay Gumey, Mrs Charles Gurney, 
Mrs R. Chamberlin, and Mrs Fred Grimmer. The following Gentlemen 
acted as Stewards ; The Mayor, the High Sheriff, Col. Brett, Major Slade 
(5th Lancers), Major Middleton, Capt. Smith (5th Lancers), Captains 
Foster, Field, Croker, Keith-Morgan (N.R.V.), Captain Gumey (N.LH.), 
Lieut. Stracey (N.A.M.), Lieut. Boileau, Cornet Grimmer, Hon. Assistant 
Surgeon Cooper, Hon. Vet. Surgeon Smith, Sergeants Coleman, Chamberlin, 
Gale, and Winter (N.LH.). 

'' The company numbered about 360 ; and some 200 spectators 
assembled in the great orchestra to witness the enlivening scene. The 
Hall was elegantly and appropriately decorated ; the most striking and 
effective ornaments being the Flags and Banners of various colours, and 
devices, which were judiciously hung at every available point Around 
the pillars, wreaths of Flowers, and Evergreens were entwined, and at the 
upper end in the centre of the dais, was an enormous looking glass which 
reflected the whole scene, and over this, across the end, blazed in large 
letters, formed of gas jets, the title of the corps in full length, throwing a 
mass of l^ht over the entire hall, which imparted to the scene immense 
effect The dais was carpeted and occupied by all the luxuries of a 
drawing-room, with card tables, etc., etc, in short every comfort was 
provided. The supper was liberal in the extreme, the wines in profusion, 
and the whole arrangements seemed to give universal satisfaction. Mr. 
Howlett's very effective band discoursed its best music, and to its inspiring 
tones the dancing was kept up till an early hour in the morning. Mi. 
Noverre was the master of the ceremonies, and we need not say the arduous 
duties of that somewhat difficult office were ably carried out" 



1863. 
The following account of the marriage of the Prince of Wales is taken 
from the Norfolk Chronicle of 14th March, 1863: — 

"The movements of the troops at Norwich being according to the 
prc^amme previously published, the rejoicings commenced at eight o'clock 



3 1 6 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 863. 



in the morning, with the firing of a royal salute from the Castle. This 
having been done, the streets very soon began to fill, large numbers of 
people continuing to arrive from various parts of the county while the 
citizens themselves were astir early. 

'^ The Battalion of the Norfolk Rifle Volunteers, under the command of 
Lieut-Col. Brett, assembled and paraded in the Upper Close, at nine 
o'clock. They were accompanied by their band. The two companies of 
the N.R.V. Cadets, who were also accompanied by their band of Fifes 
and Drum, mustered in front of the Grammar School, under the command 
of Mr. Noverre. The Fifth Royal Irish Lancers, marched from the Cavalry 
Barracks, and took position on Tombland at 9.30. They were commanded 
by Colonel Massey, an officer whose name will be long remembered from 
its association with the assault of the British troops on the Redan at 
Sebastopol. The splendid band of the regiment preceded the troops and 
played in their best style, during a considerable portion of the morning's 
proceedings. 

*'The 1st Norwich Light Horse, commanded by Capt Hay Gurney, 
marched with the Lancers from the Cavalry Barracks. The enrolled 
pensioners, under the staff* of the West Norfolk Militia, the latter under 
the command of Captain L'Estrange, assembled on Tombland at nine. As 
soon as the cavalry had reached Tombland, the other troops fell in and 
the entire body moved off* amid the cheers of the spectators, who by this 
time were numerous. The order of the marching was as following: — 

** The fifth Lancers, Corps of enrolled Pensioners, the Staff* of the 
West Norfolk Militia, the Norwich Battalion of Rifle Volunteers, Two 
companies of Volunteer Cadets, and the ist Norwich Light Horse. The 
route taken by the troops, was up Queen Street, along London Street, 
through Market Place, Rampant Horse Street, and St Stephen's Street to 
Major Middleton's Field on Ipswich Road, where the Review took place. 
Nearly the whole line of route was crowded with spectators, and the 
scene was very striking. 

"Every window was filled with lookers on, for the most part ladies, 
whose bright smiles and cheerful faces, betokened the delight they took 
in the spectacle. Those who were not fortunate enough to obtain seats in 
Windows, and their name was legion, took up the most eligible positions 
they could obtain upon the pathways, and great was the struggling, and 
pushing for the best places at such points as commanded a good view of 
the proceedings. 

''Arrived at Major Middleton's Field the troops passed into the large 
area, which had been set apart for their evolutions, and we may here state 
that the arrangements for securing ample scope for the military, and at 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1863. 317 



the same time enabling the spectators to witness their movements were 
carried out in an admirable manner. 

''The result of these precautions was that the troops were enabled to 
get through their movements without any hindrance on the part of the 
crowd, while the public had a better opportunity of seeing the evolutions, 
than if they had been crowded together with no definite limit to their 
position of the Field. The troops who had marched on to the ground, in 
admirable order, looked remarkably well as they stood in line. The fine 
soldierly bearing and handsome uniforms of the Lancers were the subject 
of much favourable comment. The mounted Volunteers, who mustered 
very strongly on this occasion were conspicuous in their scarlet coats and 
showy helmets, the Militia Staff had a very neat and soldier-like appearance, 
the Battalion of Rifle Volunteers were strong in numbers, and went through 
their portion of the programme with steadiness and precision. 

"The Cadets gave evidence of great attention to their drill, while the 
Pensioners as representatives of a former period of our military history, gave 
an air of completeness to the general muster. The troops wore Wedding 
Favours of a uniform pattera Shortly after the several troops and 
companies had formed in line, Col. Cockburn, accompanied by the Mayor, 
and Sheriflf of the City who wore the golden Badges of their Office, and 
followed by the staff of officers, rode upon the ground and took up position 
in front of the saluting flag. 

" The staff consisted of Capt. Douglas, Capt. L' Estrange, Capt. Bellairs, 
Capt. and Adjutant Cubitt, Lieut. St. Aubyn of the 5th Lancers, Lieut 
Chamberlin of the Rifle Brigade, Lieuts. Heaviside, Stracey, Parmeter, 
Matchett, and Ensign Cockburn. Col. Cockburn was received with a general 
salute, after which the gallant Colonel accompanied by the civic-dignitaries and 
Staff, rode along the line and inspected the troops. They then returned to 
the saluting point, and the troops marched past in open, and quarter distance 
column. The cavalry marched past in single file, and then by threes, they 
next trotted past in open column of troops and galloped past left in 
front. During the latter movement, the charger of one of the Norwich 
Light Horse, getting for the moment the better of its rider, made a bolt, 
the unfortunate Volunteer having to throw away his sword before he could 
resume the mastery of his steed. 

" The Lancers then took open order and went through the lance and 
sword exercise. The whole of the troops then formed into line and saluted. 
The bands playing the National Anthem, Loud and enthusiastic cheers for 
Queen and Prince, and Princess of Wales, brought the proceedings in the 
field to a termination. 

" The troops then left the ground in order by which they had arrived, 



J 



3i8 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1863. 



except that they were headed by Col. Cockbum and Staff Passing along 
the Ipswich Road, the Chapel Field Road, and St Giles Street, the troops 
entered the Market Place shortly after twelve. The Cavalry proceeding 
along London Street, to St. James Barracks, for the purpose of putting up 
their horses, preparatory to assembling at the dejeuner provided for ail who 
had taken part in the mornings proceedings. The remainder of the troops, 
marched across the Market Place, and formed in line before the Wellington 
Statue, but in front of a platform, that had been built around the Statue, 
for the accommodation of the members of the Choral Society, who had 
assembled under the Conductorship of Mr Hill for the purpose of taking 
part in the proceedings. Among those who occupied the Corporation 
platform, we noticed, in addition to the Mayor, Sheriff, Deputy Mayor, 
Col. Cockburn and Staff, Sir W. Foster, Bart, Sir S. Bignold. Knight, 
Mr. Chancellor Evans, W. Birkbeck, O. Springfield, E. Willett, S. S. 
Beare, W. J. Utten Browne, R. Chamberlin, J. H. Tillett, J. Sultzer, R. 
Seaman, T. Brightwell, H. Woodcock, J. Betts, F. Brown, H. Willett, and 
R. N. Bacon, Esqrs, Dr. Copeman, and Rev : R. Burrot^hs, the Rev : J. 
Compton, Etc, etc, 

''The Market Place was crowded in almost every part, the windows 
on either side densely thronged and even the roofs of the houses were 
resorted to by the most daring of the sight seers. The tower of St 
Peters was also crowded with spectators, who however could obtain only 
a bird's eye view of the proceedings. 

"The Troops fired a feu de Joie at 12.30. 

"The Dejeuner. 

"The Dejeuner to the Military took place in an extensive Marquee, 
formed of tents, belonging to the Norwich Horticultural Society erected 
in the Parade ground of the Militia Barracks. The Marquee was erected 
in the form of the letter T. The cross table in the centre of the upper 
end being occupied by the Mayor, who was supported on either hand by 
Col. Cockburn, Lieut-CoL Brett, Major Massey, Capt Hay Gurney, R. 
Howes, Esq, M.P. Sir W. Russell, M.P. The Hon : Wenman Coke, M.P. 
The Hon: F. Walpole, Col. Fitz Roy, Sir W. Foster, R. J. H. Harvey, 
Esq., Major Marsham, The Rev : C. Turner, and Rev : R. Burroughes, Etc, 
A number of Ladies also occupied the upper end of the Marquee. 

" After the Infantry had taken their places, some delay was occasioned 
by the non appearance of the Cavalry, who it will be remembered had 
some distance to go after leaving the Volunteers in the Market Place. 
In the meantime, rain and hail descended in torrents, and those who 
were already seated had an opportunity of contrasting their position with 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 863. 3 1 9 



that of the absentees, who had to pass through the worst part of the 
storm. An incident which afforded some amusement took place before the 
arrival of the Lancers. The mounted Volunteers had already taken their 
places when the cry, * Here they come/ arose at the lower end of the 
Marquee, this was followed by shouts of Laughter, the cause of which 
could not be guessed by the members at the upper tables, until they 
were made aware of it by the portly presence of a distinguished member 
of the Light Horse, who made his way among his laughing comrades 
brandishing aloft the occasion of their mirth, in the form of a somewhat 
extensive and gouty looking umbrella* Soon afterwards the Lancers 
entered the Marquee, and took their seats at the table set apart for 
them. Grace was then said by the Bev : C. Turner, and the guests fell 
to with appetites of no mean order, but the viands which were supplied by 
Mr. Smith of the Bell Hotel were sufficiently substantial to withstand a 
heavy onslaught, those who suffered most were the Plum Puddings on 
the tables at which the Cadets were seated, these disappeared with a truly 
marvellous rapidity, and Sir. W. Foster, noticing the dearth that had been 
created, with a good humour, that made him popular among the boys, set 
off on a foraging expedition and succeeding in bringing back, and serving 
out to the hungry youngsters as much of the coveted luxury as they could 
dispose of. There was a plentiful supply of .sherry, which came from 
Messrs Norgate & Son., 

^ The Mayor proposing several toasts including Capt : Hay Gurney : — 
** Capt : Hay Gurney, returned thanks for having had his health drunk 
in so flattering a manner, which compliment he considered, more for his 
Corps than himself individually. He was sure the Norwich Light Horse 
would never be the last in coming forward to shew their loyalty towards 
Her Majesty, The Prince of Wales, and the rest of the Royal Family; 
and he considered it the greatest honour to command what he considered 
to be the best mounted Corps in England. (Cheers,) If their comrades 
had more experience than they, he could say for his corps that they had 
tried their best, and he jocularly added he was sure nobody could say 
that they were not first, and foremost, and quickest to-day. 

''The Mayor made a short speech and the company dispersed." 



In 1863 the title of the corps was again changed to ist Norfolk 
Light Horse, as I find orders issued by Capt. Hay Gurney, under that title. 



The Norfolk News, of September ipth, 1863, gives the following account 
of a Grand Review of Rifle Volunteers on Mousehold by the invitation of 
the Mayor and Citizens of Norwich. 



320 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1863-64. 



(Long account of Volunteers, in which are mentioned ist Norfolk Light 
Horse, as follows): — 

'' The Yarmouth Artillery had the honour of being first on the ground, 
but they had not long taken up their position, before the rising notes of 
the band of the Norwich Battalion showed that the City Volunteers were 
fast approaching. The Regiment of the i8th Hussars next arrived, after them 
the 2nd County Battalion, the ist County Battalion and lastly the troop 
of Light Horse Volunteers. 

''The position taken up was: — 

"The 1 8th Hussars on the right Light Horse on the left The 
infantry in quarter distance column, Yarmouth Artillery second, on the 
right, Norwich Battalion second on the left, 1st County Battalion right 
centre, 2nd County Battalion left centre, The Yarmouth Battalion occupy 
a position in the middle. 

"The following are the returns of the Field Status of the different 
Battalions. 

"Norfolk Light Horse. Capt Hay Gurney, commanding. Lieutenants, i. 
Surgeons. 2. Sergt Major, i. Sergts. 3. Trumpeter i. Privates 26. Total 35. 

"The Light Horse Volunteers emulated their skill, but horses used 
to going across country, will not keep in line like those trained for military 
purpose only, and accordingly it is not the least to the discredit of those 
horsemen to say they did not do it anything like so well as the r^;ulars." 

1864. 
The same paper of May 14th, 1864, contains the following: — 

" 1ST Norfolk Light Horse. 

* Under command of Captain Hay Gurney were called out under the 
new arrangement of continuous drill, on Monday the 2nd inst The men 
have mustered in greater force than on any previous occasion and the 
Drill has been in all respects satisfactory. On Thursday evening the 
Officers gave a dinner to the members, at the Bell Hotel, and on Friday 
they were reviewed by Lieut. CoL Knox, of the i8th Hussars, at the Drill 
Ground, Eaton. At the conclusion of the movements the reviewing officer 
highly complimented the Volunteers in the manner in which they acquitted 
themselves, and remarked that some of the marchings past in threes and 
single file had not been surpassed by any Cavalry Regiment he had ever 
seen. The corps headed by the band of the i8th Hussars, with the 
members of that Regiment had been on the ground during the review, returned 
to the city, and were dismissed on Tombland after being complimented 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1864-65. 321 

by Capt Gumey. The corps will parade once a month till July next when 
another continuous drill of five days will take place." 



The Celebration of Her Majesty's Birthday is thus noticed in the Norfolk 
News : — 

** On Tuesday the citizens of Norwich celebrated Her Majesty's Birthday 
with great Loyalty and Enthusiasm. 

" According to an official Programme the Volunteers and military 
assembled on Tombland at ia30 formed into procession, the i8th Hussars with 
their band were placed at the head ; then came the Norv^ch Volunteer Rifle 
Battalion, the Volunteer Artillery Corps, the Volunteer Battalion, and the 
Cadet Corps, the rear being brought up by the Norfolk Light Horse, under 
command of Capt H. Gumey. There was a strong muster of all Volunteers 
and the accoutrements of the men were well put on. It has been said that the 
Volunteers can only be properly estimated when placed by the side of the 
r^ulars, and certainly if this assertion holds good our city corps cannot be 
said to have suffered by its association with the fine and well-disciplined 
regiment under the command of Col. Knox." 



1865. 
''On May 20th, 1865. '^^^ ^st Norfolk Light Horse completed its annual 
training on Friday last, after having gone through five consecutive days drill 
under the command of Captain F. Hay Gumey. At night a ball took place in 
the Assembly rooms at which 100 Ladies and Gentlemen were present 
Dancing was spiritedly kept up for several hours, and the whole entertain- 
ment passed off successfully. Mr. Smith of the Bell Hotel provided the 
refreshment" 



On May 37th, 1865. ^ Her Majesty's Birthday was celebrated in Norwich 
with Loyalty and Enthusiasm. Pursuant to regimental commands the Rifle 
Volunteers mustered in the Close at 9.45. and thence preceded by the Artillery 
corps, marched to Chapel Field where the i6th Lancers and the ist Norfolk 
Light Horse Volunteers joined them. After going through some preliminary 
movements, the several corps were formed into line facing the city walls, to 
receive CoL Cockbum, (the reviewing officer), who arrived on the ground at 
eleven o'clock, accompanied by the Mayor, Staff etc The line stretched from 
end to end of the Field, and taking it in order from the right consisted of the 
volunteers commanded by Col. Black, the Artillery by Capt Brown and the 



32a The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1865-66. 



Light Horse by Captain Hay Guraey, and the i6th Lancers by Captain 
Liddell. The Reviewing Officer and his Staff were received with a general 
salute and they rode down and inspected the ranks, afterwards returning to 
the saluting post, in order to witness the marching past of the corps. The 
Lancers came first marching as steady and soldierly, as any one capable of 
judging could desire to see, then came the Light Horse who presented a very 
creditable appearance next the artillery, whose marching was good and lastly 
the rifle Volunteers, who kept together with an exactness that was surprising, 
considering the little training which a great number of them have had, the 
marching past by the double however was not so good, but in marching past 
by sulvdivisions round the centre the volunteers won approbation. 

^ After the feu de jaie the officers of corps, Magistrates, and Corporation 
proceeded to the Sword room, Guildhall, to drink Her Majesty's Health, for 
this purpose an abundance of Champagne and other wines were provided. 
The Mayor who occupied the chair, supported on the right and left by 
CoL Cockbum, CoL Black, Captain Riddell, Captam Hay Gumey, Captain 
Brown, Captain Toke, Captain Wames, Captain Parmeter, Major Patteson, 
Adjutant Micklethwaite, Captain UEstrange and the several officers who had 
taken part in the military proceedings, as well as the Magistrates and the 
Corporation. The Mayor proposed the Queen, Prince, and Princess of Wales 
and the rest of the Royal Family. 

** Other toasts were proposed, including Captain Hay Gumey. 

** Captain Hay Gumey returned thanks on behalf of the Light Horse." 



1866. 
The Norfolk Chronicle of November 3rd, 1866, states : — 

''Their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales with Her 
Majesty the Queen of Denmark and Suite left Sandringham to visit this City, 
and Lord and Lady Stafford at Cossey. They were accompanied by H.R.H. 
Duke of Edinburgh, who had accepted the invitation of the High Sheriff 
(W. A Tyssen-Amhnrst Esq.) to spend the Festival Week in Norwich." 

Here follows very long detail of entry to Cossey. The Light Horse 
Volunteers were entertained at breakfast in the refreshment shed, Cossey. 

'' At an early hour of the moming the bells of several churches rang forth 
a joyous welcome. The people soon began to take their positions on the 
pathway side of the barriers and the stands which had been erected everywhere 
were speedily occupied, while others soon after breakfast either to escape the 
crushing and jostling incidental to crowds, or to have a * better view of the 
Prince and Princess of Wales ' betook themselves to the outskirts of the Cityi 
so that at ten o'clock St. Giles Road and St Benedicts Road, nearly as far as 
the City boundary were lined with people. Between 10 and 1 1 o'clock the 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ i866»67. 323 



Mayor (W. P. Nichols Esq.) The Sheriff (W. J. Cubitt Esq.) The Deputy 
Mayor (C. E. Tuck Esq.) the Recorder (O. F. O'Malley Esq.) The Town 
Clerk (W. L. Mendham Esq.) The Clerk of the Peace (A. Dalrymple Esq.) 
The Deputy Clerk of the Peace (Mr. Cooper) and the City Treasurer (Mr. 
Simpson) proceeded to the City boundary to receive the Royal Party. The 
Mayor for the day had a very handsome carriage and four belonging to R. J. 
H. Harvey Esq., M.P. and was attired in ancient Mayor's Robe of Corded 
Scarlet Silk gown, with a peach coloured Mantle of the same material. The 
Recorder was habited in his official attire, as were the Clerk of the Peace, the 
Town Clerk, and the City Treasurer. The deputation alighted from their 
carriages, which were drawn aside until about twenty minutes past eleven, when 
the Royal carriages escorted by a detachment of the Norwich Light Horse 
appeared in sight. The autumnal tints of the trees, the bright uniforms of 
the Volunteers, the genial sunshine, and the Hill and dale of the road, these 
with the long train of carriages contributed to form a delightful picture." 



1867. 

The Norfolk Light Horse Volunteers, commanded by Captain F. Hay 
Gurney were disbanded in November, 1867. 

The officers forming the Norwich Light Horse Volunteers, when their 
existence as a corps closed, were as follpws : — 

Captain — Francis Hay Gurney 13 Oct, 1862 

Lieut. — Francis George M. Boileau 13 Oct, 1862 

Comet — Frederick Grimmer 11 May, 1862 

Surgeon — Emmanuel Cooper i July, 1862 

Vet Surgeon — William Smith i July, 1862 

"In November, 1867, a very handsome testimonial was presented to 
F. Hay Gurney Esq., late Captain of the ist Norfolk Light Horse Vdlunteers 
Corps. 

'' The present was a very beautiful work of the silversmith's art, consisting 
of the Models of two Light Horsemen, in Frosted Silver, the Commandant 
and Trumpeter each mounted on a splendid horse and in full dress uniform 
of the corps. The arms and crests of Mr. Gurney were engraved on the 
ground work, and the model stood on a beautiful ebony pedestal bearing 
the following inscription :-— 

" Presented to Captain Francis Hay Gurney, by the officers, non-com- 
missioned officers and privates of the ist Norfolk Light Horse Volunteer 
Corps as a token of the respect and esteem in which he was held by all the 
members of the corps raised and commanded by him between the years 
1861.7." 



324 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1867. 



In consequence of this disbandment, Norfolk was for many years without 
any corps. bearing the name of the county. However, Captain Hay Gumey 
was not to be done out of his soldiering inclinations, to which he was so 
well fitted, and those qualified to judge have often asserted that had he 
been permitted to choose a military career he would certainly have dis- 
tinguished himself. It is therefore natural to find him and his brother Charles 
accepting commissions as Lieutenants in November, 1868, in the nearest 
mounted corps to the county of Norfolk, namely the West Suffolk Yeomanry 
Cavalry. 

In this corps, Captain Hay Gumey served until the year 1886 when he 
retired from, as they were styled then, the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, as Major 
and Honorary Lieut-Colonel. 

From the year 1867 to 1901, the county of Norfolk ceased to maintain 
any mounted corps of any sort bearing its name ; but they contributed a 
few officers and men to the West Suffolk Yeomanry, or as they were styled 
in 1883, the Loyal Suffolk Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry. 



CHAPTER IX. 

1874 to 1899. 

Loyal Suffolk Hussars — Norfolk finds Officers for this Corps from 1 877 to 
I goo — Parliamentary Return on Yeomanry, 1875 — Parliamentary 
Return on Yeomanry, 1892 — Suffolk Yeomanry train at Yarmouth 
1896 — Suffolk Yeomanry train at Norwich, 1899. 

From the year 1893, the History of the Norfolk Yeomanry becomes merged 
in that of the Local Suffolk Hussars, so I must perforce give a short resum6 
of the history of that distinguished corps. 

The Suffolk Yeomanry date their formation to the momentous year 1793, 
when the enthusiasm of the gentry and yeomanry of the county led to the 
raising of corps of Volunteers, both horse and foot. Public meetings were 
held, and a considerable sum of money was subscribed, and in the year 
1893 the Loyal Suffolk Regiment celebrated with enthusiasm the centenary 
of its origin. There is some obscurity about the early history of the corps, 
but it is believed that the first troop was raised at Bury St. Edmund's 
though regimentally the Eye troop had the number one. The services 
of four troops were accepted in 1794, and of two more in the following 
year, and in 1798 troops were added at Ipswich, Botesdale, Ickworth 
and Fomham. At meetings of the different troops in 1796 the officers were 
requested over and over again to assure His Majesty "of their readiness, 
in case of invasion, to march on the shortest notice to any part of the kingdom, 
and to be employed on every occasion on which they could render essential 
service to their King and country." No such opportunity offered itself, but 
the Suffolk Yeomanry have more than once been called out in aid of the 
civil power, and have maintained their efficiency. At the time great 
enthusiasm prevailed in East Anglia, where it seems to have been supposed 
a landing might be effected, for the Romney Light Dragoons were quartered 
at Bury, and the Warwickshire Fencible Light Infantry at Ipswich. The 
history of the individual troops of the Suffolk Yeomanry seems to be im- 
perfectly known, but the regiment remained in existence through the great 
war and were not "released from their engagements'' until the reduction 



» 

326 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1874. 



of 1827, when they were thanked in most unqualified terms of praise for 
the *' willingness, the activity, the ardour, and the judgment which had been 
found to prevail in every part of this respectable corps." 

In 1 83 1 we find the Bury St Edmund's Troop of Horse, or the ist Loyal 
Suffolk Yeomanry Cavalry, in existence, under the command of Mr. Philip 
Bennet, of Rougham Hall, who long represented West Suffolk in Parliament 
There was no lack of enthusiasm, for troops were raised also at Melford, 
Eye, and Saxmundham, though the last two were soon disbanded. Each 
of the senior troops numbered about fifty men, with a trumpeter, but no band, 
though one was added when the two troops were disbanded. The uniform 
at the time is described as having consisted of rifle-green coatee with brass 
epaulettes, a black patent-leather waistbelt, the trousers of " pepper and salt/' 
with red stripe, the dress headgear a heavy black-haired shako with broad 
top and black horsehair plume, with a brass plate in front inscribed with 
the words *' The Loyal Suffolk Yeomanry." The mounts were broad-backed 
Suffolk '' punches," an excellent class of horse. In the year i860 a change 
in the uniform was made, when a tunic and cloth helmet, with brass edgings 
and strap, were introduced, a plume being afterwards added. The busby 
was worn a little later, and from 1868 to 1872 the headgear consisted of a 
heavy brass helmet with white horsehair plume. The tunic became a little 
more elaborate in its facings and trimmings, and since 1872 the Hussar 
uniform of dark blue tunic with yellow braid, and busby with cockade has 
been worn. 

The Bury St Edmund's troop was amalgamated in 1869 with the 
Melford troops, for a second had been formed there, an^ the Loyal Suffolk 
Yeomanry were trained in that year at Sudbury. In 1872 the strength of 
the regiment all told was 145, the average number on parade being 133. 
The commanding officer at the time was Colonel J. T. Ord, with Majors 
Lord Rendlesham and Bennet A few years later the Melford troops were 
disbanded, but some of the men who had constituted it joined a troop 
formed at Lowestoft, while others entered a troop in Essex. Other troops 
were formed in Suffolk and had their headquarters at Bury, Stowmarket, 
Ipswich, and Lowestoft, but the Stowmarket and Ipswich troops were after- 
wards merged together. Many changes have passed over the Loyal Suffolk 
Yeomanry since the formation of the troop in 1793, and the r^ment 
successively assumed the character of light cavalry, lancers, dragoons and 
hussars. At this time the corps was recruited from Suffolk, Essex, and a 
part of Norfolk, and the headquarters of its troops were at Bury, Chelmsford, 
Ipswich, and Lowestoft. Owing very largely to the exertions of Colonel 
Lucas, the centenary of the regiment was celebrated at the time of the 
training and permanent [duty in 1893 by a military tournament and a 



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The Records of the Yeomanry Ca/vcUty of Norfolk, 1874-75. 327 



complimentary ball, and the regiment was honoured by a visit from its 
Honorary Colonel, H.R.H. the Duke of York. — Army and Navy Gazeitet 
2nd April, 1898. 

In the annual Inspection Report of Yeomanry Cavalry in Great Britain 
for 1874, I find the State of the Suffolk Yeomanry as follows : — 

" Present at Inspection — 12 officers, 17 NCOs, 76 privates, total 105. 

''Absent from Inspection — 2 officers with leave, 2 NCOs with leave 
26 privates with leave, 29 privates without leave, total 591 

"Establishment — 13 officers, 20 NCOs, 173 privates. 

" Permanent Staff Establishment — i sergeant-major, 4 sergeants, 
I trumpeter." 



A Committee, appointed by the Secretary of State for War, on the 6th 
April, 1875, to consider various questions that had arisen with respect to the 
Yeomanry Cavalry, sent in a report from which I give certain esctracts. 

They report : — " It has been represented by many witnesses that through 
the agency of the Yeomanry a class of persons is made available for the 
defence of the country, who would not enter any other branch of Her Majesty's 
Service. 

'' We are also satisfied from the evidence we have received, that the present 
mode of mounting the Permanent Sergeants is unsatisfactory, and we 
recommend that horses should be provided for them by the Government during 
the period of the permanent duty and the mounted troop drills. 

'< The evidence which we have taken, convinces us that the military duties 
of the Sergeants of the Permanent Staff cannot in ordinary cases occupy all 
their time. A position of enforced idleness seems in all respects objectionable, 
and we think that they should be allowed to accept civil employment, subject 
to the consent of their Commanding Officer, and with the sanction of the 
Secretary of State, upon the distinct understanding that it does not in any way 
interfere with their military duties. 

"We have considered the position and duties of Trumpeters on the 
Permanent Staff, and from the evidence that their services are only required in 
that capacity during the period of permanent duty. We cannot, therefore, 
recommend the continuance of such a permanent appointment. 

" We do not consider that any advantage has accrued to the Public Service 
from the employment of the Permanent Staff of the Yeomanry as recruiters for 
the Regular Service, and it has been stated, apparently with good reason, that 
the relations of the Non-commissioned Officers with the Yeomen are impaired 
by the performance of such duties. 



328 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1875. 

''We recommend that the oif[ani2ation should continue to be by 
Regiments, and that the training of the Yeomanry should be mainly directed to 
the duties of Light Cavalry* We think that the equipment of Yeomanry 
should be that of Light Cavalry; that every man should be armed with a 
breech-loading rifle, carrying a cartridge containing its own ignition, and 
should be required to go through the course of Musketry prescribed for the 
Cavalry, when ranges are available. We do not recommend any immediate 
interference with the present uniform, but consider that gold lace, which is the 
distinctive mark of the Regular Forces, should be gradually discontinued in 
those Yeomanry Regiments where it is still worn, and that the change should 
be completed in each Regiment by the 3rear 1885. The evidence is almost 
entirely in favour of the use of saddlery of the Government pattern, and we 
recommend that it should be universally adopted, and obtained from the 
Government Stores on the usual terma 

" We are unanimous in our opinion that no Regiment can be efficient with- 
out an Adjutant Great stress was laid on this point by the Inspectors of 
Auxiliary Cavalry, and by nearly all the witnesses, and as we are not prepared 
to propose any relaxation with respect to the minimum strength which now 
qualifies a Regiment to have an Adjutant, we recommend that 200 Non- 
commissioned Officers and men shall be the minimum establishment of a 
Yeomanry Regiment, and that as a general rule, 50 shall be the minimum 
strength of a troop. We have considered the question of introducing an 
oi^anization by squadrons, instead of by troops, but find that nearly all the 
evidence is adverse to its adoption, nor is it dear that it would be productive 
of any saving to the public 

''On the whole, we think that the functions of Yeomanry should be 
exclusively directed to the proper duties of Light Cavalry and we find ourselves 
compelled to recommend the discontinuance of the Artillery and unmounted 
Troops, as not forming part of the establishment of a Cavalry R^ment in 
modern times. 

'* We are of opinion that all officers who join the Yeomanry hereafter, 
below the rank of Field Officer, should be required to obtain certificates from a 
School of Instruction. At present the Regulations prohibit the issue of pay 
during Permanent Duty to any Yeoman who has not previously attended nine 
drills, three of which must be mounted troop drills. The general evidence 
tends to prove that although these drills have been well attended in some 
regiments, yet in others the attendance has been so bad that littie real benefit 
can be derived from them, and complaint is made by the Yeomen themselves 
that they are put to expense and loss of time by coming to these drills, for 
which no payment is allowed. No regular time or duration is prescribed for 
them. In some troops two drills have been reckoned on the same day; in 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1875. 329 



others a short troop drill is reckoned on the day when the regiment is 
assembled at Headquarters. These practices we think are irregular. 

*' At present, during an ordinary eight days training, one day is occupied 
in assembly at Head-quarters, one day is Sunday, one day is taken up by 
Inspection, one is occupied in returning to Troop Headquarters and dismissal. 
It appears from the above detail that only four days are available for drill. 
The evidence on the subject of horses varies, as might be expected, very con- 
siderably in different localities. In some Regiments the number of hired horses 
is exceedingly large, while in others the men, with few exceptions, ride their 
own horses or those borrowed from relatives. It may at first sight appear harsh 
to forbid the hiring of horses, and it has been urged that the State gains by the 
security that a given number of horses are thus kept available for the Public 
Service. We are, however, of opinion that no dependence can be placed, in 
time of national emergency, upon men so mounted, inasmuch as the demand 
for horses at such a time would render it doubtful whether the Yeoman could 
then obtain the horse which he now hires. We therefore consider that a 
Yeoman's horse should either be his own or one borrowed from some relative 
friend, or employer who shall engage, to the satisfaction of the Officer 
Commanding the Troop, that the horse shall be forthcoming whenever 
required. 

*' We consider that there is a great advantage in having the inspections of 
the Yeomanry conducted year after year by Officers employed solely upon this 
duty, as they are able to check the recurrence of practices which they consider 
objectionable, and can also watch and record the improvement or the falling off 
of the several Corps in their districts. We cannot but recognize the improve- 
ment which has taken place in the Yeomanry under this system, and are 
desirous of expressing our sense of the tact and ability with which the 
Inspectors of Auxiliary Cavalry, Colonel Oakes and Colonel Seager, have 
performed their difficult duties ; and we also wish to place on record our 
opinion of the zeal and attention on the part of Commanding and other Officers 
of Yeomanry, by which many Regiments have been brought to their present 
degree of efficiency." 

A Committee was appointed by the Secretary of State for War to 
consider the condition of the Yeomanry, in May, 1892, and further to consider 
the position of the Yeomanry with a view of making recommendations as to 
the amalgamation of Corps and other desirable reforms. 

The reason why this was necessary, was, because the Yeomanry force had 
been in a declining state for some years. For instance, the Suffolk Yeomanry, 
by the statement in this Report, shows the number of efficients (exclusive of 
Permanent Staf!) for whom the Contingent Grant was issued during the years 
1889, 1890, 1891, to be only an average of 129 efficients. 



330 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1875. 



The Committee state: — ^"We have taken evidence and find, that the 
Yeomanry is at present oi^anized in 39 different regiments, with an establish* 
ment of 13,067 Yeomen. The total enrolled strength last year was 91869 ; the 
efficient strength was 8,47 1 men. The average efficient strength per regiment 
was, therefore, about 217 men ; it varies greatly, however, for diffierent regiments 
The two strongest regiments last year were the Gloucestershire and the 
Leicestershire, each with an efficient strength of 356 ; the weakest the Lothians 
and Berwickshire with 116. Twenty-four regiments out of the thirty-nine 
were under 250 efficients, of which sixteen were under 200, and dght under 
150 efficients. 

^ The Yeomanry regiments are at present organized in troops, the number 
of which varies from four to eight for different regiments. Each troop has a 
non-commissioned officer from the regular army as permanent staff'-sergeant, 
and each regiment is given a Cavalry Officer as Adjutant. It cannot be said 
that this organization is satisfactory, either from a peace or a war point of 
view. From a peace point of view, the amount of permanent staff* allowed 
appears in excess of what should suffice for the military training of the various 
regiments. From a war point of view the size, both of the troops and of the 
regiments themselves, is too small. The Hants, with 133 efficients, has six 
permanent staff'-sergeants, or one to every 22 men. With this instance before 
us (and others might be given), it is impossible not to feel that the training 
power allotted to the Yeomanry from the Regular Cavalry is in excess of what 
is required This is not only a source of unnecessary expense, but it causes a 
heavy drain on the regular Cavalry. 

"On the other hand, from the point of view of service for the home 
defence — the main object for which the Yeomanry exists, and to which, it is 
needless to say, its constitution should be specially adapted — ^this organization 
is even more defective. A corps not much stronger than a regular squadron at 
war establishment could not, on mobilization, be treated as a Cavalry regimenti 
or worked as such, and a troop of from 20 to 30 men is too small to form a 
satisfactory tactical unit The first thing that would have to be done, were the 
Yeomanry called out for the defence of the country, would be to group 
together every two or three of the present weak troops into some laiiger tactical 
unit — and to unite the regiments themselves into brigades of some kind, whose 
strength should approach that of a Cavalry raiment The evidence which has 
been taken by the Committee tends to show that, although there may be 
special difficulties in the cases of particular regiments, there is no serious 
obstacle to the introduction into the Yeomanry of the squadron system, which 
has just been adopted for the r^ular Cavalry. 

*' Under present conditions it cannot be said that any incentive is given by 
the War Office to shooting in the Yeomanry, or any real endeavour is nuide to 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1875. 33 1 



train Yeomen properly in the use of the carbine. The regulations lay down 
that they shall go through a certain musketry course annually. No advantage, 
however, is attendant on performing this course; no penalty attaches to its 
non-performance. Described simply, it consists of a few aiming drills and in 
firing 40 rounds at a target, but neither the regiment nor the man himself is 
affected by the score made in those 40 rounds. If not one of them touches the 
target, no one is in any degree the worse. No travelling allowance is given, 
and any expenses for going to and from the range fall on the Yeomanry. Such 
interest as is taken in shooting by Yeomen, is due entirely to their public spirit 
and to the encouragement given by their Officers. 

'* Commanding Officers and others, indeed all connected with the 
Yeomanry, are practically unanimous in representing that Officers are pqt 
to expense by serving in the Yeomanry, and that the present contingent 
allowance is insufficient for the expenses it is intended to cover. We are 
satisfied that these representations are well founded, and that the allowance 
is below what — even under existing conditions — is necessary to meet the 
cost of clothing, appointments, orderly room expenses, and other minor items 
for which it is intended. In conclusion, we would observe that in making 
our recommendations our object has been to increase the efficiency of the 
Yeomanry, with the least possible disturbance of its existing organization. 
Moreover, we have had throughout in view the rendering of the force a 
valuable defence against an invader, rather than its functions as a support 
of the civil power. The latter role is one which the increase of railway 
communication, and the facility and rapidity with which r^ular troops can 
be transported to any given place, render it every day less likely to be 
called on to perform. The former is its main raison iTelre. There is a 
praiseworthy feeling among the Yeomanry that the force should be of 
recc^nized utility ; and one of its chief grievances is that the force has 
been given no place in the scheme of Home Mobilization. It is not 
unreasonable, therefore, to expect that all ranks will loyally co-operate in 
accepting changes the only object of which is to fit the Yeomanry to hold 
the position it covets. 

''There is, we are satisfied, plenty of patriotic sentiment and of good 
soldierly material in the Yeomanry, both as regards officers and men, and 
if the process of evolution in our military system has left the force some- 
what behindhand, it has been its misfortune rather than its fault." 



332 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1875-99. 

These recommendations were duly carried out» and the Suffolk 
Yeomanry were brigaded with the Herts, and one r^[ular Adjutant was 
appointed to the two regiments. Soon after this date also, the squadron 
system was adopted, and one sergeant from a regular Cavalry Regiment 
was appointed to each squadron instead of as before to each troop. 



1893. 
Up to the year 1893, Norfolk supplied a small contingent of men for 

the Suffolk Yeomanry, and in this year, Lieut *Colonel A. G. Lucas, of 

Lowestoft, having assumed command of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, the 

flow of officers and men from Norfolk certainly increased. From this year, 

the county of Norfolk always found a troop for their adjacent county 

regiment A troop sergeant-major was appointed to reside at Norwich to 

look after the interests of the Norfolk men, and they alwasrs had a Captain 

and Lieutenant resident in the county. In 1894 the following officers 

resident in the county of Norfolk were appointed to commissions in the 

Loyal Suffolk Hussars : — 

Sir G. R. L. Hare, Bart., Captain. 
* Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, Lieut. 
Hon. H. J. Astley, Lieut. 

In 1898, G. C. Buxton was gazetted a and Lieutenant. 
In the year 1899, J. R. Harvey, late 5th Lancers, was gazetted a 

Captain. 
In 1900, we find A. R. Buxton gazetted a 2nd Ueutenant. 



1896. 
May 2 1st — The annual training of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars 
(Yeomanry Cavalry), commanded by Lieut.-Col. A. G. Lucas, commenced 
at Yarmouth. 

1899. 
May 17th. — The Loyal Suffolk Hussars assembled at Norwich for the 

annual training, which concluded on the 25th. Lieut-Col. A. G. Lucas 

was in command of the regiment They were inspected by CoL 

Babington, of the i6th Lancers, on Mousehold. 



CoLONBL A. G. LUCAS, C.B., M.V.O., 

COMMANDED 

Duke or York's Own Loyal Suffolk Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry 
FRou 1891 TO 1900. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1899. 333 



Duke of York's Own Loyal Suffolk Hussars, 

Yeomanry Cavalry: 1899. 

Hon. Colonel: 
H.R.H. George F. E. A. Duke of York, K.G., KT., K.P., G.C.V.O. 

LlEUT.-COLONEL : 

'^'A. G. Lucas (Commanding) 

F. H. G. Cruickshank 

Majors : 

R. B. Colvin 

E. W. D. Baird 
H. P. Levite 

Captains : 

W. R. Greene 

Hon. D. A. Tollemache 
•Prince F. V. Duleep Singh 
•J. R, Harvey 

Sir S. H. L. Stuart, Bart. 

Lieutenants: 

*R. O. Kerrison 
•F. W. Jarvis 

H. E. Crawley 
•G. C Buxton 

Hon. W. E. Guinness 
•A. R. Buxton 

G. S. Whitfield 
•W. G. Lucas 

Medical Officers: 

A. Cooper 

F. Treves 

Hon. Chaplain : 

Rev. L. D. Keiiyon*Stow 
Uniform, green ; facings and busby bag, scarlet ; plume white. 

* Those marked * were Norfolk men. 



CHAPTER X. 

1899 to 1901. 

The Raising of the ^yrd and 44M Squadrons of Imperial Yeomanry by the 
Suffolk Hussars at Norwich^ 1899 — Departure for South Africa^ 1900 
— The 4ird and 44th in South Africa — Arrival Home at Bury and 
Norwich^ 1901. 

1899. 
In the year 1899, the establishment of the Yeomanry Force for Great 
Britain stood at the figure of 11,891, the actual strength being 10433. These 
figures may be compared with those for the year 1887, when the establishment 
stood at 14405, and the strength at 11,576, and it maybe observed at the 
same time that the estimated population of the United Kingdom had risen 
from about 36,599,000 in 1887 to about 40,798,000 in 1899. Thus had the 
Yeomanry Force been declining in importance, and some corps were in a 
lamentable condition as regards numbers, some so-called raiments, with 
difficulty being able to muster at their annual trainings more than two 
squadrons of one hundred rank and file. For officers they were better off, the 
uniforms were showy and costly, and the duties required extremely light 
They were therefore composed largely of rich men, who had ample means and 
inclinations to follow a hobby in which they could do as little or as much as 
they liked. 

In October, 1899, the War Office was approached by Lord Chesham and 
other Yeomanry Officers on the subject of raising a force of Yeomanry for 
service in the war in South Africa. After the disastrous week which ended in 
the action at G^lenso, assent was given to these proposals. A corps was 
formed by virtue of a Royal Warrant, dated 24th December, 1899, styled the 
Imperial Yeomanry, and at the same time instructions were issued embodying 
the organization and terms of service. 

A Committee of distinguished Yeomanry Officers was constituted to 
administer the Force, and special departments were assigned to thent 

(i) Colonel A. G. Lucas, Loyal Suffolk Hussars; General Supervision. 

(2) Colonel E. W. Beckett, M.P., Yorkshire Hussars; Finance. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1899. 335 

(3) Colonel Viscount Valentia, Oxfordshire Hussars; Enrolment and 
Establishment. 

(5) Colonel the Earl of Lonsdale, Westmoreland and Cumberland 
Yeomanry ; Saddlery and Horse Equipment. 

(6) Captain the Hon. W. L. Bagot, Reserve of Officers; Clothing and 
Equipment. 

(7) Colonel the Right Hon. Lord Harris, Royal East Kent Yeomanry ; 
Transport and Shipping. 

The corps was organized in units of squadrons, and four squadrons were 
assigned to a battalion, but in many cases, the squadrons never served with 
the battalions to which they were assigned. The Imperial Yeomanry were 
recruited from the existing Yeomanry regiments. EUich Yeoman had to 
enlist ^ for one year or for the war/' had to be not less than twenty or more 
than thirty-five years of age ; and had, before being selected, to satisfy the 
officer commanding a Yeomanry regiment that he was a *'good rider and 
marksman." Imperial Yeomen were to receive pay, rations, and other allow- 
ances of their rank as Regular Cavalry soldiers. Of these about 10,000 
went out early in 1900, and are usually referred to as the First Contingent. 
They were supplied with arms by the War Office, were entirely clothed and 
equipped and provided with horses by the Central Committee before mentioned 
of officers commanding Yeomanry Regiments. The cost was met partly by a 
capitation grant of £21 per man for clothing, equipment, and saddlery allowed 
by Government, but partly also by County funds, and a central fund which 
received £66fiOO^ of which £iopoo were subscribed by a single South African 
firm. 

On December 20thy 1899, the War Office issued a statement regarding 
the Yeomanry, which contained among other conditions of service, the 
following : — 

(i) Her Majesty's Government have decided to raise for service in South 
Africa a mounted infantry force to be named the Imperial Yeomanry. 

(2) The force will be recruited from the Yeomanry and others who 
possess the requisite qudifications. 

(3) Applications for enrolment should be addressed to colonels command- 
ing Yeomanry regiments. 

A few days later the following appeal was sent to the Norfolk papers by 
Colonel A. G. Lucas. 

••Sir, 

** During the threatened French invasion at the end of the last 
century, the conception of raising a yeomanry force was ventilated by Mr. 



336 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1899- 1900. 

Young, a citizen of this ancient borough. The subsequent appeal for Volun- 
teers was met by a ready response, and in Suffolk alone over eight hundred 
men were enrolled in the Yeomanry, and lai^ corps were also raised in 
Norfolk and Essex. At the present time, when the whole country is respond- 
ing so nobly in the formation of an Imperial Yeomanry, I sincerely hope the 
men in the Eastern Counties will show the same patriotic spirit as they did a 
hundred years ago, and come forward and join the old East Anglian Regiment 
the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, the pioneer regiment of the Yeomanry force. 

^ All desiring to join should report themselves immediately at the head- 
quarters of the troops in their districts as follows: — ^Sergt-Major Ellery, II7» 
Queen's road. Bury St Edmund's ; Seigt-Major Earle, 2, Cheverley terrace, 
Railway road, Chelmsford ; and Sergt-Major Giles, 80, Collie road, Norwich 

"ALFRED G. LUCAS, 
"Colonel commanding D.Y.O. Loyal Suffolk Hussars. 
"^ Bury St Edmund'a December 28th, 1899" 

Colonel Lucas being employed on the Central Yeomanry Committee at 
the War Office, it was of course quite impossible for him to attend to the 
recruiting of his regiment at Norwich ; he, therefore, deputed Lieut-Colonel 
Cruickshank to carry on the necessary work with Captain J. R. Harvey as his 
adjutant 

On December 28th, the following notice appeared in the Norfolk 
papers: — 

** Duke of York's Own Loyal Suffolk Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry. 
" Regimental orders by Lieut-CoL F. H. G. Cruickshank. 
"All members of the above Regiment who have volunteered for active 
service in South Africa, and all civilians who are wishing to enrol themselves 
in the regiment with a view of proceeding on active service, will attend at the 
Maid's Head Hotel, Norwich, at lajo a.m., on Tuesday next, 2nd January, 
1900^ for the purpose of being medically inspected and otherwise examined as 
to their general fitness. 

"By order 

"J. R. HARVEY. 
"Captain and acting adjutant 
"Loyal Suffolk Hussars." 



190a 
The historic old Maid's Head now became a busy scene. The courtyard 
of this famous old hostelry became crowded with some two hundred young 
fellows all anxious to be accepted, for service in South Africa, and fine formers 



>l 
n 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 337 

and sporting townsmen they were — well-built, broad-chested, tall fellows and 
wiry young men. The following officers of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars were 
present to assist in the enrolment : — 

Lieut.-Col. F. H. G. Cruickshank 
Major R. B. Colvin 
Major K W. D. Baird 
Captain W. R. Greene, M.P. 

Hon. D. A. Tollemache 
Prince F.- V. Duleep Singh 
J. R. Harvey 
Lieut. R. O. Kerrison 
„ H. E. Crawley 
„ G. C. Buxton 
„ Hon. W. E. Guinness 
„ A. R. Buxton 

Whilst Surgeon Lieut.-Col. A. Cooper of the regiment performed the 
medical inspection, assisted by Surgeon-Major J. Stacy of the ist Volunteer 
Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment 

Several magistrates were in attendance to administer the oath of allegiance 
to the men, among the most prominent were Mr. Hustler Tuck, of Blofield, 
and Mr. R. H. Denny, of Framingham Pigot Whilst Mr. Fred Low the 
well-known veterinary surgeon of Norwich was ready to receive instructions 
regarding the examination of any horses that were to be purchased. 

All the day through, the old Maid's Head Hotel and its quaint courtyard was 
a scene of bustle and activity. The Loyal Suffolk Hussars, a smart regiment 
of Yeomanry, which owned H.R.H. the Duke of York as its honorary colonel, 
were mustering for real service in South Africa, and with them came a crowd 
of civilians anxious to be helping Britain against Britain's foes. Two spacious 
rooms up the staircase next the old-fashioned bar had been freely lent by Mr. 
Henry Clarke, the host of this well-known hotel, for the officers and for medical 
examination ; and up and down to them all day there streamed a tide of smart 
fellows who would have made a cavalry sergeant's eyes glisten could he have 
hooked them for his regiment The Loyal Suffolks were a crack corps, and the 
general public took a keen interest in the whole business, watching the entrance 
to the courtyard of the Maid's Head all day, scrutinising both troopers and 
candidates with evident respect, and gazing with something akin to awe on the 
stalwart troop seigeants, perpetually diving among the jovial-hearted muster 
as this man and that man went to '* see the doctor " and came back certificated 
" fit." 



338 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 

The members of the Yeomanry were soon disposed of. Nearly all 
had put in an appearance in the dress of their foment, apparently ready 
to start at once upon their duty. 

Outside the hotel, a still more stirring scene was presented. Instead 
of anxious Yeomanry members scrambling for positions which would give 
them an early opportunity of being enrolled, here the civilians wishing to 
enrol themselves as members of the Imperial forces were assembled, and 
they were a very varied selection of all classes of the community. Here a 
smart young farmer, sprucely got*up; there an individual looking for all 
the world as if he had just stepped out of a bandbox ; and yet again the 
man bearing undeniably the stamp of the artisan, and appearing furthermore 
as if he had just left the work which earned him his daily bread. 

Shoulder to shoulder stood the artisan with his more favoured fellow- 
man in respect to earthly goods, but all eager to accomplish the self-same 
object, and that to get to the front After standing in rows of about thirty, 
the query was put by someone in authority, *' Are you all standing, in the 
ranks as you wish to be ? " and immediately hurried steps were taken from 
front to rear and rear to front by friends who, as they then chose their 
places, desired so to stand facing the enemy on the soil of South Africa. 
Shortly after they were marched, a merry enough lot, to the yard of the 
Maid's Head. Before being dismissed, they were sworn in by the magistrates 
in attendance, and conveyed to the cavalry barracks, where they were tested 
as to their fitness in the riding school. As quickly as one batch was 
dispatched another was being prepared, and so the work proceeded. The 
whole day the approaches to the rooms were besieged, and no light work 
had the officers who were in charge. The men who thus presented them- 
selves for examination came from Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, and Cambridge- 
shire. 

The Loyal SufTolks were called upon to find out of this assemblage 
two squadrons of 120 men and five officers. They were numbered the 43rd 
and 44th respectively, and bore the title of Suffolk. 

The 43rd Suffolk Squadron of the Imperial Yeomanry was composed 
as under : — 

Captain J. R. Harvey, Captain in Suffolk Yeomanry 
Lieut. W. R. Greene, Captain in Suffolk Yeomanry 

„ R. O. Kerrison, Lieut in Suffolk Yeomanry 

„ jl, L^rawiey, „ „ „ 

„ G. Buxton. 



II If II 



And the roll of the squadron, with their addresses, is as under, those with 



Officers of the 43rd Squadron Imperial Yeomaory, raised in Norwich by the Loyal 
Suffolk Hussars for service in South Africa, 1900. 



Lieut. G. C. BUXTON. Likut. R. O. KERRISON. 

Lieut. H. E. CRAWLEY. Capt. akd Lieut. W. R. GREENE. 

CAPr. J. R. HARVEY (Commanding 43RD). 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 339 



an asterisk belonged to the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, the remainder being 
civilians, specially enlisted for the war: — 

43RD Imperial Yeomanry. 

ROLL OF NO. I TROOP 

♦Capt J. R. Harvey, Holmwood, Thorpe, Norfolk. 

♦Capt W. R. Greene, Nether Hall, Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. 

Colour-Sergeant T. Mantle, Beccles, Suffolk. 

'''A. E. Howe, Beccles, Suffolk. 

*Farrier F. Prime. 

*Sergeant P. Jonas, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. 

♦Corporal C. Cross, Postwick, Norfolk. 

Bugler H. R. Youngs, Norwich. 

Privates. 
*H. G. Andrews, Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. 
R. Armes. 

W. Atkins, Norwich. 
J. Ballam, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 
♦E. R Brown, Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. 
*H. Cook, Ingatestone^ Essex. 
A. B. Flowerdew, Scole, Norfolk. 
E. F. Flowerdew, Scole, Norfolk. 
T. H. Gardiner, Ashley, Hants. 
C C. Gates, Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. 
*W. P. Green, London. 
*F. H. Heal, Cambridge. 
V. R Hoare, Fakenham, Norfolk. 
A. T. Laud, Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. 
G. H. Long, Balsham, Cambridge. 
♦J. H. Nice, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 
O. S. Nunn, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 
*S. M. Oliver, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 
*S. Pond, Newmarket 
'''A. I.M Purkis, Pampisford, Cambridge. 
C. H. Rodwell, Burton, Lincolnshire. 
H. J. Slater. 

*S. Tebbit, Milton, Cambridge. 
*W. R. Thorpe, Methwold, Brandon, Norfolk. 
*N. R. Wells. 

A. F. Wood, Balsham, Cambridge. 
*J. S. Yelloly, Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk, 



.../ i. 



340 The Records of the YeomoMry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900, 



TROOP NO. a 

* Lieut. G. C. Buxton, Dunston Hall, Norfolk. 
♦Sergeant R. W. Wood, Holt, Norfolk. 
Corporal J. B. Kellett Long, Flordon, Norfolk. 

* „ G. Reeve, Norwich. 

* „ W. E. Scely, London. 
'•''Lance-Corporal S. H. Kidman, Wroxhanii Norfolk. 

* „ „ W. Vincent. Whtnburgh, Norfolk. 
A. A. Vow, Norwich. 

Bugler G. Pickering, Ipswich. 

Privates. 
N. Allen. 

G. W. Beck, Ormesby, Norfolk. 
*A. E. A. Beck, Drayton, Norfolk. 
S. Beck, Ormesby, Norfolk. 
F. G. Chamberlin, Norwich. 
C. J. Carman, Homing, Norfolk. 
*W. Finch. 

A. C. Grimwade, Hadleigh, Suffolk. 
J. P. Green. 

H. D. Hunter, Cossey, Norfolk. 
*R. N. Hughes, Wighton, Walsingham, Norfolk. 
*H. Haldinstein, Norwich. 
R. Kay, Norwich. 
*F. Lister, Becks Hill. 
*G. K. Millard, Hethel, Norfolk. 
*F. W. Myhill, Hethel, Norfolk. 
F. Smith, Woodbridge, Suffolk. 
E. N. Smee, Long Mel ford, Suffolk. 
*H. R. Scheureman, Ipswich, Suffolk. 
C. Steward, Norwich. 

TROOP NO. 3 

*Lieut E. Crawley, 29, Albert Hall Mansion, London, S.W. 
♦Sergeant W. Clarke, Billinghurst, Sussex. 
^Corporal W. Francis, Beccles, Suffolk. 
Shoeing-Smith W. Sutterby. Swaflfham, Norfolk. 
Saddler C. Nooth, Norwich. 

Privates. 
': A. Avila, Theydon Bois, Essex. 
A. J. Bostock, Horsham, Sussex. 
*W. A. Blyth, Essex, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, i gcx). 34 1 



J. Christy, Writtle, Chelmsford, Essex. 

*C. J. Cottis, Epping, Essex. 

*H. Crozeir, Chelmsford, Essex. 

-^'C. Clarkson, Newcastle. 

W. S. Duckett, Leighlin Bridge, Carlow, Ireland. 

F. Fairlie, Billericay, Essex. 

S. V. Green, Romford, Essex. 

T. W. Green, London. 

*H. C. Hales, Chelmsford, Essex. 

A. C. Hastings, London. 

*W. S. Haxley, London. 

M. W. Jaggs, Chelmsford, Essex. 

H. P. Mills, Cromer, Norfolk. 

*W. A. Newson, London. 

O. B. Power, Langford, E. Somerset. 

J. Rogers, London. 

*W. Riggs, Chelmsford, Essex. 

C L. Shaw, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 

W. C. Sowells, Horsley, Gloucestershire. 

F. W. Whitmore, Chelmsford, Essex. 

*G. C. Willis, Dunmow, Essex. 

TROOP NO. 4 

^Lieut. R. O. Kerrison, Tattingstone Place, Ipswich, Suffolk. 
'^Sergeant W. E. Bulman, Cambridge. 
Corporal L. Digby, Chalming^ton, Dorchester. 
Sergt G. W. Ingle (Shoeing Smith). 

Privates. 
H. R. Aldiss, Swaffham, Norfolk. 
H. J. Alien, Bury St Edmund's, Suffolk. 
R. J. Baker. 
*P. C. Bishop, London. 
F. H. Carwardine, Lowestoft, Suffolk. 
H. Calver, Docking, King's Lynn, Norfolk. 

F. Christmas, Cambridge. 

"^C. Chambers, Saxmundham, Suffolk. 

H. A. Church, Colchester, Essex. 

W. L. Colls, Norwich. 

A. L. Curtis. 

R. G. Eraser, Chelmsford, Essex. 

G. N. Goldfinch. 



342 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalty of Norfolk, 1900. 



P. Hovey. 

*C. B. Jolly, Ipswich, Suffolk. 

H. A. Kent, Chippenham, Cambridge. 

F. H. Marshall, Norwich. 

H. B. Morris, Norwich. 

H. Showell, Stourton Hall, Stourbridge. 

W. G. Smith, WoodbHdge, Suffolk. 

H. H. Walford, Ipswich, Suffolk. 

F. L. Walford, London. 

W. Wilson, Wendling, E. Dereham, Norfolk. 

The 44th Suffolk Squadron of the Imperial Yeomanry was composed of: — 

Captain C. B. Rickards, late Lieut Royal Munster Fusiliers. 
Lieut C. Earle, Capt 5th Battalion Middlesex Regiment 

„ Ji M. Wilson, Lieut Norfolk Artillery Militia. 

„ A R. Buxton, Suffolk Yeomanry Cavalry. 

„ Hon. W. E. Guinness, Suffolk Yeomanry Cavalry, 
and 120 rank and file. 

From the above it will be seen that the 43rd had the whole of the 
volunteers from the Loyal Suffolk Hussars as they had all five officers 
and sixty men who were serving in the rq^iment Whereas, the 44th had 
only two officers and no man who had served in the home regiment. The 
roll of this unit I have been unable to obtain. 

There was not another home Yeomanry Regiment, which sent such a 
large proportion of its officers to the front as the Loyal Suffolks did. 

The following officers of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, volunteered and 
proceeded to South Africa : — 

Colonel A. C. Lucas, Deputy Adjutant-General. 

Lieut-Colonel R. B. Colvin, Commanding 20th Battalion. 

Major E. W. D. Baird, Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Captain W. R. Greene, Lieut 43 rd Squadron. 

Captain J. R. Harvey, Commanding 43rd Squadron. 

Captain Sir S. H. L. Stuart, Bart, Commanding Advanced Base Depdt 

Lieut. R. O. Kerrison, Lieut 43rd Squadron. 

Lieut F. W. Jarvis, Colonial Corps. 

Lieut H. E. Crawley, Lieut 43rd Squadron. 

Lieut. G. C Buxton, Lieut 43rd Squadron. 

Lieut Hon. W. E. Guinness, Lieut 44th Squadron. 

Lieut A. R. Buxton, Lieut. 44th Squadron. 



s 



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s 

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*** ai trt 



5 b : 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, iqcx). 343 

The 43rd were the first to be equipped and dressed in their khaki- 
coloured clothing, and an unusual sight they presented as they marched 
through the streets of Norwich. Every morning for the next three weeks 
they were taken up to Household and thoroughly instructed in their 
mounted duties. 

The following letter was sent to the local Press by the Earl of 
Leicester, the Lord-Lieutenant of Norfolk : — 

*' Sir, 

" As many Norfolk men are now gallantly volunteering to join the 
Imperial Yeomanry Corps about to proceed to South Africa under the 
command of Lord Chesham, I wish to appeal for a subscription to a fund 
for their proper equipment. There are many necessaries which cannot be 
obtained with the Government allowance. The Norfolk troop will form a 
contingent of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars. I am advised that it is most 
important that a machine gun should be provided ; most of the regiments 
in the Imperial Yeomanry are taking out with them a quick firing gun 
which has been locally subscribed for. Subscriptions to the 'Fund for 
the Equipment of the Norfolk Yeomanry Troops,' to which I have much 
pleasure in forwarding £200 (two hundred pounds) may be forwarded to 
Messrs. Barclay & Co., Ltd, Norwich. 

"LEICESTER, Lord Lieutenant. 
"Holkham, Norfolk." 

The following letter was also sent to the members of the West Norfolk 
Hunt :— 

Gentlemen, 

We have written to Colonel Cruickshank, commanding the Loyal 
Suffolk Hussars at Norwich, expressing the wish of the Hunt Committee 
that the proceeds of the Fund being raised by the Hunt should be 
applied rather to the actual comforts of the men themselves than to the 
*' Equipment Fund" or "purchase of machine guns," &c. His reply is as 
follows : — 

"Norwich, ist February, 1900. 

"Dear Sir, 

"I am obliged to you for your letter, and I must beg you to 
accept and to convey to the members of the West Norfolk Hunt my 
heartiest appreciation of their kindness and liberality in raising a fund 
for the assistance of the men who are joining the two squadrons of 
Imperial Yeomanry that I am raising here. 



344 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 900. 



" I quite grasp and fully agree with your idea of the disposal of / the 
fund. I think that the men will be very grateful for extra luxuries, more 
particularly on first landing in South Africa, and until they get settled 
down to the every day life of a campaign. Should you think fit to 
entrust the distribution of the Fund to ray hands, I should propose to divide 
the amount equally between the two squadrons, and entrust the fund to 
the officer commanding each squadron, with full instructions for the use 
of it in the manner I have suggested. Again thanking you most sincerely, 

•* Believe me, yours very truly, 

•IF. H. E. CRUICKSHANK, Lieut-Col., 

'*G>mmanding Loyal Suffolk Hussars." 



Subscriptions flowed in from all quarters of the county. Lady Greene, 
of Nether Hall, Suffolk, mother of Capt R. Greene, M.F. ; Mrs. Geoffrey 
Buxton, of Dunston Hall, whose son had volunteered with the 43rd ; Mrs. 
Robert Harvey, whose husband was in command of it. and Mrs. Kerrison, 
of Tattingstone, mother of Lieut R. O. Kerrison, were most energetic in 
organizing the fund for sending out luxuries to the Yeomen who were 
proceeding to the front 

Lord Iveagh, of Elvedon Hall, equipped and sent out a hospital fully 
equipped. The donations towards the Imperial Yeomanry Hospital Fund 
reached large dimensions in the county of Norfolk. 

Mr. Gee, of the firm of Miller & G>., Tobacconists, London Street, 
Norwich, with the characteristic interest which he has always displayed 
towards the military in Norwich, kindly presented every Yeoman with a 
briar pipe. I need hardly say how appreciative all the men were for such 
a handsome present, showing then as it does the kindly thoughts that are 
rooted in the hearts of our Norwich citizens. 

The Hon. Florence Amherst also sent a supply of tam-o'-shanters ; in 
fact everyone vied with one another at this period in sending something 
fowards the fund, and it would be far outside the scope of this work, if 
I were to mention all the kind friends who evinced an interest in this 
Yeomanry movement 

The time was occupied fully with training the men and horses. Batches 
were sent down to the rifle range at Great Yarmouth, to make themselves 
proficient in the use of the Lee-Metford rifle, with which they were armed. 

The men were drilled daily, on foot in Britannia Barracks, and mounted 
on Mousehold Heath. Horses were coming in daily, as very few of the 
men found their own horses, for which a Government allowance of £4p was 
made. The men were billetted all over the city, though a large number 
found their own apartments. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ i9CX>. 345 

The men were attired in khaki-coloured jacket and breeches and putties 
to match ; for boots they had the ordinary lace ankle boot with spurs. The 
hat was of a slouch pattern, with one side looped up, without any plume. 
There were no facings of any sort on the uniform. 

The saddlery of the squadrons, before being served out to the men, 
were stored in Coleman's Rooms on Bank Plain, and Messrs. Philo and Son 
of Tombland, the well-known firm of saddlers, were given an order for 
most of the furniture required for it, and for many weeks a large staff of 
men were kept busy there night and day. 

On January 27th, the men of the 43rd received orders to fall in and 
attend a farewell service at Norwich Cathedral, which had been arranged 
for them by Dean Lefroy. 

The Yeomanry paraded at the Cavalry Barracks, and headed by the 
band of the 7th Hussars, marched by way of Bishop Bridge Road, Riverside 
Road, and Prince of Wales' Road and through Tombland to the Cathedral, 
crowds of people lining the streets and collecting on all the open spaces. 
Two mounted officers of the Norwich City Police cleared the way, which 
was almost as dirty and dark as any road they had afterwards to traverse 
in South Africa. 

The Cathedral was entered by the Great West door. Here they were 
also joined by the members of the active service company of the Norfolk 
Volunteers, under the command of Captain Archdale, with Lieuts. B. H. Leathes 
Prior and H. Willett A large congregation had assembled in the Nave 
of the Cathedral where the service took place. Among the officers present 
were Colonel Shepherd (commanding the 9th Regimental District), the 
Mayor (Mr. J. W. Clabburn), the Sheriff (Mr. S. Wainwright), the two 
members for Parliament for the city (Sir S. Hoare and Sir H. Bullard), with 
all the officials of the Corporation. The Dean preached the sermon, his 
text being, **My presence shall go with thee, and I will give thee rest" 
(Exodus xxiv. 14). The Benediction being pronounced by the Dean, the 
vast audience joined in singing the National Anthem. 

Mr. Alfred Haldinstein, whose son was one of the troopers in the 
43rd squadron, entertained the members of the 43rd to a dinner at the 
Drill Hall of the ist Vol Batt Norfolk Regt The chair was taken by 
Mr. Haldinstein, who was supported by the Mayor of Norwich (Mr. J. 
Clabburn), the Dean of Norwich, the Sheriff, the Deputy Mayor (Mr. G. H. 
Morse), Sir Harry Bullard, Colonel Cruickshank, Captain J. R. Harvey, 
Lieut Crawley, Lieut. G. Buxton, Lieut. R. Kerrison, Mr. E. J. Caley, Mr. 
A. E. Soman, and others. After dinner, which was served by Mr. H. L. Clarke 
of the Maid's Head, Quartermaster Heal of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, who 
acted as toast-master, said he had been asked by the Chairman to read 



346 The Records bf the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 900. 



telegrams and letters of regret from Sir Samuel Hoare, M.P., Sir E. Birkbeck 
and others, that they were unable to be present. Various toasts were drunk 
with great enthusiasm, and the band of the 7th Hussars played during the 
dinner, after which there was an entertaining pn^pramme of vocal music 
That the entertainment provided was thoroughly appreciated was very evident 
and the kindness which prompted it even more so. 

On the 30th January, General Abadie, C.B., commanding the Eastern 
District, inspected the 43rd squadron of Suffolk Yeomanry at the Cavalry 
Barracks in the afternoon. General Abadie, who was accompanied by Captain 
Charles Hall, his aide-de-camp, arrived at Thorpe a little after one o'clock, 
and at once proceeded to the Cavalry Barracks, where the 43rd squadron 
awaited hinL They had paraded on St Martin-at-Palace Plain at 12.45, 
and had reached the Cavalry Barracks by way of Barrack Street at 1.20. 
Captain J. R. Harvey was in command, and Lieutenants Greene, Kerrison, 
Crawley, and Buxton were also on parade, together with every trooper in 
the squadron, to the number of 120. The squadron rode past the inspecting 
officer in single file amidst a sharp storm of rain and sleet, which wetted 
them to the skin. They were all fully equipped, and attired in khaki After 
having ridden past in file, the squadron proceeded by troops to the ridii^ 
school, where they were able to show to the General that they were good 
horsemea After having satisfied him in all respects, that they were fit in 
every way to take service in the field, they were dismissed to their billets, 
but not for long, as that evening they paraded for the last time in the city 
before proceeding to South Africa. The parade was fixed to be at St Maftin's 
Palace Plain at 8.45 p.m., but long before that hour Tombland and all its 
approaches were crowded with dripping but enthusiastic citizens. The night 
was densely dark as well as wet, and the forms of the Yeomanry could 
scarcely be distinguished as they trotted through Tombland to take up 
their positions in their respective troops on the Plain. The clatter of their 
horses' hoofs, however, was always a signal for an outburst of cheering, and 
when one or two of them waved small flags, presumably the Union Jack, 
the enthusiasm became tumultuous. St Martin's Palace Plain was a little 
quieter, as it was impossible to distinguish cavalry from trees or lamp posts, 
and how the men found their proper places must for ever remain a mystery. 
Were it not for the fact that most of the window blinds of the houses were 
up, and the thoroughfare was thus lighted up privately, the men might 
have ridden into the Palace grounds instead of on to the Plain. Captain 
Harvey was in command, his four officers were also all present, and so were 
the whole of the squadron ; and shortly before nine o'clock the order was 
given to march. The band of the 7th Hussars, who were unmounted, struck 
up, and amidst hoarse cheering the squadron moved off. 



i 

So 

Si 

ai 



S u 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 347 

The squadron proceeded to Trowse by way of Tombland, the Cattle 
Market, Ber Street, and Bracondale, where the band left them. Trowse 
Station Yard reached, no time was lost in getting into the business of the 
evening. A strong body of the City Police guarded the approaches of the 
station, and courteously but firmly, tried to keep mere sight-seers from 
entering. But walls can be scaled, and aided by the darkness, a great 
many persons got in. Their agility, however, was scantily rewarded, for it 
was too dark to see much. Among others who were there to see the last 
of their friends and relations, were Mrs. Geoffrey Buxton, who had hot 
chocolate ready for the officers, among whom was her eldest son ; Mr. and 
Mrs. George Chamberlin, whose eldest son was serving as a trooper; Mr. 
Haldinstein, who also had a son in the ranks. 

The men soon dismounted, and rapidly unsaddled and packed the harness 
into the luggage vans. The horses were taken to one of the cattle sidings, 
and were entrained as speedily as possible. The majority of them were 
placed in large cattle trucks, which, however, were covered and closed with 
tarpaulins. The officers' chargers were favoured with horse boxes. The 
work of entraining the horses was difficult and trying, but it was accomplished 
without a hitch. Under the best of circumstances, it is no easy matter to 
get horses into a railway truck, and this night the surroundings did not 
facilitate the business. To begin with, it was pitch dark, windy and wet, 
and the only light available was that obtained from a few hand lamps. Then 
most of the horses were strange to the operation, and not a few of the 
men were engaged in the task for the first time in their lives. Despite 
these difficulties the work was completed before eleven o'clock, and then 
the men turned into the Pine Apple, where they were supplied with a 
substantial supper. 

At a quarter past eleven the order was given to fall in, and the men 
were drawn up on the up platform. The carriages appeared shortly 
afterwards, and were rapidly filled, but the men had no sooner entered them 
than they thrust their heads out of the windows and chatted with their friends. 
The scene was now one of intense excitement. The people on the platform 
or a lai^e number of them, shouted patriotic songs till they were hoarse, women 
were seen again and again kissing the faces thrust through the windows, and 
hand-shaking was going on from one end of the train to the other. A hundred 
farewells were said to every man, and still the people hung round the carriage 
doors. Waiting for the hour of departure was evidently a trying experience 
for some of them, but the Yeomanry themselves appeared to be in the best 
of spirits. At last the moment of departure arrived, and the railway 
officials passed from end to end of the train gently but firmly clearing the 
people from the footboards. A short, sharp whistle, and the train began 




34^ "The Records of the Yeomanry Cavairy of Morfolk^ 1906. 



to move slowly out of the station. A tremendous roar of applause came from 
the crowd, and continued till the tail lights had disappeared round the curve. 
Then ^ Auld Lang Syne " was sung and the people rapidly dispersed, passing 
out into the wet and mud and darkness. 

The Great Eastern Railway Company had made most complete arrange- 
ments for the entrain ment of the men and horses. Cattle trucks were provided 
for one hundred horses, and horse boxes for fifteen chargers, while cars were 
supplied for five officers and 116 men. The train was made up of four 
passenger carriages, two guards vans, thirteen cattle trucks and five horse 
boxes. 

The route taken was via Cambridge, Tottenham, and Gunnersbury, where 
the London and South Western system was entered upon. 



1900. 
These verses were written by Miss Hinde, just before the departure of 
the Suffolk Yeomanry. 



Au Revoir, but not Good-bye to the Suffolk Yeomanry. 

Turn to " The Miminl Bay^ 

Our Suffolk men to the wmr have gone, 

In the ranks of death yoa'U find some ; 
Those who are left do not despair, 
Bat follow on behind them. 
Gird on your swords, and bravely try. 

And may our God defend you ; 
For Queen and country yon must fight, 
And may good luck attend you. 

Dear Suffolk lads, our native kin. 

We never shall forget you, 
May you go on, and win the cause. 
And may the Lord protect 3^u. 
Make up your minds to die or dare, 

The youthful and the hoary, 
Together lads, straight on the path, 
To win your way to glory. 

And those you leave behind shall find. 

That we will do our part. 
To cheer and help the weary one, 

With a true and willing heart. 






*4 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1 900. 349 



Now go, brave hearts, remember us, 

When on the veldt or field, 
Be sure our prayers are pouring forth. 

That God your life shall shield. 

And when you home to us return 

Our welcome sbaU be hearty; 
We'll greet you (not) with three times three. 
But with three times three and thirty. 
And so good-bye, dear Suffolk lads, 

Go forth and do your duty, 
Return again with Nelson's words, 
"For England, Home and Beauty." 

H. H., Norwich. 

The train conveying the 43rd squadron arrived about eight the next 
morning at Southampton, and the work of conve)ring the horses on board 
the Union Liner, ''Goth/' was at once proceeded with. The contingent to 
be placed on board comprised 240 men and 240 horses, drawn from the 
Loyal Suffolk Hussars, and the Hants Carabineers. The bulk of those 
who came to see the gallant Yeomen off were friends and relatives, and 
when the time came to go ashore they clung tenaciously to the ship, and 
it took a deal of persuasion on the part of the ship's officers to prevail on 
those whose business was not taking them to South Africa, to leave the 
vessel. Nor did the leave-takings end here, for the Suffolk Hussars were 
the recipients of royal farewell greetings. In answer to a loyal and 
respectful message from the corps, Colonel Lucas received a telegram from 
the Queen, which ran as follows : *' The Queen thanks you and the ist 
Company of the Duke of York's Loyal Suffolk Hussars for your loyal 
telegram, and wishes you God speed and all success. — (Signed) Edwardes." 
The Duke of York, who is Hon. Colonel of the corps, also sent the 
following telegram to Captain J. R. Harvey, commanding the squadron : — 

''I wish you and men of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, God-speed and 
a safe return. (Signed) George." 

This reply was then sent to the Duke of York : — 

*' Captain Harvey, non-commissioned officers and men of the Loyal 
Suffolk Hussars beg to thank your Royal Highness for kind message and 
good wishes." 

If the two squadrons which sailed from Southampton were fair 
examples of the Imperial Yeomanry, it can only be said that a fine sturdy 



350 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 



body of men were on their way to the seat of war. They were for the 
most part thick-set, powerfully built men, the picture of ruddy health and 
good training, splendid types of countrymen. They fell quickly into the 
ways of the regular soldier, and went about their duties of getting the 
horses on board and embarking kit and stores in a thoroughly business- 
like manner. The work proceeded smoothly and without hitch, and 
consequently the "Goth" was able to get away early in the afternoon. 

The men were perhaps fortunate in beginning a soldier's life under 
such favourable conditions. The ''Goth" made a splendid transport, she 
had a tonnage of 4,700, and gave the impression of being a comfortable 
boat This was, in fact, her third trip out as a transport. On the troop 
decks there was plenty of space and ventilation, being far less crowded 
than when some of the Regulars went out in her. Only six men were 
placed in a mess, and as the catering was in the hands of the Union 
Company, they began with the luxury of table-clotha Moreover, the food 
was both good and abundant. As an instance of one day's menu, 
breakfast consisted of porridge. Finnan haddock, bread and butter, with 
tea and coffee; for dinner there was soup, roast beef and mutton, potatoes, 
cabbage, and pastry ; and for tea, cold meats, pickles, jam, buns, bread and 
butter, with tea. With regard to their uniform, there was not that rigid 
adherence to pattern associated with the Regular troops. All, it is true, 
wore the serviceable khaki jacket, with breasted pockets and slouch hats; 
but, while a number wore khaki breeches many wore ordinary, but good 
serviceable breeches, while a very considerable dissimilarity of leg coverings 
existed. There were leather gaiters, leather putties, and putties of all 
shades, from a pale drab to an aggressive chrome tint. All carried a 
webbed bandolier and a grey great coat, and other necessary equipment. 
The Hussars were placed aft, the forward portion of the ship being 
reserved for the Hants Dragoons. The officers were accorded first-class 
accommodation, and among those sailing with the Suffolk Yeomanry were: 

Captain J. B. Seeley 

Lieut. C. H. Heseltine 

., R. A. Johnson ^Hampshire Imperial Yeomanry 
„ G. Heseltine (Carabineers) 

„ B. E. Green well , 

together with Dr. Manders and Vet. Surgeon Revel. 

It took a good half-hour to persuade the numerous friends and 
relatives that their presence on board was delaying the departure of the 
ship. At length, by dint of much coaxing, ringing the ship's bell, and 
sounding the syren, the visitors allowed themselves to be turned on the 
quayside. The last to leave was General Sir Baker Russell, who 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 351 



accompanied by Lord Northbrook (the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire), 
Sir Francis Evans, M.P., Chairman of the Union Company, Colonel 
Stacpole, and the other embarkation officers, inspected the Yeomen 
mustered on the troop deck. Then at last the gangway was cast off, and 
as the good vessel moved away, cheering long and hearty went up from 
ship and quayside, and continued with unabated fervour until the "Goth," 
under the command of Captain Travers, had nearly vanished into the 
mists of the afternoon of the 31st of January, 1900. 

The 44th Suffolk squadron, with the before mentioned officers, left 
Norwich on March 3rd, and proceeded to Southampton, where they 
embarked on the s.s. "Cornwall," arriving at Cape Town on March 
28th. I have not been able to obtain any information as to thdr 
wanderings and work at the seat of war, but they performed whatever 
they were called upon to do with credit They early lost the services 
of their commanding officer, and from circumstances over which they 
doubtless had no control, they became very weak in numbers, and never 
came home to England as a unit complete. 

The 43rd, after an uneventful voyage, arrived at Cape Town, on 
February 25th, and went under canvas at Maitland, about three miles 
outside the town. Here they were employed in drilling and musketry, 
and also renewing any equipment that was necessary. They lefl Maitland 
on March 7th, and proceeded by train to De Aar, where they were again 
placed under canvas. Lord Kitchener then arrived, and commenced 
organizing a column to operate against the rebels, who had seized the 
towns of Prieska and Kenhardt. The column was a mixed one, composed 
of two batteries Field Artillery, 7th Dragoon Guards, Suffolk Regiment, 
and the Hants, Staffords, Suffolks, Cheshires, Lancashires, Derbyshire 
Yeomanry, together with Kitchener's Horse, the Australian, and C.I.V. 
Mounted Infantry. Altogether, the column comprised about 3,000 men and 
2,500 horses. Lord Kitchener was in command, and the Yeomanry were 
commanded by Colonel Mahon, 8th Hussars. This force marched from 
De Aar on March 12th, and proceeded at the rate of about twenty miles 
a day, via Spyfontein, Britstown, Howater, Omraai Vlei, to Prieska. The 
last march was a forced one, about forty-two miles, as it was hoped to 
surprise the rebels; but alas, they fled at the approach of the column, 
without firing a shot, and all that remained to be done, was to occupy 
the town of Prieska for two days and rehoist the Union Jack. Part of 
the column was then ordered to proceed to Kenhardt, but the Suffolks 
returned to De Aar, and a very unpleasant time they had, as they 
marched for the three days in a pouring rain, without tents of any sort, 
and to make matters worse, the food supply ran short. However, Lord 



352 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 



Kitchener expressed himself as being very pleased with the performance 
of the Yeomanry, and personally complimented Captain Harvey on the 
43rd Suflfolk squadron. 

On arriving back at De Aar, they were ordered to proceed by train to 
Naaupoort, where they were formed into a regiment with the Hants and 
Staffords Yeomanry, under Colonel Blair of the Leicestershire Yeomanry. 

On April Tth, Captain Harvey was ordered to take the 43rd to 
Arundel, thence to Colesberg, Norvals Pont, Priors Siding, by march route, 
as convoy to some waggons of supplies. They then proceeded to Springfontein, 
where they joined a force under General Rundle, and they were placed in 
the Yeomanry Brigade under General Brabazon. The objective of this 
force was Dewetsdorp. They first exchange shots with the Boers on 
April 1 8th, when they came in contact with the Boer outposts at RosendaL 
For several days after this they were the object of the enemy's attention, 
but conducting their operations as they did in very extended order, they 
escaped any casualties. On April 21st, they left camp at 5.30 in the 
morning as an escort to a battery of artillery. The scouts came in touch 
with the enemy, and there ensued some smart rifle firing. The guns shelled 
the Boers, and they retired. The 43rd were ordered to follow the enemy 
up, but they were greeted with such a heavy fusillade that they had to 
abandon the attempt All that day the Boers shelled the British camp, 
throwing into it no fewer than sixty shells without, however, harming any- 
body. The Boer shells were generally bad, many of them failing to explode. 
At daybreak the following day the British shifted their camp to avoid the 
Boer shells, and advanced nearer to Dewetsdorp. The 43rd were again 
ordered out to escort the 69th Field Battery, and when reconnoitring came 
under a heavy rifle fire from the Boers, who held a very strongly entrenched 
position. 

There was a good deal of desultory fighting round Dewetsdorp at this 
period, in all of which the 43rd SufTolks took their share every day. On 
April 25th, a general advance was made on the town, and General Brabazon 
made a wide turning movement with his Yeomanry brigade, but on arrival 
there they found that the Boers had fled during the night, taking with 
them their guns and convoy, so that the British occupied it under General 
Rundle without resistance. 

Wepener, then closely invested by the Boers, was the next objective ; 
and the 43rd formed part of the mounted force under General Brabazon, 
which was sent to its relief. 

The town had been besieged for eighteen days by six thousand of the 
enemy, and it was garrisoned entirely by a colonial force, under Colonel 
Brabant As soon, however, as the relieving force approached, the Boers 
decamped and beat a retreat into the Thebanchu district. 



The Records of the Yeonumry Cmalry of Norfolk, 1900. 353 



On returning to Dewetsdorp, the 43rd were ordered to remain in 
garrison there, where they remained until May 26th, when they were 
ordered to march to Bloemfontein. 

About May 20th, Lieut. Ernest Crawley left us sick, and proceeded to 
Bloemfontein, where he was admitted into hospital with enteric fever. He 
did not join the squadron again. His troop was broken up and the men 
divided amongst the other three troops. 

On arrival at Bloemfontein they received orders to escort a convoy of eighty 
waggons via Glen, Karee Siding, Allemane, Brandfort, Vet River, Blue 
Drift on the Zand River, Ventersbuif; Road Station, Holfontein, Geneva to 
Kroonstad, where General Knox was in command. Here they remained 
some time, and performed some very useful work in sending out reconnoitring 
patrols round the country daily. 

Whilst at Kroonstad, they received at 12, midnight, on June 14th, orders 
to march as escort to the 17th Battery R,F.A., and proceed to Ventersburg 
Road Station, where they joined a mixed force under Colonel Dalzell, com- 
manding the Oxfordshire Light Infantry. This small force marched towards 
Zand River, which was heavily attacked by the Boers. The garrison, 
however, of this post were enabled to repulse the Boer attack, and so the 
relieving force was recalled back to Ventersbuig Road, where the 43rd 
remained until June 22nd, under command of Colonel Sitwell of the Mounted 
Infantry. Whilst at this railway station, the Suffolks performed some very 
useful work. Their duty being to patrol the line half-way to Zand River 
and Kroonstad. The men were bivouacked alongside the station, whilst 
the officers took up their quarters in the lamp room of the station 
buildings. However, their stay there was not for long, for on June 22nd, 
they were ordered by General Knox to return to Kroonstad, after leaving 
Lieut Buxton and his troop at Zand River, and Lieut Kerrison at 
Holfontein. 

Immediately on arrival at Kroonstad, Captain Harvey received orders 
to proceed to the relief of Lindley with a strong escort, which were to 
convoy some waggons, dragged by steam traction engines. The force 
was composed of the C.LV. battery, two guns of the 17th F.A., the 
Buffs Militia, the Bushman Mounted Corps, all under the command of 
Colonel Brookfield of the 14th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. 

They left Kroonstad on June 24th with this convoy of sixty waggons, 
drawn by these puffing engines, and a certain number of ox transport as 
well. Slow progress was made, and only fifteen miles were made before 
night, when the force bivouacked. 

The 43rd was veiy weak, having left behind two strong detachments, 
so that only twenty-five men under Captain Harvey and Lieut Greene 
were able to march with this column. Z 



354 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, lyoo. 

On the second day of this march, the progress was still slower, in 
consequence of some very bad drifts, which entailed putting^ on double 
spans of oxen to drag over the vehicles. This day they only marched 
five miles, when darkness* overtook them, and a halt was called at an 
iron bridge over a river. The patrols had been fired upon by the enemy 
all day. The column stood to arms at 5 A.M. and marched at 7 A.M., the 
43rd being the rear-guard. Soon after starting the advanced guard came 
into action, and the C.I.V. battery was soon heavily engaged for the first 
time since they had landed in South Africa. The enemy were in considerable 
force, and annoyed us all day, hovering round on both flanks. There was 
another very bad drift to cross, which delayed the convoy some considerable 
time, and the Boers were firing at us all the time. However, they ceased 
to trouble us just before dark, and we were able to settle down in camp 
unmolested. 

On the morning of the fourth day, firing commenced as soon as we 
started. They attacked us on both flanks and afterwards heavily in rear, 
but our guns shelled them away. All this day the 43rd were escort to the 
17th Field Battery, who were in action nearly all the time. On the British 
side our casualities were two officers and twelve men killed and wounded. The 
convoy was pushed slowly forward and Lindley was reached at about 8 
that night, but we had to abandon six waggons about four miles from 
Lindley. These were, however, recovered the next morning. General Paget 
was in command at Lindley, where we stayed three days. The 43rd left 
there on June 30th, in company of some Mounted Infantry, two guns 17th F. A., 
two guns CI. v., three hundred Australian Bushmen, 3rd Battalion Bufis 
Militia. This force, which was under the command of Colonel Brinkman of the 
Buffs, had for its duty the escort of fifty waggons of wounded and fourteen 
prisoners, and three steam traction engines. The force marched unmolested 
about fifteen miles, when the CI.V. guns and the Bushmen returned to 
Lindley, and Colonel Brinkman and his small force reached Kroonstad the 
next day without any incident 

On July 13th Lord Chesham's brigade of Yeomanry marched into 
Kroonstad. 

On July 15th the Suffolks were ordered to march at once and overtake a 
convoy of 120 waggons at America siding, and that the Bucks Yeomanry 
under Capt De Freville would also form part of the escort This march was 
made vi& Honingspruit, Rhenoster River, Vredefort Road, Wolvehoek, 
Sybosele, Viljoens' Drift, Veereeniging, Meyerton, Klip River, Natal Spruit, 
Elandsfontein, to Johannesburg, which was reached on July 23rd. 

The 43rd were not long allowed to remain there, as on July 25 th they 
marched to Bank Station, vi& Florida, Krugersdorp, Randfontein, and 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ iqcxj. 355 



Webster's Farm. Here they joined the force under General Smith-Dorrien, 
who had under him the Shropshire Light Infantry, the CI.V. Battalion under 
Lord Albemarle, two guns of the 20th Field Battery, two howitzers, and 
120 of the Bucks Yeomanry. Smith-Dorrien had been left behind by Lord 
Methuen to watch the railway communication between Krugersdorp and 
Potchefstroom, so as to prevent De Wet crossing the line if possible. The 
column was thus employed in covering the railway line between Bank Station 
and Frederikstad. At the latter place there was a fight with a commando 
under Leibenberg, and it happened thus. On July 31st, when Lieut 
Buxton, who had been out to place some cossack posts at daybreak, suddenly 
came into camp with a Boer bearing a flag of truce. He was brought before 
Captain Harvey in the first instance, and in response as to what he wanted, he 
demanded the surrender of the entire force in half an hour. Captain Harvey's 
answer was emphatic, and the Boer was at once sent to the General, under 
escort, who was encamped about two miles away. The Boers commenced 
firing at once, and some very smart work ensued. In this action Privates 
Steward, Flowerdew, and Showell were badly wounded. The C.LV. Battalion 
and the guns had in the meantime come up in support, and the Boers were 
driven off after about an hour's fighting. The total casualties on our side were 
twelve killed and twenty wounded. The Suffolks on this occasion pursued the 
enemy for about three miles. After this the column moved to Welverddn, 
where there was another small skirmish with the Boers, and Lieut Greene and 
Corporal Kidman, when on patrol, had their horses shot under them, and with 
difficulty escaped on foot On another occasion near here Private Armes was 
taken prisoner. On August 8th, Lord Roberts, expecting De Wet to strike 
due north from the Gatsrand, told Smith-Dorrien to concentrate all his force 
at Bank Station. Smith-Dorrien protested against leaving a gap between 
Bank and Frederikstad, but unsuccessfully, and on August 9th he returned to 
Bank. Unfortunately, though he sent a patrol of the 43rd on the loth to 
watch the Gatsrand from the north, they were not strong enough to stop 
De Wet, while the withdrawal of all troops from the neighbourhood of 
Welverdien had left the Boer general free to cross the railway there 
undisturbed that night. Then it was that the Suffolks joined in the wild 
nightmare of pursuit after De Wet The British columns were hot on the 
trail, and kept stolidly trudging along, with now and then a brief interval, 
not so much for repose, as to take their bearings. Occasionally an obstinate 
rear-guard or a glimpse of the last waggons of the Boer convoy seemed to give 
them the longed for chance of having a blow at the inscrutable enemy, but it 
was only a rear-guard or only the last waggons, and after an inconclusive 
skirmish the stolid trudging would begin all over again, until at last the men 
b^[an to feel that life was one stupid, almost ceaseless march. 



356 The Records of the YeamoHry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900. 



On the 14th, Methaen had a hard march to Doornlaagte. Here he 
commanded all the roads to the west and north-west, and was only a few 
miles from Magato Nek. Kitchener, with whom were the 43rdp was near 
Quaggafontein, covering the road south; and in the morning, Methuen had 
heard that Broadwood was engaged with De Wet's rear-guard on the direct 
road to Olifant's Nek. Thus all seemed turning out as had been planned. 
But just as Methuen's column was reaching camp, tired after their twenty- 
seven miles' march, a native came in to report that De Wet's last waggons 
had been seen going through Olifant's Nek early in the morning. Olifant's 
Nek had not been held, and De Wet and Steyn had escaped. 

It appears that Ian Hamilton had advanced to Zeekoehoek, at the 
end of the Hekpoort Valley, on the 12th, but, instead of sending to hold 
the Nek, thought that he would protect the approach to it sufficiently by 
simply continuing his own movement westwards This decision was most 
unfortunate, the more so as Ian Hamilton's advance westwards was very 
slow. Being to some extent misled by the information telegraphed from 
Pretoria, which in several instances post-dated De Wet's movements by 
twenty-four hours, he only reached a point south-east of the Nek on the 
evening of the day when De Wet slipped through. 

The one lay of consolation for the disconsolate British commanders, 
Methuen, Kitchener, Broadwood, Little, Hart, and Ian Hamilton, after this 
inglorious end to their long chase, was the news, which arrived on August 
15th, that Hore was still holding out at Elands River. 

Kitchener started on the i6th from Quaggafontein with Little's, 
Broadwood's, and Smith-Dorrien's Brigades, and of this force the 45rd 
formed a component part After Carrington had come up and gone away 
again on August 5th, the garrison, though apparently left to their fate, would 
hear nothing of surrender, but made up their minds to fight as long as 
they had ammunition and strength to use it Luckily, they were well 
provided with food, and the Boers, as usual in their sieges, were content to 
sit round and fire at them without seriously attempting to rush the place 
as they should have done. The garrison also kept up their spirits by 
sudden raids. 

Thus, as at Wepener, it became a game of patience for the garrison, 
dissimilar only in this, that at Elands River there was no promise of 
support given to buoy up the garrison with hope. However, on August 
16th, after eleven days' siege, De la Rey moved away on news of the 
approaching relief columns, and Lord Kitchener rode in to set free the 
garrisoa This si^e, like that of Wepener, was especially a Colonial 
triumph; there the garrison had been chiefly Cape Colonials, here the 
majority were Australians, of Carrington's First Brigade, the rest being 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 357 



Rhodestans, and it would be difficult to praise overmoch the determination 
and fine spirit shown by these Colonials in their first opportunity of 
distinguishing themselves as a corps. Every soldier who saw the place 
afterwards expressed surprise that they could have held out so long; as 
the only protection they had from the artillery of the Boers, was their 
waggons formed in a square, with earth piled up as high as the axles. 
Underneath the waggons they had excavated, so that the place was 
honey-combed like a rabbit-warren. But the whole of this work had to be 
performed during the night, as during the day, they were subject to an 
intense fire from the enemy. The Boers had thrown altogether 1,500 
shells into this laager, and the Australians only had one small seven- 
pounder muzzling gun with which to reply. Seventy of the Colonials were 
killed and wounded, and the carcases of 230 horses were dotted round 
the camp, whilst the upper part of the wa^^ons were Uterally shot to 
pieces. 

On August 1 8th, the 43rd joined Lord Chesham's Brigade of 
Yeomanry, which was part of Lord Methuen's division. It consisted of the 
3rd, 5th, and 10th Battalions of Imperial Yeomanry. 

The Suffolks were attached for duty to the lOth R^ment, under the 
command of Colonel Eric Smith, formerly of the Life Guards. Lord 
Methuen complimented Captain Harvey on the appearance of his squadron, 
as although they had been continuously on the march for many months^ 
yet they were able to place in the field over one hundred men and horses 
in admirable condition. 

It was now the duty of the 43rd Sufiblks to march many a weary 
mile under the command of Lord Methuen. With him they traversed the 
greater part of the Western Transvaal The first week of August found 
them at Mafeking refitting. Here some sports were held under the 
patronage of Lord Methuen, and the Suffolks greatly distinguished them* 
selves and won many of the mounted events. Orders were then given to 
traverse the Zeerust country, and then to march to Potchefstroom. At this 
period Methuen was strong, having not only the remains of the old First 
Division, together with General Douglas's column, but also the Rhodesian 
Field Force, which on the departure of Carrington for the north, had been 
reorganized under Brigadier-General the Earl of ErrolL 

Lord Methuen set out on September 7th with two columns, the first 
under his direct command, the second under that of Douglas, while a third 
column ^was formed at Ottoshoop, under Lord ErroU, but owing to 
transport difficulties, took no active part in the operations until the end of 
October. Lieut-General Lord Methuen's column was composed as follows: 
ist Brigade Imperial Yeomanry (Lord Chesham); Munstcr Mounted 



358 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 



Infantry ; 4th Battery, two guns ; 2nd Battery (Rhodesian Field Force), 
two pom-poms; ist Loyal North Lancashire; half 2nd Northampton 
Regiment 

Major-General Douglas's column: 2nd Brigade Rhodesian Field Force, 
including 4th and 5th New Zealanders, and 6th Regiment Imperial Bush- 
men, under Colonel R. Grey ; four guns 88th Battery ; two guns 2nd 
Battery ; two howitzers 37th Battery ; two pom-poms ; ist Northumberland 
Fusiliers ; half 2nd Northamptonshire Regiment 

After a small success on the 12th September, near Lichtenburg, news 
arrived that the garrison of Schweitzer Reneke was hard pressed, and 
Methuen, in co-operation with Settle from Vryburg, was ordered to its 
relief. Marching south he gained touch on September 17th, with a body 
of four hundred Boers, under Tollie de Beer, and pursuing vigorously, 
captured twenty-eight prisoners, a Maxim gun, twenty-six waggons, and 
one of the guns lost at Colenso. On the 22nd, the pressure on 
Schweitzer Reneke being removed, Roberts directed Methuen to proceed 
to Rustenburg, with the object of intercepting President Ste)m, who was 
known to have left the main Boer army, and who might be expected to 
make a dash for the south. On his way to the new objective, Methuen 
fell in with Lemner's Lichtenburgers, near Bronkhorstfontein. The mounted 
troops and guns started away in pursuit; but some of Lemner's men, 
wearing helmets, dressed in khaki, and marching in regular formation, were 
at first mistaken for friends, and managed to get within close range before 
the error was discovered. Among other British casualties this day. 
Captain Lord Loch was severely wounded, while of the Boers, twenty-one 
were killed or captured. When Rustenburg was reached on October 8th, 
Steyn had vanished in the north, and Methuen's next orders were to march 
against De la Rey, who was reported near Bulhoek, westward of the 
Magaliesberg. But De la Rey lay hidden in the bushy kloofs and valleys 
of the Zwartruggens, which, to the very end of the war, were to be the 
despair of British leaders. Under incessant but petty opposition, Methuen 
and Douglas reached Zeerust on October i8th. Here Lieut Raymond 
Greene left the squadron, as he was obliged to proceed home to England 
on urgent and private affairs, and he did not rejoin again. On reaching 
Zeerust, Lord Erroll, leading the ist Brigade of the Rhodesian Field 
Force, joined Methuen, and replaced the 3rd, 5th, and loth Battalions of 
Imperial Yeomanry, who were sent to garrison Ottoshoop. At this period 
Lord Chesham gave up the command of his Yeomanry Brigade and 
proceeded home to England. Methuen now split his own column into two, 
giving command of the mounted men to Lord Erroll. 

ErroU's force now consisted of the Provisional Regiment of Yeomanry, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 359 



commanded by Colonel Willie Lawson, and to this corps the 43rd found 
themselves attached ; the Composite Bushmen Regiment and the Australian 
Imperial Rifles, in all 772. The 43rd were now commencing to feel the 
hardships of the campaign, and they were now reduced to Captain Harvey 
with Lieuts. Kerrison and Buxton, with about seventy men, the rest were in 
hospital and invalided home. 

In consequence. Captain Harvey addressed a letter to Lord Methuen 
through Colonel Willie Lawson, commanding the Provisional Regiment of 
Imperial Yeomanry, to which the 43rd was now attached, pointing out — ^"that 
the 43rd was one of the first Yeomanry units to land in South Africa, and since 
that time, had been practically on the march in different parts of the country. 
Although pleased to serve, they feel that after doing their duty for the past 
nine months, they ought to be entitled to a rest with the remainder of Lord 
Chesham's brigade.'* Captain Harvey also pointed out to Lord Methuen that 
" the best of his horses had been taken away from the 43rd, and handed over 
to another corps ; these were horses which had been throughout the campaign, 
and had been brought out with the Suffolks from England. Also that he 
(Captain Harvey) was in need of a rest ; as from the day on which the 
squadron was raised (2nd January) he had not been away from his duties for 
one single day, and that now he was two officers short of his establishment of 

five." 

This application was forwarded by Colonel Lawson in a letter dated from 

Jacobsdal, 30th October, 190a 

In the course of it he states : — 

^ I think I should state that on the formation of the Provisional Yeomanry 
Regiment, Captain Harvey privately stated his views to me on the selection of 
his squadron for the completion of the Provisional Yeomanry Regiment, and 
said that in his opinion, if another squadron was necessary for the P.Y.R., that 
it should be composed of volunteers from Lord Chesham's Brigade; as his 
squadron had certainly had as much work as any. I have to add, that the 
services of the Suffolk squadron and of Captain Harvey himself, while under 
my command in the Xth I.Y., were of the most exceptional nature." 

The following was the reply of Lord Methuen :— 

To 

OC Provisional Battalion 
Imp. Yeomanry. 

There is no squadron in the Imperial Yeomanry which has done 
finer work than the Suffolk squadron. I had good reasons for making use of 



360 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1900. 



it to foitn an unit in the Provisional Battalion ; for it was at hand, in splendid 
order, fairly strong, and admirably commanded. 

The only statement, I traverse, is that, the war is practically over, and if 
we allow this feeling throughout the division, all I can say is we shall pay for it 
by a considerable loss of life and money. 

For this reason, I will not decrease my numbers, nor will I reduce my 
efforts until this war is over. 

METHUEN, 

L.G 
C 1st div. 
November ist 1900 
Jacobsdal. 

The 43rd, therefore, formed an integral part of the Provisional Battalion of 
Imperial Yeomanry under Colonel Willie Lawson. A few days later Lemner 
was heard of again ; the three columns of Lord Methuen marched out, attacked 
him at Kruisrivier and after a keen pursuit, in which Colonel Grey and the 
Australians were prominent, disposed of some forty Boers and captured 
twenty-one waggons. 

The prospects of the force were just beginning to look bright when orders 
came for General Douglas to leave the western theatre of war and join the 
already numerous forces under General French. He left Zeerust on November 
1st, and reached Klerksdorp on the i6th with a great spoil of cattle and 
waggons, but only twenty-nine prisoners. This withdrawal of 2,370 men, 
including eight hundred excellent mounted troops, though at the time it 
seemed to signify little, was a measure from which the operations in the west 
never completely recovered. Methuen's zeal, however, was undamped. On 
November loth he was again tackling his old antagonist Lemner, this time at 
Wonderfontein, near the Little Marico. Here again forty Boers were killed or 
captured, but no conclusive result was reached Continually opposed by an 
increasing number of enemies he was at Lichtenbui^ on the nth November 
and back at Zeerust on the 19th. Here Captain Harvey and Lieut Kerrison 
left the squadron, they were both played*out and needed a rest The squadron 
which was reduced now to about fifty men and thirty horses was left in charge 
of Lieut Geoffrey Buxtoa They were sent into garrison at 2!eerust, 
where for some time they were practically in a state of siege, and there they 
remained until they returned to England. 

Both Captain Harvey and Lieut. Kerrison appeared before a medical 
board at Cape Town, and were given Staff appointments at the base. 

The 43rd, in this reduced state, remained as part of the garrison at Zeerust 
until they were ordered home with the first contingent of Yeomanry in May, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1900-1901. 361 

1901. They were for some of the time in a state of siege there, and had a very 
rough time of it : but they were well commanded and most ably looked after 
by Lieut. G. C. Buxton, who was the only officer with them, and in conse- 
quence was promoted Captain commanding. In his services during this period 
at Zeerust, Capt. G. C. Buxton was mentioned in dispatches by Lord Methuen, 
and well he deserved it. 



1901. 

The 43rd Suffblks left Cape Town on board the &s. "Manchester 
Merchant," on June 27th, 1901. They numbered forty-six men, under the 
charge of Captain Geoffrey Buxton. 

They landed at Southampton on i8th July, and proceeded to Bury St 
Edmund's. 

The nominal roll of the men of the Suffolks who landed in England 
is appended : — 

Captain G. Buxton. 

Sergeant-Major Mantle. 

Quarter- Master Sergeant Vincent 

Sergeants Wood, Heal, Jolly. 

Farrier-Sergeant Low. 

Corporals Seeley, Kidman, Riggs, Purkis, A. Beck, G. W. Beck. 

Lance-Corporal F. Chamberlin. 

Saddler Nooth. 

Shoeing-Smiths Ingle and Calver. 

Troopers Aldiss, Avila, S. Beck, Blythe, Carman, Chambers, Colls, Coles, 
Duckett, W. P. Green, J. P. Green, J. W. Green, Grimwade, P. C. Hastings, 
A. C. Hastings, Huxley, Hunter, Land, Long, Lister, Jaggs, Millard, Pond, 
Schewermann, Shaw, Slater, Smee, Howells, Smith, Thorpe. 

Total : one officer, forty-six men. 

At Bury St Edmund's the 43rd received a royal welcome; they were 
invited to attend a thanksgiving service at St Marj^'s Church. The squadron 
assembled on Angel Hill, under the command of Captain Geoffrey Buxton, 
and were joined by many of their old comrades, who had returned home 
previously. Then headed by the band of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, they 
marched to the church, where a most impressive service was held. 

After this they were the guests of the Marquess of Bristol, Lord-Lieutenant 
of the county, and the Mayor of Bury St Edmund's (Alderman T. Shillitoe), 
at a ''Welcome Home" luncheon. The luncheon took place in a marquee 
erected in the grounds at Abbey House. 

The Marquess of Bristol presided, and was supported on the right by the 



362 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1901. 



Mayor, and on the left by General Gatacre, others around being Sir E. Walter 
Greene, Bart, M.P., Colonel A. C. Lucas, Captain J. R, Harvey, Captain W. 
Raymond Greene, M.P., Captain G. C. Buxton, Major Baird, Captain Prince 
Frederick Duleep Singh, Captain the Hon. W. Guinness. 

After several toasts had been enthusiastically drunk, the proceedings 
closed with the *' National Anthem," and the 43rd were then marched to the 
Angel Hotel, where they were disbanded. 

The Norwich members of the 43rd, numbering in all twenty-five, arrived at 
Thorpe Station on Saturday -evening, the 20th of July. Their arrival was 
hailed iirith enthusiastic demonstrations on the part of many thousands of the 
citizens. A long time before the train was due — five minutes past six — a vast 
crowd had begun to gather outside the gates of Thorpe Station, notwithstanding 
that the heat of the day was still extreme. In the station yard the procession 
was being hurriedly arranged Mr. Henry Low was marshalling a cavalcade of 
city and county gentlemen, and Mr. Tom Dunmore, acting in consultation 
with the Chief Constable and Colonel Garerd Hill was attending to a good deal 
of general detail. A mounted escort was furnished by the Norfolk Troop of 
the Loyal Suffolk Hussars, under Squadron-Major Giles, and three bands were 
present, those of the 13th Hussars, the Artillery Volunteers and the Rifle 
Volunteers. Among the officers on the platform were Colonel Garerd Hill, 
Colonel Edward Keppel, Colonel G. F. C Buxton, Major Leathes Prior, &c 

The train entered the station pretty punctually, and as the band 
played "Rule Britannia," the men alighted amid the cheers and hearty 
greetings of those who had been allowed on the platform to welcome 
them. They were under the command of Captain G. Buxton, with 
Captain J. R. Harvey, and they quickly formed up and marched into the 
station yard amid further cheering by the crowd. A four-horse brake had 
been brought down to convey the troopers through the city, but it was 
thought better that they should be mounted, and accordingly some of the 
mounted cavalcade placed their horses at the disposal of the men, and 
they themselves took possession of the brake. 

The procession moved out of the gates in the following order: 
Mounted Police, Loyal Suffolk Hussars, the three bands, then the remnant 
of the 43rd Squadron, with Captains Harvey and Buxton riding at their 
head. The route was taken by Prince of Wales' Road, London Street, 
and St. Giles', to the Drill Hall of the Rifle Volunteers, where a guard of 
honour, commanded by Lieut. Smith, was drawn up to salute them. 
Inside the hall, they were received by the Mayor and Mayoress of 
Norwich (Mr. and Mrs. Dawson Paul), with a number of prominent citizens. 
Among others present were : Dean Lefroy, Sir Peter Eade, Messrs. G, 
Jewson, C. Cunnell, G. Green, E. Wild, Sir Harry Bullard, M.P., the 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 190T. 363 



Sheriff and Mrs. Cozens- Hardy, Mrs. Robert Harvey, Mr. E. Board man, 
Mr. G. H. Morse, Mrs. Geoffrey Buxton, Mr. and Mrs. E. Beck, Mr. 
Kidman, Mrs. G. Chamberlin, Canon Duckett, &c. 

More speeches ensued, and the health of the King was drunk by all 
the men in a glass of champagne. This concluded the ceremony, and 
the men shortly afterwards dispersed to their homes. 

On July 27th, 1901, the 43rd and 44th squadrons were present under 
their old officers at the grand medal distribution by King Edward VH. 
on the Horse Guards' parade in London. 

The last function in which they took part was at a dinner given at 
the Maid's Head Hotel, Norwich, by the Mayor of Norwich, Mr. Dawson 
Paul. During this dinner a letter was read from Lord Chesham, as 
under : — 

Latimer, Chesham, August 3, 1901. 

My dear Mr Mayor, 

I am very sorry I am unable to accept your kind invitation 
to the dinner on August 12th, as I have so many engagements I must 
fulfil and my time in England is so short I should much like to have 
met in pleasanter times those whose conduct in the field and rough life in 
South Africa I had seen and admired. The 43rd Squadron joined the 
1st Brigade Imperial Yeomanry on August 19th, 1900, and no better 
squadron formed part of that brigade, and it was equal to any in the 
Imperial Yeomanry. The counties they represent may feel as proud as 
those who served with them in the field were glad of their services. 
They were excellent in action, the same in camp, and adapted themselves 
to all the rough conditions of life cheerfully, and made the best and not 
the worst of all the hard times they underwent I hope they have come 
home none the worse for having done the real good work they have. 

Believe me, yours truly 

CHESHAM, 

Immediately after the royal toasts, which the Mayor proposed, his 
worship distributed a silver badge to each of his guests belonging to the 
Yeomanry. After a most enjoyable evening the gathering broke up with 
the singing of "Auld Lang Syne." 

This ende^ the career of the 43rd and 44th squadrons of Yeomanry. 
They had done their part in the biggest war that England ever had 
been engaged in, and one that taxed her resources of men to the utmost 
They had been in touch with the enemy on many occasions. They had 
been summoned to surrender, an invitation they, through their Captain, 
declined in the good old English style. These lads of the Norfolk 



364 The Records of the Veemanty CmuUfy of Norfolk^ 1901. 



Yeomanry were a standing proof that the hearts of young Britain were in 
the right place, that our Norfolk bo)^ were worthy descendants of the 
good old stock, and that the call to arms in a righteous cause will never 
be disregarded. Long may the Came of the gallant Imperial Yeomanry 
survive, and long may it be ere such another demand is made upon our 
loyalty and devotion. Norwich and Norfolk did well their part in a 
struggle which came closer home to tiie nation at large than any we had 
waged since the eariy part of the last century. These were the lads who 
saved the flag and kept it flying, and they not only well deserved the 
hearty greetings they received, but deserved to have their prowess tangibly 
commemorated somewhere, so that those who read this history of their 
doings may be inspired by the example of their devotion. 



CHAPTER XI. 

1901 to 1908. 

The Raising of the King^s Own Royal Regiment of Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry^ i go i, up to its Absorption into the Territorial Cavalry y 1908. 

1901. 
The County of Norfolk was not to remain long without a corps of Yeomanry 
Cavalry. During the South African War of 1901 the Government saw the 
necessity of increasing this branch of our auxiliary forces. Previous to that the 
total strength of the Yeomanry in Great Britain barely exceeded ten thousand 
men, and it was decided to increase this to 25,000. Many counties in England 
and Scotland which had been for many years without any Yeomanry Cavalry 
were asked to contribute their quota, and Ireland which had not had any 
Yeomanry since the Rebellion of 1798 was also asked to raise two regiments. 
The conditions of service were altered, and the whole force was placed upon a 
very much better footing as regards efficiency and strength. 

In the early part of May, 1901, during the South African War, his 
Majesty King Edward VII. was graciously pleased to direct that a Regiment 
of Yeomanry should be raised in the County of Norfolk. Accordingly he 
caused the Lord-Lieutenant (the Earl of Leicester) to send for Major H; A. 
Barclay, of Hanworth Hall, Norfolk, a Major in the Hampshire Carbineers 
Imperial Yeomanry, and to invite him to undertake the raising and command 
of the regiment Major Barcliay consented 

His Majesty also signified his wish that he should become Honorary 
Colonel, and that the regiment should be designated ^'The King's Own 
Yeomanry," and should be armed and equipped as cavalry. 

He sent for Major Barclay, who kissed hands on appointment as Lieut.- 
Colonel commanding the regiment. 

His Majesty further personally chose the uniform, which consisted of blue 
with yellow facings. The regiment was armed with the sword and Martini 
Lee Enfield Carbine. His Majesty graciously contributed £^00 towards the 



366 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1901. 



starting of the regimental funds, and the following gentlemen generously 
contributed the following subscriptions : — 

Earl of Leicester, K.G. £soo 

Lord Iveagh 500 

Sir Edward Greene, Bart 200 

Lt-Colonel H. A. Barclay 120 

Lord Amherst of Hackney 100 

Lord Farquhar 100 

Sir Samuel Hoare, Bart 100 

High Sheriff (J. N. Gumey, Esq.) 100 

Mayor of Norwich (Russell J. Colman, Esq.) 100 

Lt-Colonel G. F. Buxton, V.D. 100 

S. G. Buxton, Esq, 100 

Sir T. F. Buxton, Bart., G.C.M.G., V.D. 100 

J. H. Buxton, Esq. 100 

Recruiting proceeded briskly, and Colonel Barclay, having divided the 
county into convenient districts for his squadrons, allotted one or more local 
centres to each squadron, where the intending recruit could apply for full 
information regarding the regiment 

The following is a sample of the announcements which appeared in the 
public press at this period , and may prove interesting to a future generation : — 

••July 26, 1901. 

•• Imperial Yeomanry. 
•• King's Own Norfolk Regiment 

•• Recruiting. 

•• Gentlemen wishing to join the • King's Own ' are requested to submit 
their names or make personal application to any of the officers mentioned 
below. 

••A squadron (Norwich and district with headquarters at Norwich) his 
Highness Major Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, Old Buckenham Hall, 
Attleborough ; or Captain G. C. Buxton, Dunston Hall, Norwich; or to 
Second-Lieutenant G. T. BuUard, Anchor Brewery, Norwich. 

•• B squadron (North-East Norfolk, with headquarters at North Walsham), 
Major J. R. Harvey, Holmwood, Thorpe, Norwich ; or to Captain D. Spurrell, 
Bessingham Manor, Aid borough. 

••C squadron (West Norfolk, with headquarters at Fakenham), Major 
C. D. Seymour, Barwick, King's Lynn ; or to Captain A. Elwes, Congham 
House, King's Lyna 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalty of Norfolk, 1901. 367 

^D squadron (South Norfolk, headquarters to be notified later), Major 
A. F. Morse, Earlham Lodge, Norwich. 

*' Full particulars relating to the regiment may be obtained at anytime 
from the Adjutant, Hanworth Hall, Norfolk. 

" Gentlemen desirous of joining should make early application to one of 
the above centres." 



On July 19th, 1901, Captain J. H. Patterson of the 20th Battalion Imperial 
Yeomanry was posted to the regiment as temporary adjutant. 

The first parade of the King's Own Regiment of Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry took place at Holkham, on September lOth, 1901. The Earl and 
Countess of Leicester sent out a special invitation to the members of the 
Norfolk Yeomanry, which at this period had been recruiting up to about three 
hundred, and about two hundred of them responded to meet and hear words of 
encouragement from Lord Chesham, the brother of the Countess of Leicester. 
The company was a large one, and included the following officers : — Colonel 
H. A. Barclay, Major J. R. Harvey, Major C. D. Seymour, Captain A. Elwes, 
Captain Redmond Buxton, Captain Geoffrey Buxton, Lieutenant D. Spurrell, 
Lieutenant Collison, Lieutenant Hon. C. Bateman Hanbury, Lieutenant 
Humphrey Barclay, Lieutenant Gerald Bullard, Lieutenant Gerard Gurney, 
Lieutenant Quinton Gurney, Lieutenant Joseph Barclay, Lieutenant Walter 
Buxton. 

The regiment paraded by squadrons in plain clothes on the Holkham 
Cricket Ground at one o'clock, and were inspected by Major-General Lord 
Chesham, KC.B., after which they sat down to a splendid lunch provided by 
Lord and Lady Leicester. 

The next appearance of the King's Own Norfolk Yeomanry was 
October 17th, 1901, on the occasion when the Countess of Leicester presented 
the South African War medals to between four hundred and five hundred 
Norfolk officers and men who had recently returned from active service at the 
front 

The Yeomanry furnished an escort to the carriage which conveyed the 
Countess from Thorpe Station to Britannia Barracks, and were under the 
command of Colonel H. A Barclay, who had also on parade with him Prince F. 
Duleep Singh, Major J. R. Harvey, and Major A. F. Morse. 

This was the first appearance of the Norfolk Yeomanry in the new uniform 
of the corps, which was striking and unique. 

It consisted of a khaki helmet with brass spike and blue puggaree, blue 
serge tunic with yellow facings and chain shoulder cords, khaki cord breeches, 
tan-coloured gauntlets, brown leather knee boots, and a cartridge bandolier. 



V 



368 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1901. 



Within a very few minutes of her arrival, the Countess commenced the 
presentation. As each came up to her Ladyship, she handed him the medal 
and spoke a word or two of congratulation, and to those who had been 
wounded she extended her kind sympathy. The ceremony was a very cold 
one, and the east wind which blew over Household was somewhat discomfort- 
ing ; but the proceedings passed off with great success, thanks to the excellent 
arrangements which had been made. 

On the 23rd October, 1901, a very signal honour was conferred on the 
regiment, when the following announcement appeared in the London Gazette 
of that date : — 

** Field-Marshal His Majesty the King to be Honorary Colonel of the 
R^ment" 

All ranks were highly gratified at this mark of royal favour, and it proved 
a very powerful stimulus to recruiting, which from this date proceeded very 
briskly. 

The safe return of the Duke and Duchess of York to Sandringham after 
their cruise in the "Ophir," was the next occasion when the services of the 
Norfolk Yeomen were required. 

His Majesty the King expressed a wish that the (King's Own) Norfolk 
Regiment of Yeomanry should find a mounted escort to their Majesties the 
King and Queen, and their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of York, 
from Wolferton Station to Sandringham on 4th November, 1901. About two 
hundred members of the regiment turned out on this occasion, under the 
command of Lieut-Colonel H. A. Barclay. 

Many of these had been collected from the most distant ends of the 
county. They had come from Yarmouth^ Stalham, North Walsham, Aylsham, 
Cromer, Holt, Norwich, Whitwell, Guestwick, and Fakenham ; the Midland 
and Great Northern Joint Railway having run special trains for their con- 
venience from Norwich, Yarmouth, and Cromer to Hillington where they 
detrained for a little preliminary drill in the park of Sir William ffolkes. 
From Hillington to Wolferton they journeyed by road, and Colonel Barclay 
was assisted by the following officers : — 

Major Prince P. Duleep Singh, Major J. R. Harvey, Major C. Seymour, 
Major A. Morse, Captain A. Elwes, Captain G. Buxton, Lieut Collison, 
Lieuts. Spurrell, H. G. Barclay, Keppel, G. Gumey, Q. Gurney. 

On arrival at Wolferton, the men were entertained at lunch in the 
buildings which form part of the spacious quarters set apart for the use of 
the celebrated horses, Persimmon and Diamond Jubilee. At about twenty- 



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The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1901. 369 



five minutes past three the royal train steamed into Wolferton Station* 
A few bars of the National Anthem from the band announced the arrival 
of the King and Queen and their children, and in a few minutes a /plain 
open landau, drawn by four bay horses, was seen coming slowly up the 
slope, preceded and followed by the Yeomanry. In it were the King, with 
the Duke of York on his left, and facing him Prince Charles of Denmark 
and the Duke of York's eldest son. In another four-horse carriage were 
the Queen, the Duchess of York, Prince Charles of Denmark, Princess 
Victoria, and the second son of the Duke of York. 

A few minutes sufficed to convey the royal party to Sandringham 
House, where the tenants of the estate had the honour of presenting an 
address. By the King's special command, the Yeomanry were then 
ordered to parade in front of the hall, as this was the first occasion on 
which his Majesty had had an opportunity of inspecting the r^ment, 
which had been raised by his special desire, and he could not but 
express approval of the way in which everything had been turned out at 
a few days' notice. 

His Majesty then commanded all the officers present at the escort 
to be presented to him, and at the same time invested Lieut-Colooel H. A. 
Barclay with the Victorian Order, fourth class, and expressed entire 
approval with the way in which the work had been carried out, and his 
pleasure at the great success attending the raising of the regiment 

On November 2nd, 1901, the London Gazette announced that Major 
J. R. Harvey, of the Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry, was promoted to be 
Lieut-Colonel of the 25th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa, 
for this purpose he was seconded in the regiment for service there, and 
shortly afterwards embarked for the Cape to assume his command. 

A circular was issued about this time by Colonel Barclay, the 
commanding officer, giving the details as to the advantages, pay, duties, 
and composition of the regiment Enlistment was for the regular term 
of three years, subject to the usual enforced payments for non-efficiency 
or resignation before the expiration of the period of service. Drills were 
to be held over the county at convenient places, and recruits would be 
required to attend twelve squad drills (before training if possible), while 
trained yeomen were to put in six dismounted squad drills and three 
mounted drills. For both classes the annual course of musketry (for which 
pay and expenses were to be allowed), was an essential, the recruit having 
to fire a recruit course of thirty-five rounds in addition to the trained 
yeomen's course of thirty-six rounds for efficiency. 

The annual training, or permanent duty, was to extend over fourteen 
days, at a date fixed to suit the convenience of the regiment, between 

2 A, 



370 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1901. 



May 1st and September 30th of each year. Sickness would be the only 
valid excuse for absence from the annual training. The rates of pay were 
to be five shillings per diem and one shilling and sixpence for fors^e for 
a trooper, and in addition to that five pounds was allowed for the horse 
which the man brought to the annual training; but as an addition, a sum 
not exceeding three shillings and sixpence a day could be granted for six 
months to a yeoman injured while on duty, and a sum not exceeding 
thirty pounds for loss of a horse in the actual performance of duty. The 
uniform it was stated, had been specially designed and approved by his 
Majesty the King, and the following very complete equipment was issued 
free to each man:— field service cap, serge frock, riding breeches, dress 
frock, overalls, helmet, brown jack-boots, sword, short rifle, bandolier, sword 
belt, sword knot, jack spurs, cloak and haversack. A complete set of 
saddlery, similar to that used by the regular cavalry was also provided 
for each horse. 

The uniform was blue, with yellow facings, which was construed at the 
time into a compliment to the old county regiment, the 9th East Norfolk 
Regiment of Foot 

Recruiting was very brisk at first Those members of the Norfolk 
troop of the Loyal Suffolk Hussars with less than three years' service were 
transferred to the new regiment, while those of longer service had the 
option of transferring or remaining with their present regiment. 

In November, 1901, Captain Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., loth Royal 
Hussars, was selected for the adjutancy of the corps. 

At this period the distribution of officers to the squadrons was as 
under : — 

Headquarter Staff. 

Lt-Colonel Commanding, H. A. Barclay, M.V.O., late Hampshire 
Yeomanry. 

Major (Hon. Lt-Col. Volunteers), second in command, G. F. Buxton, 
V.D., late 1st Vol. Batt Norfolk Regiment. 

Major (Hoa Lt.-Col. in Army), J. R Harvey, D.S.O.. late Sth 
Lancers and Suffolk Yeomanry, seconded for service in South Africa, to 
command 2Sth Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. 

Capt and Temporary Adjutant, Capt J. H. Patterson, 20th Battalion, I.Y. 

Surgeon Captain, J. F. Gordon-Dill, M.D., late Hampshire Yeomanry. 

Hon. Chaplain, Rev. F. A. S. ffolkes, B.A. 

Quarter-Master, H. J. Overman. 



i 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1901-2. 371 



Major 

Captain 
Lieut 

M 



•'A" Squadron. 

H.H. Prince F. Duleep Singh, M.V.O., 

late Suffolk Yeomanry. 
G. C. Buxton, (late Suffolk Yeomanry). 
Hon. C. Bateman-Hanbury. 
W. L. Buxton (Machine Gun Section), 

late 1st North Riding of Yorkshire 

Volunteer Artillery. 



Second Lieut 
It 


G. T. Bullard. 
Q. E. Gumey. 




**B" Squadron. 


Major 
Captain 
Lieut. 
Second Lieut 


A. F. Morse (late Inniskilling Dragoons). 
A. R. Buxton (late Suffolk Yeomanry). 
E. D. Spurrell 
H. G. Barclay 
J. F. Barclay 




«C" Squadron. 


Major 
Captain 
Second Lieut 


C. D. Seymour 
A CoUison 
G. H. Gumey 




"D" Squadron. 


Major 
Captain 


A. Elwes, (late Royal Navy). 

B. W. A Keppel (late Lieut 4th Batt 

Lincolnshire Reg.) 



1902. 

Another honour was conferred on the Regiment, when in the London 
Gazettiy of nth June, 1902, it was announced that H.RH. Prince Frederic 
Charles of Denmark was appointed to be Honorary Lieut-Colonel in the 
Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry (King's Own). 

The first appearance of the regiment was at their annual training in 
1902 ; and it was in a blaze of sunshine on June 3rd of that year, that 
the King's Own Regiment of Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry mustered in 
Hillington Park for the first time. A capital spot in the Park had been 
chosen as their camping-ground, within easy access of the railway station 
and village, and within sight of the Hall, the residence of Sir William 



372 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1902. 



ffolkes, BarL, by whose kind permission the regiment were able to avail 
themselves of it. 

Messrs. T. White, of Aldershot, Army Contractors, undertook most of 
the work involved in the preparation and maintenance of the camp. 

Special trains were despatched on both lines of the railway to convey 
the men and their horses to Htllington, and on arrival at the station they 
were as quickly as possible unloaded and the men sent to their respective 
squadron quarters. The four squadrons covered the whole county. "A" 
represented Norwich and district, " B " East Norfolk, with North Walsham as 
a centre, *" C " South, Mid, and North-West Norfolk, with Fakenham as its 
centre, " D " West Norfolk, with King's Lynn as its centre. Each squadron 
was grouped t<^ether, both for men's quarters and stables, and the same 
division was maintained throughout at drills, at mess, and in the tents. 

Composed as the r^ment was, mainly of recruits, and this their first 
training, it reflects the greatest credit on them for the soldier-like conduct 
they displayed and the exemplary behaviour they showed during their stay 
at Hillington Park. Part of the time was very wet, but all ranks took 
the deepest interest in their work, and great efforts were made by all to 
learn and do their duty under the most trying circumstances. Some very 
useful work was performed on Massingbam Heath and elsewhere in the 
surrounding country, and the whole raiment were very sorry when a most 
enjoyable training came to a close on June 17th, 1902. 

During this training a contingent of thirty-five men under Major C. 
D. Seymour, was sent to Aldershot, to participate in the grand Coronation 
Review there on Laflfans Plain, by his Majesty King Edward VII. 
This party was conveyed there from Hillington by a special train. On 
the first night they spent there under canvas, rain storms poured down 
with depressing frequency, turning the sandy soil of Aldershot into a 
veritable quagmire. But with the dawn a little improvement was visible, 
rejoicing the hearts of the yeomen who had given no little dme and pains 
to their task of smartening themselves and their equipment. The march 
past was at the walk, and it is only a due meed of praise to state that 
the dressing in line was admirably kept throughout. The men wore their 
full dress of blue and yellow, with khaki helmets, and presented a smart 
and soldierly appearance. The King's Own Norfolks, as a distinction 
special to themselves, carried swords in place of carbines. 

On the 9th August, 1902, a contingent of the King's Own Norfolk 
Imperial Yeomanry was sent to London to take part in the ceremony in 
connection with the coronation of their Majesties, and received from General 
Sir Ian Hamilton, the officer commanding the Yeomanry and Volunteers 
on that day, the warmest thanks for their full and punctual attendance, 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Nor/oik, 1902. 373 



and the smart and soldier-like manner in which they carried out their 
duties. For these services Coronation Medals were awarded to Lieut- 
Col. H. A. Barclay, M.V.O., and Major C. D. Seymour. 

On November 15th, of the same year, the Norfolk Yeomanry were 
called upon to provide an escort from Wolferton Station to Sandringham, 
on the occasion of the visit of his Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of 
Germany to his Majesty King Edward VII. The regiment provided for 
this escort, thirteen officers and 157 men. After the departure of H.M. 
the Emperor of Germany, the members of the escort were entertained by 
his Majesty to luncheon at Wolferton Station. During luncheon, his 
Majesty and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales honoured them by visiting them, 
and his Majesty spoke very kindly words of encouragement to all in a 
short speech, and drank to the health of the regiment 



Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry : 1902. 

Hon. Colonel. 
H.M. THE KING. 

Hon. Lt.-Colonel. 

H.R.H. Prince C. F. C. G. V. A. of Denmark, G.C.R, G.C.V.O. 

Lt.-/I;olonel. 
H. A. Barclay, M.V.O., (late Major Hampshire Yeomanry). 

Major (Second in Command). 
G. F. Buxton, V.D. (Hon. Lt-Col. Volunteers). 

Majors. 

Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, M.V.O., late Suffolk Hussars. 
J. R. Harvey, D.S.O., late Sth Lancers and Suffolk Hussars, Hon. Lt.-Col. 
in Army (Seconded for service in South Africa). 
C. D. Seymour. 

A. F. Morse, late Inniskilling Dragoons. 
A. H. Elwes, late Royal Navy. 

Captains. 
G. C. Buxton, late Suffolk Hussars, Hon. Capt in Army. 
A. R. Buxton, late Suffolk Hussars, Hon. Capt in Army. 

A. Collison. 

B. W. A Keppel, late 3rd Batt. Lincolnshire Regt 



374 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1902-3, 

Lieutenants. 

E. D. Spurrell. 
W. L. Buxtoa 
Hoa C. S. M. Bateman-Hanbury. 

Second Lieutenants. 

H. G Barclay. 
G. T. BuUard. 
Q. £. Gurney. 
J. F. Barclay. 
G. H. Gurney. 
£. A. T. Johnston. 
R. L. Charteris. 

Adjutant. 

Capt Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., lOth Hussars. 

Quarter-Master. 

H. J. Overman. 

Medical Officer. 
J. F. Gordon Dill, M.D., Sut^.-Capt. late Hampshire Yeomanry. 

Veterinary Officer. 

W. J. T. Bower. 

Hon. Chaplain. 

Rev. F. A. S. ffolkes, B.A. 



1903. 
For the year 1903 it was decided to hold the second annual training at 

Skinner^s Farm, near Cromer, on the 28th May. As before, very complete 

arrangements were made with the different railway companies to convey men, 

horses, and baggage there. 

Major E. M. Hansell, on behalf of the residents at Cromer, presented to 
the regiment a challenge cup to be given to the best all round squadron of the 
regiment, as a memento of their encampment there, May — ^June, 1903. 

The regiment was inspected by Sir William Gatacre, KC.B., and Col. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1903. 375 

O'Brien, 14th (King's) Hussars, and the latter made the following remarks in 
his report on the state of the regiment : — 

'* After a careful inspection, I am fully of opinion that the Regiment is in 
every way, with the exception of Musketry^ which I was unable to test, in a 
highly efficient condition as Yeomanry Cavalry, and in drill and manoeuvre fit 
for service in the field." 

In consequence of this excellent report the following letter was received by 
the Commanding Officer : — 

" Buckingham Palace, 

•' June 22, 1903. 
" Dear Col. Barclay, 

'' The King has read with interest and great pleasure the official 
Report on the Annual Inspection of the King's Own Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry, by Colonel O'Brien, and I write now, by command of His Majesty, 
to congratulate you and the officers, N.C. officers and men of the Regiment on 
the very high state of efficiency Colonel O'Brien, after a close inspection 
pronounces it to be in. 

*' His Majesty sincerely trusts that all Ranks will do their utmost to retain 
this high state of efficiency in the Regiment, and that the official Report after 
the Inspection of the Regiment next year may be equal to (it could not well be 
better than) Colonel O'Brien's Report of this year. 

^' With my own hearty congratulations and good wishes, 

" Believe me. Very truly, 

« D. M. PROBYN." 



The officers composing the Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry for 
1903 were as follows : — 

Hon. Colonel. 

H.M. THE KING. 

Hon. Lt.-Colonel. 

H.R.H. Prince C F. C G. V. A. of Denmark, G.C.B., G.CV.O. 

II June, 1902. 

Lt.-Colonel. 

H. A. Barclay, M.V.O. 24 May, 1901. 

Major (Second in Command.) 
G. F. Buxton, V.D. (Hon. Lt-Col. Vols.) 



376 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1903. 



Majors. 

Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, M.V.O. 3 July, 1901. 

J. R. Harvey, D.S.O. (Hon. Lt-CoL in Army) 5 July, 1901. 

C. D. Seymour 26 July, 1901. 

A. F. Morse 26 July, 1901. 

A. H. Elwes 30 Oct, 1901. 

Captaiws. 

G. C. Buxton (Hon. Capt in Army) 27 July, 1901. 

A. R. Buxton (Hon. Capt in Army) 11 July, 1901. 

A. Collison 30 Oct, 1901. 

B. W. A. Keppel 23 Jan., 1902. 

Lieutenants. 

E, D. Spurrell 26 July, 1901. 

W, L. Buxton 6 Aug., 1901. 

Hon. C S. M. Rateman-Hanbury 30 Sept., 1901. 

G. E. Hoare 8 Nov., 1902. 

G. T. Bullard 13 Dec, 1902. 

Second Lieutenants. 

Q. E Gumey 26 July, 1901. 

J. F. Barclay 19 Aug., 1901. 

G. H. Gurney 30 Sept, 1901. 

E. A. T. Johnston 12 Feb., 1902. 

R. L. Charteris 7 May, 1902. 

W. Harker 7 Feb., 1903. 

Adjutant. 

Capt Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., loth Hussars 16 Nov., 1901. 

Quarter-Master. 

H. J. Overman 11 Nov., 1901. 

MEDICAL OFFteER. 

J. F. Gordon-Dill, M.D., Surg.-Capt 25 Jan., 1902. 

Veterinary Officer. 

W. J. T. Bower 24 April, 1902. 

Hon. Chaplain. 

Rev. F. A. S. ffolkes, B.A. 4 Jan., 1902. 



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The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1904. 377 



1904. 

In the year 1904, the place of training selected for the sixteen da}rs 
training of the King's Own Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry was at Trowse, near 
Norwich. 

The camp lay about half a mile down Whitlingham Lane in a couple of 
richly turfed and wooded fields, forming part of the Crown Point estate of Mr. 
R. J. Colman. For foot drills and minor requirements, the space was ample. 
For the larger operations, Mousehold Heath lay within convenient reach. 
Some very useful work was performed at this training in outpost work, and at 
the end of the sixteen days, both officers and men learned a great deal of very 
useful work, and returned to their homes with the satisfaction of having spent 
a most enjoyable and instructive time The regiment was inspected by Col. 
W. G. Crole Wyndham. C.B.^ and Major-General A. S. Wynne, C.B., Assistant 
Adjutant-General for the Eastern District, who expressed themselves as highly 
pleased with all they had seen, and would report to the authorities 
accordingly. 

During this training the King's Own Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry took 
part in a ceremonial parade on the Cavalry Drill Ground in conjunction with 
the 3rd and 4th Battalion Norfolk Regiment. The strength of the corps taking 
part were : — 

Officers. Men. 
King's Own Imperial Yeomanry 21 349 

3rd Battalion Norfolk Regt 20 482 

4th „ „ „ • 8 . 189 



Total 49 1,020 



Colonel Custance, C.B., was in command of the force, his A.D.C. being 
Capt Bell, whikt Lt-Colonel Kerrison officiated as Brigade Major. 

Colonel Ramsay, the officer in command of the Regimental District, 
received the salute, after which he inspected the troops. The 3rd Battalion 
having trooped the colour, the troops marched past. This concluded the 
review. 

In the evening the regiment was magnificently entertained by the High 
Sheriff of Norfolk, Mr. Russell Colman, to a ball at Crown Point House. 

During this training also the regiment was presented by the citizens of 
Norwich with a silver cup to commemorate their first training at Norwich. 
The presentation was made by the Sheriff of Norwich, Colonel Leathes Prior, 
and the High Sheriff of Norfolk, Mr. Russell J. Colman. This camp was 
almost unanimously agreed to have been the most all round successful one the 



378 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1904- 



regiment bad yet experienced The site of the camp was a delightful one ; 
the general administration efficient in every detail, and the catering, notwith- 
standing the formidable proportions of the undertaking was accounted for in 
a way that won unstinted praise. The work performed was of a very useful 
nature, and the citizens of Norwich did all they could to make the stay of the 
Yeomen in their midst as pleasant as possible. 

During this training a song was composed by Mr. Harrison Hill, and 
frequently sung at the various concerts given by the raiment I have selected 
only a few verses. It was dedicated to Mr. Russell Colman, the High Sheriff 
of Norfolk, and was sung at the ball and entertainment given by him at 
Crown Point, on June 2nd, 1904. 

A it. - The Soldiers of the King." 

I. 

" There's a Regiment of which I'll sing, 
It's called the K.O.N.I.Y., boys: 
Honoar to the Country they all bring 
And this is jnst the reason why, boys. 

They're the Soldiers of the King, my boys, 
We sing, my bojrs, we singi my boys : 
And honour they all bring, my boys. 
To the K.O.N.I.Y. 

'* Piek of Norfolk Connty men are they. 
Both officers and men so true, bojrs : 
And of honoured names of rank to-dayi 
I'll give 3^a jast a few, boys. 

To Barday, Buxton, Harvey, too. 
Prince Ddeep Singh, a cheer for yon, 
Morse, Seymour, Elwes, Dawnay, too« 
True soldiers of the King. 



" Here's a verse to honour Chaplain ffolkes, 
And he's champion chaplain, too, bo3r8. 
And the merry man who makes the jokes. 
Lieutenant Bullard, tried and true, boys. 

They're the soldiers of the King, my boys,*' &c. 

On the occasion of the unveiling of the Norfolk War Memorial at 
Norwich, on October 17th, 1904, a detachment of the King's Own under the 



Thfi Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1904. 379 



command of Lieut. G. T. Bullard, took part in the ceremony. The detachment 
consisted of twenty men, of which every man was in possession of a war medal. 
After the ceremony of unveiling, the tru mpeters of the regiment were selected 
to sound the " Last Post" 

Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry : 1904. 

Hon. Colonel. 
H.M. THE KING. 

Hon. Lt.-Colonel. 

H.R.H. Prince C. F. C G. V. A. of Denmark. G.C.B., G.C.V.O. 

II June, 1902. 

Lt.-Colonel. 

Barclay, H. A., M.V.O. 24 May, 1901. 

Major (Second in Command). 
Buxton G. F., V.D. (Hon. Lt.-Col. Vols.) 9 Dec, 1901. 

Majors. 

Prince F. V. Duleep Singh, M.V.O. 3 July, 1901. 

Harvey J. R., D.S.O. (Hon. Lt-Col. in Army) 5 July, 1901. 

Seymour C. D. 26 July, 1901. 

Morse A. F. 26 July, 1901. 

Elwes A. H. 30 Oct, 1901. 

Captains. 

Buxton G. C. (Hon. Capt. in Army, 19 Aug., 1901) 27 July, 1901. 

Buxton A. R. (Hon. Capt. in Army, i Sept., 1901) 11 July, 1901. 

Collison A. 30 Oct, 1901. 

Keppel R. W. A. 23 Jan., 1902. 

Lieutenants and Second Lieutenants. 

Lieutenants. 

Buxton W. L. 6 Aug. 1901. 

Hon. C. S. M. Bateman-Hanbury 30 Sept, 1901. 

Bullard G. T. 13 Dec.,' 1902. 

Johnston E. A. T. 19 June, 1903. 

Gurncy Q. E. 30 April, 1904. 



380 The Records of the Yecmanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1 904*5. 

Second Lieutenants. 

Barclay J. F. 19 Aug., 1901. 

Guraey G. H. 30 Sept., 1901. 

Charteris R. L. 7 May, 1902. 

Marker W. 7 Feb., 1903. 

Adjutant. 

Dawnay Hon. J., D.S.O., Capt loth Hussars 16 Nov., 1901. 

Quarter Master. 

Overman H. J. 11 Nov., 1901. 

Medical Officer. 
Gordon-Dill J. F., M.D. Surg.-Col. 25 Jan., 1902. 

Veterinary Officer. 

Bower W. J. T. 24 April, 1902. 

Hon. Chaplain. 

Rev. F. A. S. flfolkes, B.A. 4 Jan. 1902. 

Uniform was blue with yellow facings and gold lace. 



1905. 

On the 6th August, 1904, Lieutenant J. F. Champion, 14th Hussars, was 
appointed adjutant to the regiment vice Captain Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., who 
joined the King's Own as a Captain, and relinquished the adjutancy. 

In the year 1905, Northrepps Hall Park, near Cromer, was selected as the 
most suitable site for the annual training. 

The regiment was inspected by General Lord Methuen, commanding the 
Eastern District, and Colonel T. O. W. Champion de Crespigny, Inspecting 
Officer of Imperial Yeomanry, who both expressed themselves as absolutely 
satisfied with the efficient state of the regiment 

On October 5th, 1905, a mounted and dismounted detachment from the 
regiment, under Lieutenant G. T. Bullard, together with the band of the 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1905. 381 



regiment was present at the ceremony of the laying of the foundation stone of 
the New Cavalry Barracks at Norwich by the Secretary of State for War, Mr. 
Arnold Foster. 

The regiment provided an escort for her Majesty the Queen and his 
Majesty the King of the Hellenes at Sandringham, on 24th November, 1905. 
Their Majesties were graciously pleased to express their pleasure at and entire 
approval of the same, and specially remarked on the turn-out and the good 
quality of the horses. 

On the accession of Prince Charles of Denmark to the Kingdom of 
Norway, the commanding officer wired the congratulations of the officers, non- 
commissioned officers and men of the regiment to his Majesty the King of 
Norway, on his entering his kingdom on the 25th November, 1905, and 
received the following reply to same : — 

" Colonel Barclay, 
•* Norwich, 

" England. 
^ I express my hearty thanks to you and the officers non- 
commissioned officers, and Troopers of ' King's Own ' Norfolk Yeomanry for 
congratulations. 

••CHARLES." 

In the London Gazette of 22nd December, 1905, there appeared the 
following memorandum : — 

" His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the 
Norfolk (King's Own) Imperial Yeomanry being in future designated 'The 
King's Own Royal Regiment, Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry.' 

'' The King has graciously pleased to confer upon the King's Own Royal 
Raiment Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry, ttie honour of becoming its Colonel-in- 
Chief. 

" Imperial Yeomanry, The King's Own Royal Regiment, Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry, His Majesty King Haakon VII. of Norway, G.C.B., G.C.V.O., from 
honorary Lieut-Colonel to be honorary Colonel, dated 23rd December." 



382 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1905. 



1905 
The King's Own Royal Regiment, Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry. 

Colonel-in-Chief. 
H.M. THE KING. 

Hon. Colonel. 

His Majesty Haakon VII., King of Norway, G.C.B., G.C.V.O. 

23 Dec., 1905. 



Colonel. 




H. A. BarcUy, CV.O. 


24 May, 1901. 


Major (Second in Command). 




G. F. Buxton, V.D. (Hon. Lt-CoL Vols.) 


9 Dec^ 1901. 


Majors. 




C D. Seymour, M.V.O. 


26 July, 1901. 


A. F. Morse, late 6th Dragoons 


26 July, 1901. 


A. H. S. Elwes 


30 Oct., 1901. 


Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O., late loth Hussars 


19 Aug., 1905. 


G. C. Buxton, Hon. Capt. in Army 


22 March, 190& 


Captains. 




Prince F. V. Duleep Singh, M.V.O. 


3 July, 1901. 


A. R. Buxton, Hon. Capt in Army 


II July, 1901. 


A. Collison 


30 Oct, 1901. 


B. W. A. Keppel 


23 Jan., 1902. 


W. L. Buxton 


22 March, 1906. 


Lieutenants and Second Lieutenants. 


Hon. C. S. M. Bateman-Hanbury 


30 Sept, 1901. 


G. T. BuUard 


13 Dec, 1902. 


E. A. T. Johnston 


19 June, 1903. 


Q. E. Gurney 


30 April, 1904. 


J. F. Barclay 


22 March, 1906. 


G. H. Gurney 


30 Sept., 190 1. 


R. L. Charteris 


7 May, 1902. 


I. Buxton 


8 Nov., 1905. 


M. E. Barclay 


22 Nov., 1905. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1905-6. 383 



Adjutant. 

J. F. Champion, Capt 14th Hussars 2 Aug., 1904. 

Quarter Master. 
H.J. Overman n Nov., 1901. 

Medical Officer. 
J. F. Gordon-Dill, M.D. 25 Jaa, 1902. 

Veterinary Officer. 

W. J. Bower 24 April, 1902. 

Hon. Chaplain. 
Rev. F. A. S. ffolkes, B.A. 4 Jan., 1902. 



Hunstanton was selected as the place of training for 1906, and on this 
occasion of the fifth annual training of the regiment the commanding officer 
the followincr telegrams : — 



sent the following telegrams : — 



" His Majesty the King, 

" Buckingham Palace, London. 
''Your Majesty's Own Royal Norfolk Yeomanry on assembling for 
Fifth Annual Training beg humbly to assure your Majesty of their gratitude, 
devotion and loyalty. 

« COLONEL BARCLAY, 

'' The Camp, Hunstanton.*' 

And the following reply was received : — 

''I am commanded by the King to thank you and to ask you to 
convey His Majesty's thanks to His Own Royal Norfolk Yeomanry for the 
loyal telegram which he has to-day received through you from the Regiment 
I am further to add His Majesty's good wishes to the Regiment, and to 
express his sincere hope that all in it will take advantage of this the Fifth 
Annual Training, to endeavour to increase, if they can, the efficiency of the 
Corps, and the good name and reputation it has already gained. 

•'DIGHTON PROBYN, 

" GcneraL" 



384 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1906. 



In reply to another which was sent to the King of Norway, the following 
was received by the commanding officer : — 

" I thank Officers, non-commissioned officers and Troopers for kind 
telegram. I still remember with pleasure the pleasant time I spent with the 
Regiment at Hillihgton, and am only sorry not to be able' to come and see you 
one day while you are at your present training. Hope you will have nice 
weather. 

"HAAKON." 

After the annual inspection by General Lord Methuen, his lordship sent 
the following letter to his Majesty the King : — 

Copy of letter from General Lord Methuen, GCB.. K.C.V.O., C.M.G. 

" Harley Street, 

" 13 June, 190& 
" My dear Sir Dighton, 

" It may please the King to know that I gave his Norfolk Yeomanry 
a stiff Inspection yesterday and that the Regiment performed the work very 
creditably. The country is far too enclosed, but an outpost line was thrown 
out of two squadrons, whilst the other two squadrons bivouacked and cooked 
food. The line was drawn in, and the bivouac troops had at a moment's notice 
to save the situation, which tested everyone's quickness and nerve. 

" It is without doubt, one of my best regiments admirably mounted, well 
commanded by a good set of Officers. 

" The officers and men are full of zeal and intelligence, and I can report 
progress since last year. 

"Yours sincerely, 

« METHUEN." 



The strength of the King's Own Royal Regiment, Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry, was as under, at the end of June, 1906. 





Officers. 


Others. 


Total 


A 


12 


100 


112 


B 


5 


93 


98 


C 


4 


92 


96 


D 


4 


95 


96 




25 


380 


40s 



LiiUT.-CoL. G. F. BUXTON, V.D. Colonel H. A. BARCLAY, C.V.O., A.D.C 

(sbcoMd m command), (commanding). 

King's Own Royal Regiment dp Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry, 
1907- 



386 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1906. 



On the occasion of the royal escort at Wolferton, 00 November 
23rd, on their Majesties King Haakon and Queen Maud of Norway 
returning to their Norfolk lesidence his Majesty King Haakon conferred 
the order of St Olaf on Major C D. Seymour. 

Also on the occasion of the royal review of the regiment by his 
Majesty King Edward VII., Colonel-in-Chief, and his Majesty King 
Haakon of Norway, Honorary Colonel, at Sandringham, on December ist, 
his Majesty King Haakon of Norway conferred the Insignia of Commander 
of the Order of St. Olaf on Colonel H. A. Barclay, M.V.O. 

The Adjutant of the regiment, Captain John Francis Champion, 14th 
King's Hussars» was also appointed a member of the Fourth Class of the 
Victorian Order, and the King was also graciously pleased to promote 
Colonel Henry Albert Barclay, M.V.O., to be a Commander in the Royal 
Victorian Order. 

At the end of December, 1906, the strength of the King's Own Royal 
Regiment (Norfolk Imperial Yeomany), by Squadrons was: — 





Officers. 


Rank and file. 


Staff 


7 


3 


A Squadron 


5 


112 


B 


S 


96 


c „ 


4 


95 


D „ 


4 


92 




25 


398 



1906. 

King's Own Royal Regiment Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry. 

Colonel-in-Chief. 

H.M. THE KING. 
Hon. Colonel. 

His Majesty Haakon VII., King of Norway, G.C.B., G.C.V.O. 

23* Dec., 1905. 

COLONEU 

H. A. Barclay, C.V.O. 24 May, 1901. 

Major (Second in Command). 
G. F. Buxton, V.D. (Hon. Lt-Col. Vols.) 9 Dec., 1901. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Caualry of Norfolk, 1906. 387 



Majors. 

C D. Seymour, M.V.O. 26 July, 1901. 

A. F. Morse (late 6th Dragoons) „ „ „ 

A. H. S. Elwes 30 Oct., 1901. 

Hon. J. Dawnay, D.S.O. (late loth Hussars) 19 Aug., 1905. 

G. C. Buxton (Hon. Capt in Army) 22 March, 1906. 

Captains. 

Prince F. V. Duleep Singh, M.V-O. 3 July, 1901. 

A. R. Buxton (Hon. Capt Army) 11 July, 1901. 

A. Collison 30 Oct, ic^i. 

B. W. A. Keppel 23 Jan., 1902. 
W. L. Buxton 22 March, 1906. 

Lieutenants and Second Lieutenants. 

Hon. C. S. M. Bateman-Hanbury 30 Sept, 1901. 

G. T. Bullard 13 Dec, 1902. 

E. A. T. Johnston 19 June, 1903. 

Q. £. Gurney 30 April, 1904. 

J. F. Barclay 22 March, 1906. 

G. H. Gurney 30 Sept., 1901. 

R. L. Charteris 7 May, 1902. 

I. Buxton 8 Nov., 1905. 

M. E. Barclay 22 Nov., 1905. 

Adjutant. 

J. F. Champion (Capt 14th Hussars) 2 Aug., 1904. 

Quarter Master. 

H. J. Overman 11 Nov., 1901. 

Medical Officer. 

J. F. Gordon-Dill, M.D. 25 Jan., 1902. 

Veterinary Officer. 

W. J. Brown 24 April, 1902. 

Hon. Chaplain. 

Rev. F. A. S. flblkes, B.A. 4 Jan., 1902. 



388 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1907. 



1907. 
The regiment assembled for its sixth annual training at Sheringbam, 
from 29th May to 13th June. On the assembling of the regiment, the 
Commanding Officer telegraphed to his Majesty the King (Colonel-in- 
Chief), and received the following reply:— 

" The King has received your telegram, and has commanded me to thank 
you and all the officers, non commissioned officers, and troopers of the 
Regiment for the kind expression of loyalty contained in it His Majesty 
congratulates you and all the Regiment having turned out so strong on this 
the sixth anniversary of its training which His Majesty sincerely hopes may be 
a successful one in every way adding if possible, to the high reputation which 
the Regiment has already gained. 

"DIGHTON PROBYN 

"(General)." 

The regiment was again inspected by General Lord Methuen, who was 
delighted with what he saw, and the great keenness and intelligence shown by 
all, and was much struck with the knowledge which all ranks had of their 
duties. This report was submitted by Lord Methuen to his Majesty the 
King. 

The strength of the King's Own Royal Regiment of Norfolk Imperial 
Yeomanry by Squadrons, to the end of October, 1907, was as under : — 





Officers. 


Rank and file: 


Staff 


7 


3 


A Squadron 


5 


"3 


B 


6 


104 


c 


4 


79 


D „ 


3 


90 




25 


389 



On the 4th November, 1907, by command of his Majesty the King 
the "King's Own" was called upon to provide an escort for their 
Majesties the King and Queen of Spain, at Wolferton, on the occasion of 
their visit to his Majesty the King at Sandringham. The following letter 
was received by Colonel H. A. Barclay afterwards. 



THE KINO'S OWN ROYAL REQIMENT 
{Norfolk Yeomanry). 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 1907. 389 



'' Sandringham, 
" Norfolk, 

** lOth November, 1907. 
''Dear Colonel Barclay, 

" I am directed by the King of Spain to convey to you his 
appreciation of and complete satisfaction with the manner in which he was 
escorted from Wolferton Station to Sandringham. 

" His Majesty was much struck by the appearance of the mea 

*'I am, 

•' Yours very truly, 

« HERSHALL." 

On this occasion the numbers that attended were eleven officers and 
121 rank and file. 

On the 9th November, 1907, his Majesty the King was graciously 
pleased to approve of Colonel H. A. Barclay, CV.O., commanding the 
regiment, being appointed aide-cU-camp to his Majesty, and to confer upon 
him the rank of Colonel in the Imperial Yeomanry. 

In announcing this honour in the regimental order book, and conferred on 
him by his Majesty, Colonel Barclay took the opportunity to thank all 
ranks for their loyalty, as he fully realised that the success and the high 
position to which the regiment had attained was entirely due to the 
splendid soldierly feeling and devotion to duty displayed by all ranks. 
He felt that this fresh honour bestowed by his Majesty was another mark 
of his Majesty's interest in and appreciation of, the efforts of every officer, 
non-commissioned officer and trooper in his regiment Colonel Barclay 
then sincerely thanked all ranks for their past hard work and devotion, 
and felt sure that he could rely on every member of the corps to back 
him up in the future and uphold the honour and proud position of the 
regiment as they had always done in the past 

1907. 

King's Own Royal Regiment Norfolk Imperial Yeomanrv; 

Uniform, Blue. 

Facings and Plume, Yellow. 

Colonel-in-Chief. 
H.M. THE KING. 

Hon. Colonel. 

His Majesty Haakon VII., King of Norway, K.G., GiC.B«, G.C.V.O, 

23 Dec, 19051 



390 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1907 



Colonel. 

Barclay H. A.. C.V.O., A.D.C. 24 May, igOL 

Major (Second in Command). 

Buxton G. F., VJO. (Hon. Lt.-Col. Vob.) 9 Dec^ 19OL 

Majors. 

Seymour C. D. 26 July, iqol 

Morse A. F. (late Lt 6th Dragoons) ,, „ „ 

Dawnay Hon. J., D.S.O. (Capt. Ret. Pay) 19 Aug., 1905. 
Buxton G. C. (Hon. Capt in Army, 19 Aug., 1901) 

22 Mar., 19061 

Captains. 

Prince F. V. Duleep Singh, M.V.O. 3 July, 1901. 
Buxton A. R. (Hon. Capt. in Army, i Sept^ 1901) 

II July, 1901. 

Keppel B. W. A. (late Lt. 4th Batt. Line. R.) 23 Jan., 1902. 

Buxton W. L. 22 Mar., 1906. 

Sloane-Stanley, C.V. (Capt. Res. of Off.) 13 Oct., 1906. 

Lieutenants. 

Hon. C. S. M. Bateman-Hanbury, 30 Sept., 1901. 

BuUard G. T. 13 Dec, 1902. 

Gurney Q. E. 30 Apr., 1904. 

Barclay J. F. 22 Mar., 1906. 

Lord A.'F. D. Hastings (Lt. Res. of Off.) i Sept, 1907. 

Second Lieutenants. 

Gurney G. H. 30 Sept., 1901. 

Charteris R. L. 7 May, 1902. 

Buxton L 8 Nov., 1905. 

Barclay M. E. 22 Nov., 1905. 

Birkbeck B. 2 April, 1907. 

Adjutant. 

Champion J. P., M.V.O. (Capt. 14 Hussars) 3 Aug., 1904. 

Quarter Master. 

Overman H: J. 11 Nov., 1901. 



Colonel H. A. BARCLAY, CA'.O., A.IXC, 

commanding 

King's Own Roval Recimknt of Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry. 



The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk, 1907-8. 391 



Medical Officer. 
Gordon Dill J. F., M.D. (Surg. Major) 14 July, 1907. 

Veterinary Officer. 
Bower W. J. T. 24 April, 1907. 

Hon. Chaplain. 

Rev. F. A. S. fTolkes, B.A. 4 Jan., 1902. 

The strength of the regiment at the end of December, 1907, was 24 officers, 
383 rank and file. 



190& 
The }rear 1908 ushered in the Reserve and Territorial Forces Act of Mr. 
Haldane, the Secretary of State for War. Under this scheme the Yeomanry 
and Volunteers underwent a complete reorganization, and the conditions of 
service were very materially altered. The Yeomanry now became the Reserve 
Cavalry of the second line of our National Defence, and in time of emergency 
were to replace the R^^lar Cavalry. I will therefore leave the Norfolk 
Yeomanry at this new phase of their history, and leave it to some abler pen 
than mine to continue their history from this date. Probably the next 
compiler of their history may be able in the future to record more glorious, but 
not more honourable feats of arms than I have been able to. 

Leaving them as I do at this point in their history, I feel certain they have 
a long and honourable career before them, especially as his Majesty King 
Edward VII. and his Majesty King Haakon VII. of Norway take such a deep 
interest in their welfare 

This book has been a labour of love to me, and I have endeavoured to 
make it as complete and interesting as possible; but my readers must 
remember, that I have had to deal with hard facts and no glorious feats of 
arms to arouse the interest and stimulate the pulse. However, the descendants 
of these men, and there are many still in Norfolk, will no doubt take a pleasure 
in seeing the names of their ancestors recorded ; and it will, I am sure, prove to 
them that even with the inevitable changes which must take place in our 
county society, the same names appear to the front, whenever the call of duty 
summons them to defend England from her enemies 



BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES. 

1794. 

Hamond Alpe, was the son of Hamond Alpe, Esq., of Little 
Fransham, High Sheriff of Norfolk. 1758. He married 1790, Lucy, daughter 
of Edward Pratt, Esq., of Ryston Hall ; secondly Harriet Frances, daughter 
of Richard Hassell, of Barnet, Herts. He was Lieut.-Colonel in the 18th Light 
Dragoons, and served in the Peninsula War, afterwards commanding the 
2nd Regiment of Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. He died at Hardingham Hall, 
August 25th, 1823, aged eighty. 

1831. 
Sir Jacob Astlev, Bart, was bom 1797. The Barony of Hastings, 
created by Edward I. in 1290, having fallen into abeyance, the House of Peers, 
by writ, summoned Sir Jacob to Parliament as Baron Hastings, May i8th, 
1841. He married 18 19, Georgina Caroline, second daughter of Sir Henry 
Watkin Dashwood, Bart. He was High Sheriff for Norfolk 1821. Sir Jacob 
died 1859, and was succeeded by his son Jacob Henry Delaval, bom 1822, who 
died 187 1. 

1838. 
Francis L'Estrange Astley was the third son of Sir Jacob Henry 
Astley, fifth Baronet. He lived at Burgh Hall, Melton Constable; married 
first, a daughter of Nathaniel Micklethwaite, of Taverham Hall, Co. Norfolk ; 
secondly, Rosalind Alicia, daughter of Sir Robert Frankland Russell, Bart- 
He was born 1810, and died 1866 at Chequers Court, Bucks. 

1798. 
Sir Edmund Bacon, the premier Baronet, of Raveningham. On 
August 30th he had a fall from his carriage, from the effects of which he 
died September 5 th, 1820, at the house of Mr. Robert Marsham, at Stratton* 
aged seventy-one. He married Anne, eldest daughter of Sir William 
Beauchamp Proctor, Bart, of Langley Park. On January 2nd, 18 12, a silver 
vase of the value of two hundred guineas was presented to him by the 
inhabitants of the Loddon and Clavering Hundred, as a token of their respect 
for him as a magistrate, and in recc^ition of his valuable services in the 
improvement of the roads in the district 



Biographical Notes. 393 



1797. 
William Becher was a farmer in West Norfolk, and the father of the 
celebrated Captain Becher, the well-known sportsman and father of steeple- 
chase riders, whose deeds in the pigskin have immortalised him in the annals 
of that sport 

1825. 
Thomas Beckham entered the army as an Ensign in the 43rd Foot in 
1 809, and served with that regiment in Spain ; was present at the battles of 
Salamanca, Vittoria, the Pyrenees and Toulouse, and having been made 
Lieutenant came home in 18 14. In the same year he went with his regiment to 
North America, and was at the seige of New Orleans. Returning to England, 
he was sent to join the Duke of Wellington's army, and was engaged in the 
advance upon and the occupation of Paris. On the withdrawal of the army 
from France in 18 18, he was placed on half-pay, and was appointed Adjutant 
of the 3rd East Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. He afterwards obtained a 
lieutenancy in the 66th Foot, and in 1833 purchased a captaincy in the ist 
West India Regiment, and was subsequently appointed Captain in the 19th 
Foot. In 1845 he was appointed Staff Officer of Pensioners at Preston. In 
1846 he was made Brevet-Major, and Lieut-Colonel in 1854, and in 1856 sold 
out of the service. He afterwards lived at Great Yarmouth. 

1862. 
Francis George Manningham Boileau. He was bom March 26th, 
1830, and was the son of Sir John Peter Boileau, F.R.S., who was created a 
Baronet in 1838, and died in 1869. Sir Francis was educated at Eton and 
Christ Church, Oxford, and was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1855. 
He took a prominent part in public life and in the administration of county 
business, and was President of the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society. 
He died at Ketteringham Park, December 2nd, 190a 

1803. 
Crisp Brown was Sheriff of Norwich 1814, Mayor of Norwich 1817. 
Was the originator of the "Norwich a Port" scheme. He died at sea, 1830, 
and his monument was formerly in St. Peter Southgate Church. His portrait 
hangs in St Andrew's Hall, Norwich. 

1797. 
William Earle Bulwer was a Captain on half-pay of the 65th 

Regiment, and when this country was threatened with invasion in 1794, he 

raised in and around Norwich, a regiment of foot called ^ The Norwich or 

io6th Regiment of Foot." He married Elizabeth, daughter and sole heiress of 



394 ^^ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk. 



Richard Warburton Lytton, of Knebworth Park. Herts. He resided at Heydon 
Hall, and eventually became a Brigadier-General with the Militia, Fencible 
Cavalry and Volunteers placed under his command ; and later on he was one 
of the five general officers under Prince William of Gloucester, to whom was 
entrusted the defence of the Kingdom. He died 1807. 

1795. 
James Burkin Burroughes, of Burlingham Hall ; married Christabel 
daughter of Henry Negus, of Hoveton; was J. P. and D.L. He died in 
Norwich, 1803, aged forty-three, and was interred with military honours at 

Burlingham. 

i8i6l 

Henry Negus Burroughes, son of James B. Burroughes, succeeded to 
the family estates at an early age, and in 18 17 served the office of Hig^ 
Sheriff ; in 1837 he was returned M.P. for East Norfolk, and represented the 
division until 1857. He died at Burlingham Hall, 1872. 

1797. 

Robert John Buxton. Bom in 1752 ; M.P. for Thetford ; created a 
Baronet, November 25th, 1800, and died 1839. He was a personal friend of 
William Pitt. His wife was Juliana Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Beevor 
Bart, of Hethel. 

1801. 

Ralph Caldwell, one of the first promoters of the Norfolk Hunt ; died 
1 83 1, aged fifty-four, and is buried at Hilborough. 

1798. 

Thomas William Coke, Earl of Leicester, was born on May 6th, 1754, 
and was returned as Member for Norfolk in 1776. With one brief intermission, 
he continued to represent the county until 1832. He was created Earl of 
Leicester in 1837. He married, in his twenty-third year, his cousin, Jane, 
youngest daughter of Mr. James Button, who died June 2nd, 1800, leaving no 
male issue. After remaining twenty-two years a widower, he married, 
February 26th, 1822, Lady Anne Amelia Keppel, third daughter of the fourth 
Earl of Albemarle, her ladyship being then nineteen and Mr. Coke seventy 
years of age. The issue of the marriage were Thomas William, born in 1822, 
and others. He died at Longford Hall, Derbyshire, on June 30th, 1842, 
aged eighty-eight 

1826. 

Edward George Cubitt, of Honing, son of Thomas Cubitt, Esq. (died 
1829), served in the Peninsula War with the 4th Dragoons, was at the 
retreat from Burgos, entered Paris with the Allied Army of occupation in 1815, 
received the medal with clasps for Vittoria, Pampeluna, and Toulouse. He 
died at Yarmouth, 1865, ^S^ seventy, and is buried at Honing. Married 
Emma, daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Lucas Cubitt 



Biographical Notes. 395 



1823. 
Edward Dewing, or Guist, was the Master of the Hounds in West 
Norfolk for many years early in the nineteenth century ; there is a portrait of 
him on horseback with hounds. He was seized with a fit of apoplexy when 
hunting with his hounds, and died 1827. 

1798. 
Anne, Lady Dacre, was the widow of Thomas Lennard Barrett, Lord 
Dacre, and daughter of Sir J. Pratt, Lord Chief Justice. She died in 1806. 
The Manor of Horsford has been in the possession of the Dacre family and 
their descendants from the early part of the fifteenth century. 

1798. 
Richard Ferrier, a member of a very old Yarmouth family. He was 

the second son of Robert Ferrier, of Hemsby, and married in 1793 Betsy 
Davy. He died in 18 14, aged fifty-three, and is buried at Hemsby, where he 
had an estate. 

1824. 

Richard Ferrier (his son), appointed Comet in the Yarmouth Troop, 
January loth, 1824, was a well-known brewer in Yarmouth, and took an 
active part in the Government enquiry in connection with the Reform Bill, and 
in promoting the Volunteer movement. His wife was Anna Maria, daughter 
of Simon Butcher. He died in 1868, aged seventy-two, and is buried at Burgh 
Castle, where he lived for some time. 

1782. 

Sir Martin B. Folkes was created a baronet 26th May, 1774. He 
married 1775, Fanny, daughter of Sir John Turner, Bart, of Warham, 
Norfolk. He died nth December, 1821. He was High Sheriff of Norfolk, 
1783, and lived at Hillington Hall. He was thirty-one years M.P. for 
Lynn, and also a Fellow of the Royal Society. 

Christopher Andrews Girling. He was the son of William Girling, 
of East Dereham, by Catherine, the daughter of Christopher Andrews, of 
Weston. He was a Major in the West Norfolk Militia, and a Deputy- 
Lieutenant for Norfolk. He married Mary, the daughter of James Barry, of 
Kingston-upon-Hull, and died at Seaming, 1820, aged sixty-six. 

1831. 

Thomas Andrews Girling, son of John Andrews Girling, 

obtained the rank of Captain in the 5th Regiment of Foot, 13th October, 
1814, and was placed on half-pay 25th February, 1816. He served in the 
Peninsula, including the retreat to Corunna, with the 5th Foot. He married 
Mary Ann, the daughter of Mr. Withers, of Holt, who died August 19th, 
1 879i %cd ninety-three. He died at the Grove, Holt, 25th March, 1S49, 
aged sixty-four. 



396 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk. 

i86a 
Francis Hay Gurney.— He was the son of Mr. Daniel Gurney, of 
North Runcton, by Lady Harriet Hay, daughter of WiUiam, sixteenth Earl 
of Erroll, and was bom 4th January, 1826. In 1847 he married Margaret 
Charlotte, daughter of Sir W. H. Browne ffolkes, Bart A partner in the 
banking firm of Messrs. Gurney & Ca, he discharged with conspicuous 
courtesy and ability all the duties that devolve upon a country gentleman. 
For many years he presided as Chairman of the Committee of Management 
of the Norfolk and Norwich Musical Festival, and in politics was a staunch 
Conservative. He died at his residence, Thickthorn, near Norwich, December 
1st, 1890^ in his sixty-fifth year. 

1797. 
Hon. Harbord. — Hon. William Assheton Harbord, second Baron 
Suffield, bom 1766 ; married Lady Caroline Hobart, daughter of Earl of 
Buckinghamshire. He died August ist, 1821. 

1794- 
Thomas Hare. — Captain Hare was created a Baronet in 181 8, original 
name, Leigh, of Stow Hall, Norfolk. Married first, Mary, daughter of Sir 
Francis Geary, Bart, and secondly, the Hon. Anne Elizabeth, daughter of 
Admiral Thomas, first Lord Graves. Died 1834, aged' eighty-five. 

18 10. 
Philip Hamond, of Westacre, was the representative of a Norfolk 
family of considerable antiquity. He died July 22nd, 1824, aged forty-two. 
Married a daughter of Charles James Pache, Esq., of Prestwold, Leicestershire, 
and is buried at Westacre. 

1797. 
John Harvey was the second son of Robert Harvey, of St Clement's, 
Norwich. He was bom on the 5th May, 1755, ^^^ married Frances, the 
eldest daughter of Sir Roger Kerrison, of Brooke, Norfolk. High Sheriflf 
of Norfolk, 1825. He was a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant of the county, 
a justice of the peace for the City of Norwich, also the '' Father of the 
City," was elected Sheriff of Norwich in 1784, and Mayor in 1792. He 
died at Thorpe Lodge, February 9th, 1842. 

1803. 
Robert John Harvey was the eldest son of John Harvey, of Thorpe 
Lodge. He was born on the 2i8t of February, 1785, and received his first 
commission in the Army as an Ensign in the 53rd Shropshire Rq^iment on the 
8th of October, 1803. This accounts for his being but one year in the 
Yeomanry. He served with great distinction in the Peninsular War, and 
afterwards became General Sir Robert John Harvey, K.C.B. He died at 



Biographical Notes. 397 

Mousehold House, on the i8th June, i860, aged seventy-five, and is buried in 
the family vault at Tharston. 

1797- 
Roger Hayes, entered the Army in 1760, and was formerly captain 
in the nth Light Dragoons, and was on duty with the Household troops 
at the coronation of George HI. He was called in Norwich the father 
of the British Army, and on January 24th, 1823, he was entertained at the 
Star Inn, Yarmouth, to celebrate the anniversary of his entrance into the 
service, sixty-two years previously. He died at Yarmouth, 1826, aged 
eighty-six. For many years he was Adjutant of the East Norfolk Yeomanry. 

1803. 
William Money Hill resided at Waterden and was an agriculturist of 
considerable repute in the breeding and selection of stock. He gained many 
prizes at the Holkham sheep shearings. He married Arabella Maria, sister of 
Major Charles Morley Balders. Mr. Hill died January 25th, 1813, aged forty- 
five. A miniature of him, in his Captain's uniform, was in the possession of his 
son, the Rev. George Frederick Hill, formerly Vicar of Repps-with-Bastwick. 

1797. 
John Holley was the son of John HoUey, of Holme-next-the-Sea, by 
his first wife, Jane, daughter of William Smith, of Lynn. He was born 1761, 
and resided at Aylsham 1792 to 1804, when he removed to Holme, where he 
lived till his death in 1813. He married first, Elizabeth, daughter of George 
Hunt Holley ; second, Mary Ann, daughter of John Sneyd, of Staffordshire ; 
and third, Sarah, daughter of the Rev. Leonard Addison, Rector of Saxthorpe. 
He was appointed Deputy- Lieutenant for Norfolk in 1798. 

1804. 
William Jary. He bought the Burlingham Estate frpm Lord Lichfield, 
and erected Burlingham House. He married in 1791, Mary, daughter of 
William Heath, and died in 1852, aged eighty- four. 

General Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., K.C.B., G.C.H.— He entered 
the Army in 1796 as Cornet in the 6th Dragoons, and received the rank 
of General in 185 1. He served at the Helder in 1799, and in 1808 took 
part in the campaign of Sir John Moore, and was present at the Battle of 
Corunna. As Colonel Kerrison, he commanded the 7th Hussars from 18 13 
to 181 5, through various campaigns. At the battle of Orthes he received 
a severe wound, and he was again wounded in the battle of Waterloo, 
where his horse was shot under him. He received his baronetcy in 1821. 
For forty years he was Member for Eye. He died at his residence. Great 
Stanhope Street, London, March 9th, 1853, aged seventy-eight 



398 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk^ 



There is a very fine full-length portrait of him, in oib, by Sir M. A. 
Shee, R.A., painted in 1818, at Brome Hall, near Eye. 

1794. 
Thomas Allday Kerrison, bom the sth of July, 1767, was the son of 

Sir Roger Kerrison, of Brooke. He was educated at Eton and served some 

time in the Army. He was SheriflTof Norwich, 1798, and Mayor of the city in 

1806. He married at Gretna Green on the i8th of May, 1797, Hannah, the 

daughter of the Rev. — Bellman, of Wetheringsett, Suffolk, and died nth of 

October, 1818, and is buried at Kirstead. 

1841. 

George Browke Leak-Knight was the eldest son of the Rev. John 
Custance Leak and Catherine Knight Graver, his wife. He was bom 1803, and 
on the death of his mother's uncle, John Browne, of Tacolnestone Hall, under his 
will he assumed the name of Knight, being that of his maternal ancestor, Richard 
Knight, High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1704. He married Maria, daughter of 
Rev. Thomas Barling, Rector of Howe. Mr. G. B. Leak-Knight lived at 
Rainthorpe Hall for some time, and finally removed to Framingham Eari 
Hall where he died in 1866. His portrait is in the possession of his grand- 
daughter, Mrs. F. O. Fisher. 

1803. 

Edmund Knowles Lacon was bom in 1780. He was presented with 
the Freedom of the Borough of Great Yarmouth in 1803; in which year 
also he was appointed Captain Commandant of the Yarmouth Troop of 
Yeomanry Cavalry. In 1804 he took his degree of M.A. at Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge. Subsequently he was for many years Major of the 
2nd or East Norfolk Regiment of Militia. He was Mayor for Yarmouth 
in 1807 ; and in 1812 was returned to Parliament for the Borough at the 
head of the poll, having for his colleague, General Loftus. He succeeded 
his father as second baronet in 1820, and served the office of High Sheriff 
of Norfolk in 1823, and died at Bath in 1839. There is a portrait of him 
at Ormesby House. He married in 1804 Eliza Dixon, eldest of the three 
daughters and co-heirs of Thomas Beecroft, Esq., of Saxthorpe HaU, in 
Norfolk. 

Charles Loftus was the third son of General William Loftus, of 
Kilbride, Co. Wicklow, Colonel of the 2nd Dragoon Guards, and Lieutenant 
of the Tower of London, by his second wife. Lady Elizabeth Townshend, 
only surviving daughter of George, first Marquis Townshend. He was bom 
at Stifflcey, Norfolk, September 21st, 1796, and entered the Royal Navy 
in 1809, at the early age of twelve. He served during the great French 
War and in the Walcheren expedition ; was afterwards present at Lord 



Biographical Notes. 399 



Cochrane's exploit of burning the French fleet in the Basque Roads ; was 
on board his ship in the Tagus in 181 1, during the Duke of Wellington's 
occupation of Portugal ; served on the American coast during the war with 
the United States, and afterwards in the Mediterranean until the peace of 
1815. In that year he had an accidental fall from the main rigging to the 
quarter-deck of his ship, which necessitated his retirement, and which after- 
wards caused occasional intervals of blindness, resulting in his total blindness 
in 1879. He so far recovered as to be able to take a commission in the 
Coldstream Guards, which, however, he was compelled to resign by increasing 
affliction. In 1835 he married a daughter of Colonel John Dixon, of 
Gledhow, Yorkshire, and settled at Dunham, Norfolk. In 1849 blindness 
compelled him to live in retirement, and he occupied his time by dictating 
recollections of his youth and after life, which were published in two 
senes:— "My Youth by Land and Sea," "My Life from 1815 to 1849." 
He died at Bournemouth, June i8th, 1883, aged eighty-six. 

1794. 
George William Manby was bom at Denver, in Norfolk, in 1765, and 

was the eldest son of Matthew Pepper Manby, Esq., of Hilgay, in the 
same county, by Mary his wife, a daughter of John Woodcock, Esq., of 
Lynn. His father, an officer in the army, served under the first Marquis 
Townshend, and was present at the taking of Quebec, in 1759. 'I*^^ ^y 
was sent to the Grammar School at Lynn, and after being some time at 
an academy at Bromley, in Middlesex, finished his education at the Royal 
Military College, at Woolwich. Disappointed at not receiving a commission 
"with suitable rank" in the army, he entered the Cambridgeshire Militia. 
He wrote several works, and was the inventor of the rocket life-saving 
apparatus, with which he was instrumental in saving over one thousand lives. 
There is a portrait of him in the Castle Museum, Norwich, in uniform. 
In 1803 he was appointed Barrack- Master at Great Yarmouth. A portrait, 
engraved by Blood, from a picture by Lane, appeared in the European 
Magazine^ in 1813. There is also a portrait of him by Sir Thomas 
Lawrence, which he bequeathed to the Town of Lynn. He died at his 
residence, Pedestal House, Southtown, Yarmouth, in 1854. His remains 
were buried at Hilgay. 

1847. 
Frank Marryat was the son of Captain Frederick Marryat, R.N., who 
lived at the Manor Cottage, Langham, near Holt, where he died August 9th, 
1848, aged fifty-six. There is a tablet in Langham Church to his memory 
and that of his two sons. Frank Marryat died July 13th, 1855, aged 
twenty-nine. 



400 Th€ Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk. 



1826. 
William Salter Millard. He was the son of the Rev. Charles 
Millardy M.A., who lived at Bracondaley Norwich. He was bom in 1783, and 
served in the Royal Navy as Midshipman on board the '' Monarch/' and was 
slightly wounded at the battle of Copenhagen in 1801. He died July 2nd, 
1862, and was buried at Catton, Norfolk. He married in 1813. Phillippa 
Frances, daughter of Robert Elwin, of Booton, Norfolk. 

1826. 

George John Milles, Fourth Baron Sondes. 

He was the second sou of Lewis Thomas Watson, second Lord Sondes, 

by Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Milles, of North Elmham, and 

succeeded to the title on the death of his brother, in 1836. He was 

educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, and entered the Royal 

Horse Guards, in which regiment he served in the Peninsula War, and was 

present at the battle of Waterloo. In 1823 he married Eleanor, fifth 

daughter of Sir Edward KnatchbuU, Bart, and in 1824, ^^ succeeding to 

the Elmham estate, assumed the name of Milles in lieu of Watson. He 

was High Sheriflf of Norfolk in 1830. After his retirement from military 

service he took great interest in agricultural pursuits, and was very 

successful in his eflforts to improve the breeds of cattle and sheep. The 

Elmham herd of red polled cattle and flock of Southdowns attained 

universal reputation. His lordship was High Steward of Great Yarmouth, 

to which office he was elected in 1854. He also was Captain in East 

Kent Regiment of Yeomanry, 1836. He died at his Norfolk seat, Elmham 

Hall, December 17th, 1874, aged eighty-one. 

1803. 

Charles Berkeley Money was formerly in the Royal Marines. He 

had retired from the Service some years on account of a severe wound received 

when captain on board the ^ Royal Sovereign " on the glorious first of June. 

He was a native and Freeman of Norwich. He died at Bideford, Devonshire, 

November 13th, 1821, aged sixty-three. 

1794- 
General John Money, Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of Norfolk 
Yeomanry Cavalry. Died at Trowse Old Hall, aged seventy-seven. He 
entered the army as a volunteer in Elliott's Light Dragoons in the Seven 
Years' German War, and was with them at the battle of Tillinghausen. 
He was afterwards a Captain in the 9th (East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot, 
and in the American War was Deputy-Assistant-Quartei-Master-Greneral to 
the army commanded by General Burgoyne. He was the author of several 
pamphlets on military and other subjects. About forty years before his 
death he built the mansion known as Crown Point, where for more than 
thirty years he gave an annual bail 



Biof^aphual Notes. 401 



1794. 
James Murray, was formerly a Captain in the 9th or East Norfolk 

Regiment of Foot, to which he was appointed as Ensign in 1772. Went on 

half- pay about 1790. He served with distinction through the whole of the 

American War. He died at his house in St Peter's Mancroft, 18 18, aged 

seventy-two. 

1798. 

Thomas Nelson was the son of Edmund Nelson, of East Dereham and 

Hunstanton (who died in 1790, and is buried at Dereham), by Anne, the 

daughter of Matthew Halcott, of Hoe Hall. Thomas Nelson died 1805, ^g^^ 

fifty-three. 

1799- 
William Palgrave was the eldest son of William Palgrave, of Coltishall, 

and Elizabeth (Thirkettle) his wife. He was born on the loth of September, 
1 77 1. When the troop of Yarmouth Gentlemen of Yeomanry was formed at 
Yarmouth, he was commissioned by the Duke of Portland on the 20th June, 
1798, and his portrait in the gay uniform of his corps was in 1879 in the 
possession of his eldest surviving son, Thomas Palgrave, Esq., of Bryn-y-gynog, 
Llansaintffraid, near Conway, North Wales, a Justice of the Peace for the 
County of Denbigh. He is represented in the portrait as wearing the large 
white cravat then recently introduced by George, Prince of Wales. He married 
on the 1 8th October, 1798, at St. Paul's, Covent Garden, Elizabeth, only 
daughter of Samuel Barker, Esq., of Great Yarmouth. He was Collector of 
Customs at the Port of Great Yarmouth. In 18 14 he was elected Mayor of the 
Borough. In 1826, Mr. Palgrave was promoted to the CoUectorship at Dublin, 
where he died on the nth of January, 1838, being then in his sixty-eighth 
year. 

1782. 
George, First Marquess Townshend— The Honourable George 
Townshend was born on February 28th, 1724. He was the eldest son of 
Charles, third Viscount Townshend, and his wife, Audrey Harrison, daughter 
and heiress of Edward Harrison, of Balls Park, Hertford. He was a Field- 
Marshal in the Army, Colonel of the 2nd Regiment of Dragoon Guards, 
Governor of Jersey and Lord-Lieutenant of the County of Norfollc In 1783 
he was appointed Master-General of the Ordnance, and on October 31st, 1786, 
he was raised two steps in the Peerage, and became the Marquess Townshend 
of Raynham, in the county of Norfolk. He was a godson of George I., served 
under George 1 1, at the battle of Dettingen, and attended the person of William 
Duke of Cumberland at the battles of Fontenoy, CuUoden and Lafeldt He 
was second in command at the memorable siege of Quebec, under General 
Wolfe, and was consequently the immediate successor of that renowned chief 

20 



402 The Records of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Norfolk. 



in Canada. He also served a campaign in Portugal, and commanded the 
British forces sent to the assistance of that country against Spain. He was 
appointed Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland in 1767, and continued in that high office 
to the great satisfaction of the Irish people till 1772. He married first in 
December, 175 1, the Baroness Ferrars of Chartley, who died in 1770. His 
lordship's second marriage was in 1773, with Anne, daughter of Sir W. 
Montgomery ; he had issue by both his marriages. In his private character he 
was lively, unaffected, and convivial. He possessed an acute mind and 
enlivened his conversation with that original pleasantry which is shown very 
visibly in the works of his pencil when he chose to display it In the earlier 
part of his life he frequently indulged in its humours, and was an admirable 
caricaturist even at the time when Hogarth flourished. No one enjoyed life 
more than the Marquess Townshend. He suffered indeed some heavy 
afflictions, but he bore them with resignation, and closed a life protracted 
beyond the common date of man, with the general respect and estimation of 
his country. He died in 1807. 

1804. 
Charles Tompson was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1827, he married 
Juh'ana, second daughter of Thomas Kett, of Seething Hall. He lived at 
Witchingham Hall, and one of his daughters married Sir John Henry Thomas 
Manners Sutton, third Viscount Canterbury and Baron Bottesford. 

1822. 
Thomas Tuck was son of John Tuck, of Witton, by Susanna Gilbert, 
his wife. He was born in 1768. Lord of the Manor of Brundall, and lived at 
Strumpshaw Hall. Married 1798, Mary, daughter of Thomas Saul. Died 
October 9th, 1834, at Strumpshaw Hall. 



Index to Persons. 



Note. — The same name may occur more than once on a page ^ but it is only indicated 
once in this index. 

The names of persons incidentally mentioned in the Biographical Notes are not indexed 
but the persons of whom notices are given are included in this index. 



Abadie, General, 346 
Abell, A., 150 
Abel, John, 149 
Abercromby, Sir R., 109 
Adair, Robert, 127 

„ William, 127 
Albemarle, Earl of, 193, 

, 355 
Albert, H.R.H. Prmce, 

287, 289, 291 

AldersoD, Dr., 197 

., Mr. Justice, 247 
„ Mr. Steward , 209 

Aldiss, H. R., 341, 361 

Alexander, Robert, 38, 69, 
70, 82, 104, 105 

Allen, H. J., 341 
„ N., 340 

Alpe, Hamond, 64, 74, 87, 
loi, 107, III, 115, 127, 
130, 145, 150, 152, 162, 
172, 177, 178,204,207, 

a 1 5, 392 
Amherst, Hon. Florence, 

344 
Amherst, Ldrd, 45, 47, 366 

Andr6ossy, General, iiS 

Andrews, H. G., 339 

Angelo (fencing master), 71 

Annesley, Captain and 

Mrs., 281 

Anthony, John, 57, 60 

Archdale, Captain, 345 

Archer, Colonel, 98 

Arkwright, Mrs. C., 315 

Armes, R., 339, 355 

Arminger, John, 57, 61, 62 

Armstrong, W. M., 167 

Ash, Rev. C, 288 

Astley, Sir Edward, 23, 24, 

38,5a 
„ Frances L'E., 258, 

259. 314. 392 



>} 



ff 



Astley, Hon. H. J., 332 

Jacob Henry (Sir), 

38, 69. 70, 82, 97, 104 

Jacob (Sir), 247, 

248.250,251,252,253, 

a55, 256, 257» 258, 259, 

39a 

Mr., 301 

Mr. and Mrs. Miles, 

a73 
Atkins, W., 339 

Atkinson, William, 149 

Avila, A., 340, 361 

Ayton Arms, 151 

John, 211, 268 






» 



,» 






Babington, Colonel, 332 
Bacon, E., 106 

Sir Edmund, 48, 
96, loi, 108, 112, 127, 

150, 39a 

Lady, 96 

Major, 158 

R. N., 318 
BA§gc» Mrs., 66 
Bagot, Hon. W. L., 335 
Bagshaw, G. R., 385 
Bailey, George, 171, 180 

„ John. 236 
Baird, E. W. D., 333, 337, 

34at 36a 
Baker, George, 149, 175 
Robert B., 77 

R.J.. 341 

„ Colonel, 308 
Ballam, J., 339 
Banks, John, 258, 259, 263, 
265, 266, 274, 276, 279, 
282, 285, 288, 290, 291, 
293, 296, 299, 301, 304 
Barber, Benjamm, 149 
George, 95 
Robert, 42 



t, 



}* 






Barclay, H. A., 16, 365, 

366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 

373, 375. 379, 381, 38a, 
383.385.386.388,389, 

390 
Barclay, Humphrey G., 

367, 368, 371. 374 
Barclay, Joseph F., 367, 

371,374.376,380,382, 

387, 390 
Barclay, M. E., 3821 387, 

390 
Barker, Rev. B., 198, 199, 

201 

Barling, Rev., 281 

Barnard, G., 236 

.» J«. 40 

„ Robert, 148, 164. 
Barnes, James, 57, 61, 62 

„ Samuel, 216, 220, 

224 
Barnston, Jacob, 57, 61, 62 

„ John, 57, 6i, 62, 

147 
Barrett, Robert, 83 

Barsham, John, 207, 218, 
222, 225, 230, 239 

Bateman, Lady, 15, 267 

Bateman-H anbury, Hon. 
C. M.S., 367, 371,374, 
376, 379, 382, 387, 390 

Baxter, Thomas, 81 

Bayning, Lord, 268 

Beach, Thomas de la-, 38 

Beales, Francis, 219,223 

Beamon, John, 81 

Beare, S. S., 318 

Beauchamp, George, 53, 
57, 62, 65, 74, 87, 89, 
loi, 108, 112, 130, 133 
147, 161 

Beauchamp, Sir Thomas, 
48 



404 



Index. 



Becher, William, 87, loi, 

108, 112,147, 161, 170, 

171, 177, 393 
Beclc, A. £. A^ 340, 361 
„ G. W., 340, 361 
„ Mr. and Mn., 363 
„ S., 340, 361 
Beclcett, Col. £. W., 334 

„ John, 151 
Beckham, John, 150 

„ Thomas, 2a6, 

231, 240, 393 
Beckwith, A. A. H., 209 
Beevor, M., 210 

„ Thomas, Esq., 127 

„ Sir Thomas, 127 
Belgrave, Ladv, 52 

„ Lord, 52 
Bell, Captain, 377 
Bellairs, Captain, 317 
Beloe, Mr. A., 229, 230 
Bennet, Philip, 326 
Bennett, Sheriff, 234, 235 
Bemey, Mr., Mrs., and 

Misses, 273 
Betson, David, 163, 173 
Betts, J., 318 
Bidwefl, Mr., 288 
Bignold, Mr., 273 

„ Sir S., 318 
Billing, John, 207, 318, 222, 

• 225,230,239 
Billing, Robert, 57, 60 
Bingham, Captain, R. N., 

301 
Bingham Lieut.-Col., 265 
Bingham, Thomas, 313 
Birch, Mr., 273 
Bird, — Jan., 42 

« J.. 81 
„ John, 162, 171 
Birkbeck, B., 390 
„ Sir E.. 346 
W., 318 
Bishop, P. C, 341 
Black, Col., 321, 322 
Blacquiere, Lady de, 125 
Blade, Christopher, 150 
Blair, Colonel, 352 
Blanchflower, Francis, 57, 

61 
Blake, Thomas, 127 
„ W. Jex, 288, 290, 

393» «97 
Blazey, James, 236 

Blencowes, Henry, 107, 

III, 150 

Blofield, Thomas, 83, 127 

„ Thomas C, 83 

Blomfield, Colonel, 289 



Blomfield, Major, 273 
Bloom, Daniel, 163, 173, 

178 
Bloom, James G., 83, loi, 

108, III 
Blyth, B., 147 

Barnard B., 57, 61 

R., 236 

W. A., 340. 361 
Boardman, E., 363 
Boileao, F. G. M., 315, 



It 
It 
«« 



3a3. 395 
Id, S< 



Bond, Sergeant John, 128, 

129, 147, 214, 251 
Bone, Giles, 41 
Booth, Alderman, 209 
Bostock, A. J., 340 
Botham, Mr., 48 
Bowater Sir Edward, 251 
Bower, W. J. T., 374, 376, 

380. 383. 391 
Boyd, Mrs., 297 

„ Thomas, 276, 277, 

282, 283. 285, 288, 290, 
293, 296, 299, 301, 304, 

305 
Brabant, Colonel, 352 

Brabazon, General, 352 

Brandford, Mr., 151 

Brereton, John, 263, 265, 

266, 272, 273, 274, 276, 

279, 282, 283, 285, 288, 

290, 293 
Brereton, W. J., 256, 257, 

«58. 259, 263, 265 
Brett (Breet), Abel, 57, 61, 

62 
Brett, John, 60 
Mr., 26, 61 
John, 307, 308, 309, 

310, 315, 316, 318 
Brett, Mrs., 315 
Brettingham, T. C, 268 
Brierley, Daniel, 81 
Brightman, Robert, 151 
Brightwell, T., 318 
Brinkman, Colonel, 354 
Bristol, Marquess of, 361 
Broadwood, General, 356 
Brookfield, Colonel, 353 
Brown, Captain, 321, 322 
„ Crisp, 148, 157, 158, 

163, 164, 173, 178, 230, 

393 
Brown, Daniel, 171, 180 

E. R., 339 

F., 318 

John, 276, 279, 282, 

283, 285 

Brown, Samuel, 173, 179 



t* 



tf 
It 
II 



Brown, W. J., 387 
Browne, Harry, 268 
„ John, 77 
„ Rev. Reppes,23 
„ Thos. H., 220, 224, 
227, 231, 240 
Browne, W. J. U., 318 
Browning, Captain, 37 
Brunton, Lieat.-Col., 284 
Bryant, James, 82, 105 

„ John, 82, 105 
Buck, James, 57, 60 
„ William, 57, 61 
It II jun., 60 

Buckworth, T. J. R., 274, 
276, 282, 283, 285, 288, 
289, 290, 295, 296, 299, 
300, 301, 302, 304, 305 
Buckworth, Mr. and Mrs., 

273 
Bollard, G. T., 366, 367, 

37 1 1 374. 37^1 379t 380, 

3821 3871 390 
Bullard, Sir H., 345, 362 

BuUimore and Hawldns, 

Messrs., 229 

Bullock, Rev. Colby, 127 

Thomas, 148, 162, 



It 



It 



It 



, 171. 177 
Bulman, W. E., 341 

Bulwer, Mr. Lytton, 273 

„ William Earie, 

83. 87, 89, 100, 107, 

109, III, 115. 127, 130, 

134. 136, I45i »50i 162, 
163, 172, 174, 177, 178, 

393 
Bunfeliow, Robert, 150, 175 

Bunn, Anthony Abel, 41 

George, 41 

Owen, 236 

Burch, Richard, 219, 223 

Burcham, John, 148, 204, 

208 

Burgoyne, General, 174 

Burrougbes, £., 236, 237 

„ H. N., 204, 

208, 216, 220, 224, 226, 

23I1240. 394 
Burrougbes, Jas. B., 74,86, 

100, 107, III, 115, 127, 

1301 131 1 i45i I49i 394 
Burrougbes, Mrs., 66 

Rev. R., 318 

Randall, 127 

„ Thomas D'E., 

231, 240 

Burt, W., 192 

Burton, Henry, 205, 208, 

216 



It 



II 



«l 



Index. 



405 



Burton, J., 81 

„ Rev. William, 94, 

95.96 
Butterworth, J., 81 

Buxton, A. R., 332, 333, 

337. 342, 371. 373. 376, 
379, 382, 387, 390 
Buxton, G. C, 332, 333, 

337, 338, 340, 342. 345. 
346, 353. 355. 359. 360, 
361, 362, 366, 367, 368, 

371. 373. 376. 379. 382, 

387. 390 
Buxton, G. F., 366, 370, 

373, 375. 379. 382, 386, 
390 
Buxton, Geoffrey, 16 
„ Mrs. Geoffrey,344, 

347.363 , _ _ ^ 
Buxton, Colonel G. F. C, 

362 

Buxton, I., 382, 387, 390 

John, 150 

J. H., 366 

Mr., 39 

R. J.. 394 
Redmond, 367 

Robert John, 63, 

83 

S. G., 366 

Sir T. F., 366 

Walter L., 367, 

371. 374. 376, 379. 38«, 
387. 390 

Caldwell, Capt. and Mrs., 
273, 281 

Caldwell, H. B., 253, 255, 
256,257,258,259,202, 
263,265,266,271,274, 
275. 276, 279, 280, 282, 
283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 
288, 290, 291, 293 

Caldwell, Ralph, 148, 204, 
207, 218, 222, 394 

Caley, E. J., 345 

Campbell, Capt., 209 
„ Lt.-CoL, 275 

Cann, John, 176 

Calver, H., 341, 361 
„ Mr., 211, 247 

Carman, C, J., 340, 361 

Carpenter, William, 65, 87, 
loi, 106, 108, 112, 150, 

163, 173. 175, 179 
Carrington's Brigade, 356 
Carter, Henry, 215, 220 
Carwardine, F. H., 341 
Case, Edward, 218, 22s 
„ Mr., 61, 253, 262 






Case, Thomas, 57, 60 
„ Thomas H., 126 
Cater, Mrs., 315 
Catton, Thomas, 150 
„ William, 150, 172, 
178 
Chalker, Charles, 220 
Chambers, C, 341, 361 
„ John, 39, 69 

„ Mr., 182 

Chamberlain, Thomas, 148 
Chamberlin, Alex., 313 
„ F.G.,340,361 

„ Mr. and Mrs. 

G., 347 
Chamberlin, Lieut., 317 
„ Mrs., 363 

„ Robert, 309, 

318 
Chamberlin, Mrs. R., 315 

„ Sergt., 315 

„ Thomas, 77 

Champion, J. F., 380, 383, 
386, 387, 390 

Chandler, Jeff. K., 82, 105 

Chapling, John, 149 

Charles X., 246 

Charteris, R. L., 374, 376, 
380, 38a, 387, 390 

Chatham, Lord, 17, 170 

Chauvelin, Mons., 34 

Chesham, Lord, 334, 354, 

357. 358, 359. 363. 367 
Chester, Earl of, 124, 140 

Chatterton, Lt.-CoL, 274 

Chevallier, Rev. Dr., 268 

Christmas, Christopher, 39 

F. 341 

Christy, J., 341 

Church, H. A., 341 

Churchill, William, 39, 82, 

105 

Churton & Clarke, Messrs., 

266 

Chute, Mr. (M.P.), 273 

Clabbum, J. W., 345 

Clark, Robert, 42 

Clarke, Sir Charles and 

Lady, 273 

Clarke, Charles, 83 

Henry, 337 

John, 277, 297 

Lt.-CoL, 286, 287 

„ T., 148, 164 

„ William, 216, 220, 

224, 227, 340 

Clarkson, C, 341 

Clover, Joseph, 77 

Coats, Danderson, 83 

Cock, Joseph, 148 



,» 



,. 



,. 



Cockburn, Ensign, 317 
„ CoL, 317, 318, 

3«i. 322 

„ Mrs., 315 
Coe, John, 81 
Colman, Edward, 148, 164, 

173. 175. 179 

Coke, I'homas William, 24, 

40,67,91,92,93,96,97, 
loi, 108, III, 151, 161, 
170, 171, 177, 192, 193, 
394 ( see alio Leicester^ 
Earloj) 

Coke, Mrs., 96 
„ Hon. Wenman, 318 

Coldham, James, 41, 47, 48, 
100, 107,111 

Coldwell, Mr. R., 186, 207 

Cole, Robert, 46, 49, 50, 51, 
57. 59. 60, 6i 

Coleman, Sergt., 315 

Colhoun, Robert, loi, 107, 
112 

Colhoun, William 101,108, 
112 

Collinson, J., 81 

Collison, A., 367, 368, 371, 

^ ,373.376,379.382,387 
Collison, Rev. H., 288 

Colls, W. L., 341, 361 

CoUyer, Mr., 67 

Colman, Russell J., 366, 

^ , 377. 378 
Colvm, — ,41 

R. B., 333, 337, 

342 

Coman, John, 148 

Compton, Rev. J., 318 

Conway, General, 24 

Conv, Thomas, 57, 60 

Cook, H., 339 

„ Thomas, 41, 150 

Cooper, A., 333, 337 

„ Emmanuel, 323 

„ John, 41, 57, 81 

„ Mr., 323 

„ Robert, 149 

„ Rev. S. L., 96, 164, 

174, 176, 179 
Cooper, Surgeon, 315 

„ Thomas H., 127 
Coote, Sir Eyx^y 21 
Coote, Thomas, 148 
Copeman, Dr., 318 
Corey, — , jun., 42 
„ James, 69 
Cornish, Robert, 57, 61 
„ Robinson, 62 
Comwallis, — , 63 
Corry, Donald, 282 



J 



4o6 



Index. 



Cottis, C. Jm 341 
Cotton, Robert, 180 
Crabb, John, 150 
Crabtree, Captain, 241, 

a4a. a43 
Crafer, Thomas, 149, 219 

Craig, General Sir James, 

127. 133 
Crawley, H. E., 333, 337, 

338, 340, 342, 345i 346, 

353 , , 

Crawshay, Mrs. and the 

Misses, 273 
Creasy, John, 100, 107, 

111,220,224,227,231, 

240 
Cressall, George, 82, 105 
Crisp, Capt., 115, 130, 154 
Crisp, John, 149, 162, 172, 

178, 182 
Crisp, John, jun., 172, 178 
„ Captain John, 151 
„ Wuliam, 161, 171, 

180 
Croker, Captain, 315 
Cromwell, Oliver, 124 
Cross, C, 339 
Crossley, Lieut., 212 
Crow, Henry, 171, 180 
Crowe, Rev. Henry, 96 

„ James, 127 
Crozeir, H, 341 
Cruickshank, F. H. G., 

333. 336, 337. 343. 344. 

345 
Cubitt, Bertram, 16 

„ Captain, 317 

„ Charles, 221, 224, 

227, 232, 240 
Cubitt, Edward, 231, 240 
„ E. G., 394 
„ George, 74, 83, 87, 

loi, 108, 112, 127, 148 
Cubitt, Thomas, 74, 87, 

loi, 108, 112, 127,146, 

148, 164 
Cubitt, W. J., 323 
Cumberland, H.R.H., 

Duke of, 139 
Cunnell, C, 362 
Cunningham, Admiral Sir 

C, 268 
Cunningham, Colonel, 99 
Currie, Bertram W., 296, 

299, 302, 304 
Curtis, A. L., 341 
Custance, Mr. H., 273 

„ Lieut. -Col 314, 

377^ 
Cox and Greenwood, 39, 

82 



Cos, T., 148, 164 
Cox, William, 171, 180 
Cozens-Hardy, Mr. and 
Mrs., 363 

Dacres, Right Hon. Lady, 

94. 95. 96. 395 
Dade, Hugh, 57, 61 

Dallaston, Richard, 62 

Dalrymple, A., 323 

Daly, Lieut.-Col., 291 

Dalzell, Colonel, 353 

Daniel, Gilbert, 57, 61 

Daniels, Richard, 100, X07, 

III 
Darell, John, 148, 164, 165, 

173, 176, 179, 181, 182, 

186, 187, 204, 208, 216, 

220, 224, 227 
Dash wood. Rev. James, 40, 

53 
Davison (Davidson), Alex- 
ander, 39, 82, 104 
Davey, Mr., 262 
Davis, — , 42 
Davy, Jonathan, 150 
Dawnay, Hon. J., 370, 374, 
376, 380, 382, 387, 390 
Deare, Major, 221 
de Beer, ToUie, 358 
de Crespigny, T. O. W. C, 

380 
Deering, Colonel, 69 
De Freville, Captain, 354 
De Grey, Hon. Mr., 273 
de la Beach, Thomas, 38 
de la Rey, 356, 358 
De Wet, 355, 356 
Denison, Rev. Mr., 66 
Denmark, Prince Charles 
of (see also Norway, 
A"i/i^^, 369,371,373, 

375, 379, 381 
Denmark, Queen of, 322 

Denny, Lieutenant, 194 

.. R. H., 337 
Dering, John T., 74, 86, 

100, 107, III, 199, 200 
Dewing, Edward, 215, 218, 

222, 225, 230, 239, 395 
Dichings, 25, 26 
Dickens, Mark Hildersley, 

83, 127 
Digby, L., 341 
Digings, Thomas, 57, 61 
Diggens, — , 262, 264 
Diggings, Jennis, 207, 218, 

222, 225, 230, 239, 274 
Dill, J. F. Gordon, 370, 374, 

376, 380, 383, 387, 391 



Dillingham, B. Gordon, 40, 

48, 63, 64, 74, 87 
Dixon, Colonel, 273 
Dodman, Martin, 42 
Doughty, William, 57, 61 
Douglas, Captain, 317 
„ General, 357,358, 
360 
Drake, James, 268 

„ J^^Q. 208 

„ Thomas, 204, 205, 
208, 216, 220, 224 
Drake, Rev. W. F., 194 
Drosier, Edward, 57, 60, 

H7 
Drosier, Robert, 57, 61 

„ Mr., 61 

„ Mrs., 288 
Druery, Geoiige, 57, 61 
Duckett, Canon, 363 

„ W. S., 341, 361 
Duggan, Augustus, 38, 82, 

104 
Duncan, Admiral, 85 
Dundas, Sir D., 165, 168 
„ Right Hon. H., 

88, 95 
Dunmore, Tom, 362 
Dunn, John, 214 
Dunning, — , 29 
Dunnington, William, 77 
Dunthorne, Private, 301 
Durrant, Sir H. and Lady, 

281, 288 
Dyball, Thomas, 148 

Eade, Sir Peter, 362 
" Earle, C, 342 

„ Sergt.- Major, 336 
Edgar, Lt.-CoL, 241, 242, 

243, 244, 245 
Edinburgh, H.R.H. Duke 

of, 322 
Edward VIL, H.M. King, 
365. 368, 372, 373, 375. 

381, 382, 384, 385. 386, 
388, 389, 391 

Edwards, H., 288 

„ Mrs. and Miss, 

273 
Egremont, Lord, 93 

Ellery, Sergt.- Major, 336 

Elliot, General, 24 

Elwes, A. H., 366, 367, 

368,371.373.376,379. 

382, 385, 387 

England, Sharpe, 41 
Ensor, John, 248 
ErroU, General the Earl 
of, 357. 358 



Index. 



407 



*t 



f> 



Etchels [or Elches], John, 

161, 171, 180 
Etheridge, Gwjmne, 161, 

171, 177 
Evans, Mr. Chancellor, 318 
Sir Francis, 351 
Thomas Brown, 

127, 2IO 

Everard, Major, 67 
Eyre, Edward V., 172, 178 
Eyton, Lieut., R.N.. 281 

Fairlie, F., 341 
Farquhar, Lord, 366 
Farrer, — , 42 
Ferrand, Mr. and Mrs., 

Ferrier, Richard (sen. 
and jun.), loi, 108, 
112, 151, 164,221,224, 
227, 232, 240, 395 

Field, Capt., 315 
„ Henry, 150 

Filby, J., 149 

Finch, W., 340 

Fisk, Mr., 211 

Fitzgerald, Lord Edward, 
88 

Fitzgerald, Mr., 298 

Fitzroy, Major-General 
Lord Charles, 104 

Fitzroy, Colonel, 301, 318 
„ Captain and Mrs., 

273 
Flavell, Mr., 264 

Flower, Sir J. and Lady, 

, 373 
Flowerdew, A. B., 339 

„ E. F., 339 

„ Private, 355 

Folkes, — , 63 

„ Lady, 21, 27, 28, 
29, 46, 48 
Folkes (fiblkes). Sir Martin 
B., 17, 25, 32, 43, 44» 
45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 52, 
54. 57» 58» 6o» 61, 62, 

65f 74. 87* 89. loi. io8» 
112, 130, 133,147,161, 

170, 171, 177, 395 

Folkes, Martin B. (d. 1798), 

4I1 74. 87. loi. 108, 
112 
fiblkes, Rev. F. A. S., 370, 

374. 376. 380. 383. 387. 

391 
fiblkes, Sir William, 15, 20, 

40. 368, 372 
Foster Rev. Samuel, 148, 

164, 173. 17s. 179 



Foster, Arnold, 381 
„ Captain, 315 
„ Thomas, 180 
„ Sir W., 318, 319 

Foulsham, W. 236 

Fountaine, Mr. and Mrs. 

273 
Fowell, Edward, 204, 207 

Fowle, Matthew, 57, 60 

Foxhall, William, 150 

Francis, Alderman, 209, 

«33. 235 
Francis, Richard, 100, 107, 

III 

Francis, W., 340 

Frankland, — ,31 

Francklyn, Henry, 100, 
107, III 

Eraser, R. G., 341 

Freeman, Mr., 257 

„ William, 280, 
284, 286, 288, 290, 292, 
293,294,296,299,301, 
302, 304 

French, General, 360 
„ Thomas, 268 

Frere, Temple, 259, 268 

Frewer, J. N., 77, 83 

Frost, H. C, 41, 57 

Fyers, Capt., 131, 158, 160 

Gale, Sergeant, 315 
Gamble, Robert, 268 
Gardiner, John, 149 
„ T. H., 339 
Garrett, William, 57, 60 
Garth, General, 80, 94 
Gatacre, General Sir Wm., 

362, 374 
Gates, G. C, 339 
Gattey, David, 148 
Gay, Benjamin, 236 
„ John, 83, 127 
„ Mr., 301 
„ Richard, 57, 61 
Gazalee, Mr. Justice, 232 
Gaze, J., 81 
„ Thomas James, 82, 
104 
Geary, Mr., 273 
Gee, Mr., 344 
George, H.R.H. Prince of 

Wales, 91, 92, 93 
Germany, H.LM. The 

Emperor of, 373 
Gibbon, Edmund, 124 
Gibbons, John, 81 
Gibbs, John, 57, 60 

„ Lord Chief Justice, 
200 



Gibson, Thomas, 81 
Giles, Sergt.- Major, 336, 

362 
Gill, Mr., 43, 50, 54 
Gilman, Edward C., 172, 

178, 204, 207 
Gilman, Mr., 201 
Girling, B., 288 

„ Christopher, 65, 

395 
Girling, John, 150, 247 

„ John A., 162, 171 

„ Mr. and Mrs., 273 

„ Richard, 57, 61 

„ T. A., 256, 257, 

258, 259, 263, 264, 265, 

266, 271, 272, 274, 275, 

276, 277,279,289,291, 

295.296,297,299,301, 

304, 395 

Girling, Rev. W., 288, 295 

Gittey, William, 150 

Glasspoole, Thomas, 202, 

205 

Glover, Philip, jun., 41 

Godfrey, William, 57, 61, 

Goldfinch, G. N., 341 
Gooch, John W., 194, 204, 

208, 216, 220, 224, 227, 

231, 240 
Gooch, Rev. John, 127 
Good, Corporal, 295 

„ Henry, 150 
Gooding, Robert, 236 
Goodw5m, William, 57, 60, 

147 
Goodwyn, Thomas, 57, 62 

Gordon, Thomas WilUam, 

132. 136 
Gordon- Dill, J. F., 370, 

374. 376, 380, 383, 387, 

391 
Goring, William, 150 

Gower, Lord, 29 

Growing, Lionel, 220, 225 

Grainger, Thomas C, 82, 
105 

Graver, G. C, 57, 60 
„ G. D., 57, 61 

Green, G., 362 

„ J. P., 340, 361 
„ James, 221, 224, 
227, 232, 240 

Green, John, 57, 60 
„ S. v., 341 
„ T. W., 341, 361 
„ W. P., 339, 361 
„ William, ^p, 31 
„ William, jtin., 57, 61 



4o8 



Index. 



Greene, Sir £. W., 361, 

Greene, Lady, 344 

„ W. R., 333, 337, 

338. 339. 34a» 344. 346. 

353. 355» 358. 362 
GreengrasSv George, 61 

„ Robert, 57 

Greenwell, B. £., 350 
Grey, Earl, 246 
„ Sir George, 30a, 305 
„ Colonel R., 358, 360 
Griffiths, T. W. J., 82, 104 
Grigsoo, £. Harvey, 137 
Grimmer, Comet, 315 

„ Fred, 309, 310, 

3«3 
Grimmer, Mrs. F., 3x5 

Grimwade, A. C, 340, 361 

Grymes, Charles, 149 

Guinness, the Hon. W. E., 

333. 337. 342. 362 
Gunthorpe, Matthew, ao8, 

ai6, 221, 224, 227, 232, 

240 

Gunton, Andrew, 31 

Geoige, 57, 61 

George, jun., 61 

Mark, 57, 61, 62 

Gordon, Mr. and Mrs., 273 



.. 



f. 



It 



ff 



.» 



I. 



Rev., 273 
Theophflus, 127 
Gumey, Captain, 315 
Charles, 307 
Mrs. Charles, 315 
Francis H., 307, 
308,309,310,313,314, 

3«6. 318. 319. 3»o. 32*. 
3aa. 323. 324. 396 
Gumey, Gerard H., 367, 

368,371.374.376.380, 

383, 387. 390 
Gumey, J. N., 366 
Mrs., 315 
Quinton E., 367, 

368, 371. 374. 376. 379. 

382. 387. 390 
Gumey, Reginald, 16 
Gutteridge, Edward, 57 
Gwyne, Colonel, 21, 25 

Haakon VH., King of 
Norway, 381, 382,384, 

385. 386. 389. 39 « 
Haggard, William R., 296 
Hague, Thomas, 81 
Haulane, Mr., 391 
Haldinstein, A., 345, 347 

„ H., 340 

Hales, H. C, 341 



Hall, Captain C, 346 

„ John, 180 

„ Rev. Mr., 262 

„ Sergeant-Major, 69 

H T., 81 
Hamilton, General Ian, 

356. 372 
Hamilton, John Potter, 

i6a, 172, 178 
Hamond, Mr. (Westacre), 

251 
Hamond, Mr. and Misses, 

273 
Hamond, Philip, 201, 204, 

207,218,222, 396 
Hammond, Thomas, 224 
Hanbury, Hon. C. M. S. 

Bateman, 367. 371.374. 

376, 37?. 382, 387. 390 
Hanks, Wuliam, jun., 77 
Hansell, E. M., 374 
Harbord, Lady Caroline, 

52 
Harbord, Sir Harbord, 24 

„ Hon. Harbord, 

309. 310 
Harbord, Hon. W. Asshe- 
ton, 38, 52, 59, 65, 69, 
81, 8a, 97, 103, 104, 

127. 395 
Hardingham, — , 157 

Hardy, George, 148 

Hare, Frederick, 177 

Sir G. R. L., 332 

James, 57, 60, 74, 86, 

100, 107, III 

Hare, Mr., 199 

„ Thomas, 42, 43, 64, 

67, 74, 86, 100, 107, 

III, 396 

Harfer, WilUam, 61 

Harker, W., 376, 380 

Harmer, Hy., 163, 173, 179 

Harper, William, 227 

Harris, Colonel Lord, 335 

Harsant, Martin, 150 

Hart, General, 356 

Harvey, Charles, 127 

„ George, 204, 208, 

216, 220, 224, 227, 231 1 

240 

Harvey, John, 77, 79, 87, 

89, loi, 108, 112, 114, 

115, 125,126, 127, 130, 

131, 132, 135, 136, 137, 

143, 145, 148, 153, 158, 

164. 173, 174, 175, 178, 

179, 194, 204, 208, 209, 

210, 215, 216, 217,220, 

221, 224, 226, 228, 229t 



.1 



Harvey, John, continued— 
230, 231, 236, 238, 240, 
241, 242, 243, 245, 247, 

273. 396 
Harvey, Lieut-Col. J. R., 

99. 332, 333. 336, 337. 
338, 339. 342. 345. 346. 
349. 352, 353. 355. 357. 
359. 360, 362, 366, 367, 

368, 369. 370, 373. 376. 

379 
Harvey, Mrs. J. Robt., 344, 

363 
Harvey, Colonel R., 132 

„ Robert, sen., 127 

„ Robert, jun., 77, 

79, 83. 127, \\i 
Harvey, Mrs. Robert, 80 
„ Robert John, 164, 

396 
Harvey, Gen. Sir Robert 

and Lady, 373 
Harvey, R. J. H., 314, 318, 

323 
Harvey, Roger K., 225, 227, 

231,2^0 
Harvey Thomas, 172, 178, 

204, 207, 219 223, 226 
Harvey and Hudson, 77 
Harper, William, 57 
Hastings, A. C. 341, 361 

„ Lord, 301 

,. Lord A. F. D., 

390 
Hatton, Robert, jun., 198 
Havers, Thomas, 268 
Hawkesbury, Lord, 159 
Hayes, Roger, 79, 83, loi, 

108, 149, 163, 164, 172, 

173. 175. 178. 179. 205, 
208, 210, 215, 220, 224, 

397 
Head, John, 42 

Heal, f. H., 339, 361 

„ Quarter- Master, 345 

Heath, J., i^o 

„ Philip, 87, loi, 

107, III, 150 

Heath, Robert, 149 

„ William, 74, 86, 100, 

107,111, 149, 163,173, 

175. 178. 179 
Heaviside, Lieut, 317 
Hebgin, Mr., 261 
Hedley, Rev., 273 
Hellenes, Kin^ and Queen 

of, 381 
Helmsworth Mr. and Mrs., 

273 
Henniker, Sir Augustus, 268 



Index. 



409 



»» 
If 
»f 
>» 
I* 



Henniker, Lord, ^68 
Herbert, Lord, 310 
Herring, J. G., 180 

„ James, 57, 61 

„ John, 98 
Hersball, 389 
Heseltine, C. H., 350 

„ G., 350 
HiU, Charles W., wj 
Hill, Col Garerd, 362 
Harrison, 377 

i.D.H.,256,a57.«88 
Ir., 61, J18 

Rioh. Cokelvy, 38 

WilUani Money, 57, 

58, 60, loz, 108, 112, 

161, 171, 177, 397 
Hilton, J., 81 
Hixide, Miss, 348 
Hoare, Sir S., 345, 346, 566 
Hoare, G. E., 376 
>. V. R., 339 
Hobart, John (Baron 

Hobart), 17 
Hobart, Lord, 109, 1x3, 114 
Hodge, Capt.andMrs.,273 
Hogg, George, xox, to8, 11 1 
HoUey, John, 87, xoo, 107, 

III, 150, 163, 17a, 178, 

397 
HoUey, Mr. and Mrs., 297 

Holtham, Sergeant, 93 

Hooper, William, 61 

Hope, Robert, 149 

Hopson, Captain, 153 

Hore, General, 356 

Hoste, Derrick, 262 

„ Rev.Dizon,3i,i86, 

249 
Hoste, William, 115, x6i, 

X71, X77 
Houghton, William, 61 
Hovey, P., 342 
Howard, Dennis, 57, 60 
„ Sir George, 44 
„ William, 151 
Howe, A. E., 339 
Lord, 24i 63 
Quarter-Master, 69 
Sir William, 44 
Howes, J., 236 

„ R. (M.P.), 318 
Howlett, Tobn, 150 

„ Mr., 26x 
Howorth James, 69, 81 
Hudsoo,Antbony, 148, 164, 

173. 175. X79» 194. 198, 
204, 208, 215, 2x6, 2x7, 

220, 224, 226, a3X» 240 



ti 



f> 



Hudson, Lady Anne, 125 
Hughes, — , R.N., 340 
Hulton, James, 38 
Humbeit, General, 88 
Hum£rey, John, 210 
Humphrey, Bloom, 41 
„ John, 4X 
„ Rev. John, 127 
Hunter, Captain, 280 

„ H. D., 340, 361 
Hussey, Edward, 148 
Huxley, W. S.» 34i» S^x 
Hyde, John, 65, 74, 87, 100, 
X07, XXI, 1x5, xa7, X30, 
145, 149, X53, 1O2, 172, 
X77, 178 

Ikin, John, X48, X75 
Ingle, G. W., 341, 361 
Ingram, Thomas, 1 50 
Irby, Captain Hon., 233, 

2361 «37 
Isham, Mr. and Mrs., 273 

Iveagh, Lord, 344, 366 

Ives, Capt. 4Qd Mrs., 297 

„ Ferdinand, 266, 271, 

272, 274, 275, 276, 277f 

279, 281, 282, 283, 285, 

286 
Ives, John, 77, 79f 80, 87, 

xox, 108, 112 
Ives, T. R., 274 
„ Miss, 273 

Jackson, Rev. H., 291 
„ John, 236 
„ Mrs., 288 
„ Thomas, xoo, X07 

X6l, X7I 

jAggs, M. W., 341, 561 
Jarrett, William, 57 

„ William, jun., 60 
lands, F. W., 333» 34« 
Jary, Jacob, 283, 284, 285 

„ William, 163, 173, 

X75» i79» «04» «o8, 2x6, 
220, 224, 226, 231,240, 

397 
Jay, Thomas, X51 

Jenery, Charles, 162 

Jenkinson, Mr., 20 

Jemingham, Edward, 59 

„ George, 37 

Jervis, Sir John, 75 

Jewell, Captain, 24 

Jewson, G., 362 

»« -^» 4^ 
Jodrell, Mr., 39, 67 

Johnson, Frederic, 16 

„ Mr., 233 



Johnson R. A., 350 

„ Capt. Richard, 

130, X45. X5«» 162, X7X, 
Johnson, Robert, 4X [177 

„ Samuel, 205 
William, C, 83 
Johnston, E. A. T., 374, 

l'fi^ 379, 38a, 387 
Johnston, General, 67 

lolly, C, B., 342, 361 

Jonas, P., 339 

Jones, Mr. Jame$| 25, 26, 

37, 31, 46, 49i 50, 51, 

57» ^ 6« 
Jcmes, James, Jan., 37, 60 

„ Paul, 19 

Kay, R., 340 
Keer, Manning, 208 
Keith-Morgan, Capt, 315 
Kellett-Long, J. B., 340 
Kemble, William, 31 
Kemp, Rev. E., 288 

„ Rev. Sir W„ 268 
Kendall, Samuel, 149 
Kendle, Thomas, 151 
Kennedy, Lieut.-Coionel, 

280^ 281 
Kenny, John, 57, 6x 
Kent, H. A., 342 

„ Mr. Nathaniel, 95 
Kenyon-Stow, Rev. L. D., 

333 
Keppel, Admiral, 19, 24 

„ Rev. A. and Mrs., 

297 

Keppel, B. W. A., 368, 371, 

373. 376. 379, 38a, 387, 

390 
Keppel, Colonel, 153 

„ Colonel Edwd., 362 

„ Lieut.-Col. F., i6x 

„ Hon. and Rev. T., 

3<» 

Kerrich, Thomas, X27 

Kerrison, Sir ^wai^, 16, 

267, 268, 397 
Kerrison, John, 149, 164, 

173, 175, 179 
Kerrison, Mrs., 344 

„ R. O., 333, 337, 

338, 34 1 1 343, 344, 345, 

„ 346, 353; 359. 360, 377 

Kerrison (Sir), Roger, 40, 

51, 60, 77, X27, 130, 

133, 331, 340 
Kerrison, Thomas Alday, 
65. 74. 87, lOI, X06, 
X08, 1X2, X27, 150, 163, 

173, 175, »79. 398 

2 D 



4IO 



Index. 



Kett, George, 236 
Key, Colonel, 211 
Kiddle, R., 147 
Kidman, Mr., 363 

„ S. H., 340, 355, 
361 
King, H.M. The, 365, 368, 

37«. 373. 375. 381, 382. 
384. 385. 386, 388, 389, 

391 
King, Samuel, 149, 162, 

172, 178 

Kirbell, James, 149 

„ Robt., 207 

Kisbee, Lieut, R.N., 281 

Kitchener, Lord, 351, 352, 

356 
Kittle, -, 57 

Kittmer, B., 210 

Kitton, Mr., 261 

KnatchbuU, Mr. and Mrs., 

273 
Knight, G. B. L., 282, 283, 

285, 286, 287, 288, 290, 

«9i. 297, 398 
Knightly, Mr., 273 
Knox, Lt.-Col., 320, 321 
„ General, 353 

Lacey, Mr., 287 
Lacon, Edmund (after- 
wards Knt. and Bart.), 

33 
Lacon, Edmund K., 130, 

135, 145, 164, 174, 176, 

179. 183, 204, 205, 208, 

216, 221, 224, 227,229, 

232, 240, 241, 242, 244, 

398 
Lacon, Mr. and Mrs. Mort- 

lock, 281 
Lacon, Mrs. Stirling, 281 
Lambert, Ladv, 315 
Lancaster, John, 161, 171, 

180 
Lane, Henry, ai 
Langman, William, 57, 61 
Lansdowne, Marquis of, 

337. 238 
Large, John, 57, 61, 62 

Last, William, 151 

Laton Charles, 59, 74, 80, 
87, loi, 108, 112, 115, 
127, 130, 134, 135, 145, 
148, 154, 158, 163, 164, 
172, 173, 175, 178, 179, 
204, 208 

Laud, A. T., 339, 361 

Laws, John, 205 

Lawson, Col. W., 359, 360 



Lay, Charles, 76, 83 

Leath, John, 149 

Lee, James, 162, 172, 178, 

204, 207, 219, 223, 226 
Lee, William, 100, 107, 11 1, 

162, 172, 178, 199, 200, 

201, 204, 207, 219, 223, 

226 
Leeder, Captain, 152, 154 
Leeder, Charles, 83 
Leeds, Duchess of, 125 
Lees, George, 81 

„ Thomas, 81 
L'Estrange, Captain, 316, 

317. 322 
Ley, J., 116 

Letroy, Dean, 345, 362 

Leicester, Earl & Countess 

of, 299, 300. 303, 304t 
305 
Leicester, Earl of, 313, 

343, 365. 366, 367, 394 
Leicester, Countess of, 15, 

367, 368 

Lemner, —, 358, 360 

Lemmon, Mr., 199 

Lennard, T. Barrett, 95 

Lever, James, 61, 62 

Levita. H. P., 333 

Liddeli, Captain, 322 

Liddlelow, William, 150 

Liebenburg, — , 355 

Lister, F., 340, 361 
„ John, 204, 207,219, 
223, 226 

Little, General, 356 

Liver, James, 57 

Loch, Captain Lord, 358 

Loftus, Charles, 218, 222, 
225, 230, 239, 245, 248, 
253, 256, 257, 258, 259i 
a6i, 263, 264, 265,266, 
269, 271, 27a, 273, 274, 
275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 
280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 
285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 
292, 293, 294, 295. 296, 
298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 

303. 304, 305, 306, 398 
Loftus, Colonel, 37 

Frederick, 254, 255, 
256, 257, 258, 259, 262, 
263, 265 
Loftus, Capt. and Mrs. F., 

273 
Loftus, Major, 158 

Major and Mrs., 



.» 



19 



281 

Loftus, Major-General, 98 
„ General, 133 



Loftus, William, 42 
Lloyd, John, 100, 107, 109, 
III, 150, 161, 171, 180, 
202, 205 
Long, G. H., 339, 361 
„ John, 205 
„ J. B. Kellett, 340 
Longford, J., 81 
Lonsdale, Col., Earl of, 

335 
Louis XVIIL, 191 

Low, A. A., 340, 361 

„ Frederick, 337 

„ Henry, 362 
Lowden John, 150 

„ Mr. 185, 186 
Lucas, Colonel, A. G., 326, 

332. 333. 334. 335. 33^, 

342, 349. 362 
Lucas, W. G., 333 
Lukin, Captain, 39 
Lynedoch, Lord, 124 

Macadam, T., 168 
Mahon, Colonel, 351 
Maillard, Pamell R., 277, 

279, 280, 282, 285, 286, 

288, 290, 291, 293 
Maillard, Captain & Mrs., 

281 
Manby, George WiUiam, 

65, 74. 86, 399 
Manby, Matthew Pepper, 

128, 129 
Manders, Dr., ^50 
Maners, Samuel, 150 
Mann, Mr., 211 
Manning, Mr. (Eye), 259 
Mansfield, Lord, 29 
Mantle, T., 339, 361 
Marcon, John, 20ui, 207, 219 
Marryatt, Captain, R.N., 

301 
Marryatt, Frank, 302, 304, 

399,, 
Marshall, F. H., 342 

„ Richard, 171, 180 

Marram, Major, 318 

„ Mr. Stratton, 

273 
Martin, Mr., 200 

Mason, Colonel, 273, 289 

„ Mr., 44, 47, 58, 59 

„ William, 52, 53, 57. 

59.65.87,101,108,112, 

147 
Mason, William, jun., 127 

Massey, Colonel, 316, 318 

Matchett, Lieutenant, 317 

Mathew, William, 38 



Index. 



411 



Mathews, William, 82, 104 
Mathias, James V., 83 
Mayes, Richard, 57, 61 
Mayo, Richard, 62 
Maxwell, Colonel, 132 
Melbourne, Lord, 247 
Meliish, Rev. Edward, 127 
Mendham, W. L., 323 
Methuen, Lord, 355, 356, 

357, 358. 359, 360, 361, 

380, 384, 388 
Metzner, General F., 134, 

153. 154, 161 
Mickleburgh, Captam, 109 
Micklethwaite, Adjutant, 

32a 

Micklethwait, Captain, 115 

Micklethwaite, John, 148 
Middleton, Major, 315, 316 
Millard, G. K., 340, 361 
„ William S., 231, 
240, 400 
Miller and Co., 344 
Milles, Hon. G. J., 153, 230, 
339, 248, 250, 251, 352, 
253, 255, 256, 257, 258, 
400 {see also Sondes, 

Lords 
Milner, General, 127, 131, 

132, 133, 135, 13^ 151, 
Mills, Mr. F., 235 [156 

„ H. P.. 341 
Mines, William, 268 
Mingay, Mr., 40 
Mitchell, Samuel, 148, 164, 

173, 175. 179, 204, 208, 

216, 220, 225, 227 
Moira, Lord, 124 
Molyneux, Col. the Hon. 

William, 278 
Money, Major-Gen. John, 

64, 83, 102, 126, 127, 

132, 136, i37» 143, 154, 
156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 
163, 167, 172, 174, 175, 
178, 183, 400 
Money, C. B., 400 

„ Charles, 57, 61, 

H7 
Money, Richard, 207, 226 

Mordaunt, Charles, 100 
Moreau, — , 73 
Moore, — , 42 

„ John, 268 
Morse, A. F., 367, 368, 371, 
373» 376, 379, 382, 387, 

390 
Morse, B., 127 

„ Edward, 148, 173, 

175, 179 



Morse, G. H., 345, 363 

Morris, H. B., 342 
„ Mr., 187, 188 
„ Miss, 298 

Morrison, J., 81 

Moseley, Mr., 200 

Mott, J. T., 266, 271, 272, 
274, 275, 276, 277, 279, 
281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 
287, 288, 290, 291, 292, 

293 
Mott, Capt. and Mrs., 273, 

281 
Motts, Sergeant, 211 
Mannings, Thomas, 107, 

III, 149, 162 
Munnings, Rev. T. C, 80 
Murphy, Mr., 31 
Murray, James, 48, 64, 74, 

87, loi. 107, III, 150, 

162, 172, 177, 178, 204, 

401 
Murrill, James, 202 
Muttimer, Lt.-Col., 154 
Myhill, F. W., 340 

Neal, Israel, 150 
Nelson, Admiral, 97, 109 

„ M., 41 

„ R., 236 

„ Rev., 273 

„ Thomas, 149, 162, 
401 
Neve, Thomas, 223 
Newell, Thomas, 57, 60 
Newson, W. A., 341 
Nice, J. H., 339 
Nichols, W. P., 323 
Nicholson, James, 150 
Nisbett, Jeremiah, 81 (or 
Jeremiah Nisbett 

Browne), 105 
Noll, Jacob, 41 
Nooth, C, 340, 361 
Norgate & Son, 319 
Norman, John, 42 

„ Nicholas, 57, 61 
N orris, Mr., 273, 301 
Northbrook, Lord, 351 
Norton, Francis, 41 

tohn, 150 
Ir., 281, 287 
Noverre, Mr., 314, 315,316 
Norway, King of, 381, 382, 
384, 385, 386, 389, 391 
Nunn, O. S., 339 
Nurse, Mr., 261 

Oakes, Colonel, 295 
„ John, 161, 171, 177 



it 



„ 



Oakes, William, 205, 218, 

222, 225 

O'Brien, Colonel, 375 
Oldershaw, Rev. John, 127, 

268 
Oliver, S. M., 339 
O'Malley, O. F., 323 
Opie, John, 09 
Ord, Colonel J. T., 326 
Orford, Lord, 22, 23, 24, 

27, 28,. 32 
Osbaston, Thomas, 57, 61, 

62 
Overman, H. J., 370, 374, 

376, 380, 383, 387, 390 
Overton, John, 41 

Overton, Richard, 57, 61 

Packe, Col. and Mrs., 273 
Paddon, Rev. and Mrs., 

273 
Page, John, 205, 208, 211 

Paget, General, 354 

Palgrave, William, loi, 

108, 112,115, 150, 164, 

401 
Palmer, Mr., 211 

„ Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles, 281 
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. 

G. D., 281 
Palmer, S. T., 280 

„ William, 149 
Paifrement, John, 41 
Parkes, Mr., 292 
Parmeter, Lieut., 317, 322 
Parry, Edward, 52, 53, 58, 

63, 64, 87, lOI 
Parson, £., 188 
Parsons, Benjamin, 216, 

220 
Parsons, S., 164 

„ W., jun., 211 
Partridge, Champion, 266 

„ Rev. J., 297 

,. Thomas, 150, 

204, 207, 219, 223, 226, 

231, 239 
Patteson, Col., 131, 132, 

158, 159 

Patteson, John, 77, 79, 88, 
117, 126, 197 

Patteson, Major, 322 
„ Mrs. H. S., 315 
„ J. S., 230, 236 

Patterson, J. H., 367, 370 

Pattle, D. M., 81 

Paul, Mr. and Mrs. Daw- 
son, 362, 363 

Pearson, Rev. Mr., 69 



413 



Index. 



PeUuuii« Mn, 55 

Philo & Son, 345 

Phipps, Captiiin, 197 

Pickeriog, G., 340 

Pike, JohD, 162, 171 

Pilch, 375 

Pillans, W. C, 157, 158, 

159. 1^3* 173. 179 
Pitcbor, James, 41 

Pitt, Mr., ao, 36, 91 

PlatteD, Thomas, 57, 61, 

147 
Plestow, Thomas Berners, 

65, 74, 36 

Plummer, J.» 8x 

Plumtre, Robert, 137, 3x0 

Poll, Isbroael, 336 

Pollock, Mr., 38 

Pond, S., 339. 361 
Portland, Duke of, 53, 54, 

58,99 
Potter, Mr., 36, 31 

Power, O. Bm ^i 

Pratt, Edward, 137, 199, 

307 
Pratt, Edward R., 318 
Preston, Mr. and Mrs. 

Edmund, 381 
Preston, Mr. and Mrs. 

E. H. L., 381 
Preston, Rev. Geoiige, 137, 

Preston, Isaac, jun., 224, 

337, 333, 340 
Priest, Rev. St. John, 66 
Prime, F., 339 
Prior, B. H. Leathes, 345, 

36a. 377 
Pritty, James, 41 

Probyn, D. M., 375, 383, 

388 

Proctor, Tbos. Beaachamp, 

„«93»«94*«9ft 
Pollen, Capt and Mrs,, 381 
Pulteney, Sir James. 167 
Purdjr, Mr., 339 
Purku, A. L., 339, 361 

Rackham, William, 309, 

3 10 
Raddiffe, Sergeant J., 69, 

81 
Ramsey, Colonel, 377 
Ransome, Mr, and Mrs., 

397 
Rathbone, John, 57, 61, 63 

Raven, Dr., 349 
„ Money, 57, 60 
„ Nicholas John, 83, 
108, 113,147. i6i»»7i. 
177 



Rayner, William, 330, 334 
Read, Robert, 149 
Reader, George, 41 
Readwin, Henry, 57, 61 

„ William, 61 
Redhead, Benjamin, 148, 

164. 176 
Reeve, G., ^40 

„ Stephen, 150 
Rendlesham, Lord, 336 
Rennett, Samuel, 30, 31 
Renny, John, 6z 
Revel, Vet.- Surgeon, 350 
Reynolds, Charles, 77, ^3 
Reynolds, Mr., 58 
Rice, Mr. Spring, 337 
Richard, John, 57, 61 
Richards, Sir Richard. 313 
„ Robert, 3x6, 330, 
335, 237, 231, 340 
Richards, Westley, 308 
Riches, Francis, 148, 304, 
308 
„ George, 393 
Riches, John, 149 
Rickards, C. B., 343 
Riddell, Captahi, 332 
Riggs, W., 341, 361 
Rishton, Martin F., loi, 

108, III 
Roach, J., 81 

Robberds, J. W., 192, 23^ 
Roberts, Lord, 355, 358 
Robertson, Qrt.- Master, 

59 
Rodney, Admiral, 31 

Rod well, C. H., 339 

Roe, Mr., 321 

Rogers, J., 341 

Rogerson, Thomas, 162 

RoTfe, Edmund, 97, loi, 

108, HI, 161, 171 

Rooks, John, 77 

Rope, C. G., 330, 324 

Roper, John, 368 

„ }^^ jun., 368 

„ Thomas, 305 

Rose, Mr^ s8 

„ Thomas, 315, 319, 

323, 236 

Rudall, Samuel, 171, 180 

Rudge, Edward, 57, 60, 

218, 222, 225, 256, 257 

Rump, Hugh, 300 

Rundle, General, 353 

Rushbrooke, Mr., 373 

Russell, Sir Baker, 350 

„ Lord John, 260 

„ Sir W., 318 

Rust, Michael, 3i8| 322 



Ratledge, Major, 338, 339 
Ruxby, Thomas, 151 
Rye, Walter, z6 

Saffery, Edmund, 74, 86, 

100, 107, III, 199 
St. Aubyn, Lieut., 317 
St. Quinton, Mr., 381, 283, 

388, 293 
Salmon, Rev. B. W., 90 
Sandiford, W. R., 256, 

357, «58» 259, a63, 265, 

366 
Saul, Thomas, 149, 304, 

308 
Savage, William, 57, 61 
Savory, Coulsey, 162, 171 
„ F.,61 
„ John, 57, 60 
„ Thomas, 57 
Say, William, 199, 205, 207, 

218, 222, 335, 230, 239 
Sayer, James, 163 

„ Saml., Ill, 161, 171 
Scheureman, H. R., 340, 

361 
Scott, Daniel, B., 148, 164, 

173. 175, 179. 2*4 
Scott, Joseph, 256, 257, 

258* 259 
Seaman, R., 309, 318 

Seeds, — , 42 

Sceley, J. B., 350 

Seely, W. E., 340, 361 

Senkler, Charles, 41, 57 

Sepping, Mr., 398 

Seppiogs, Thomas, 57, 61 

Seppings, Thomas, jun., 

57»6i 

Seppings, William, 57, 61 

Settle, — , 358, 

Seymour, C. D., 366, 367, 

368, 371. 372f 373. 3 A 
379i 382. 385» 386, 387, 

390 
Shaw, C. L., 341, 361 

Shearing, John, 57, 60 

„ Mr. M., 44, 48, 

52* 54t 59 
Shelboume, Lord, 21 
Shepherd, Col., 345 
Sheppard, R. H., 198 
Sherife, Robert, 268 
Shillitoe, Alderman T., 

361 
Showell, H., 343, 355 
Sibell, John, 74, 86, 100, 

107,111, 149, 163,173, 

175* 179 , 
Sibthorpe, Col., 69 



Index. 



4'3 



SMdotis, Mrft., ay 
Sidmoutb, Lord, 165, 184, 

185* X93» i95i I98« aoi 
Simpson, Mr*, 333 
Siogh, Prince F. Dnleep, 

33«. 333. 337.36a. 366. 
307. 368, 371, 373. 37^ 

379. 38«i 387. 390 
Sinkler, Charles, 41, 57 

Sippings, F., 150 

Sitwell, Col., 353 

Skidmore, Mn, 1x0 

Sky, Major, 131 

Slade, Majot, 315 

Slater, H. J., 339, 361 

Sloane- Stanley, C. V*, 390 

Smee, £. N., 340, 361 

Smith, Captain, 65, 69, 70, 

31S 
Smith, Captain and Mrs., 

a6x 

Smith, Lieut.*CoL, 997, 

*98. 301. 303 
Smith, Lieut., 362 

Mr., 295,3x9,331 
Rev. Mr., ixo 
Col. Eric, 357 
F., 340, 361 
Francis, 57, 61 
John, 38, 8a, X04 
John (Sorgeooi), 

157 
Smith, Sir Sidney, 109 

Suxgeon, 3x5 

Thomas, X49 

William, X5X, 323 

„ W. G., 34a 

Smith-Dorrien, Genl., 355 

Sm3rth, John, 63, 87, loi, 

X08, xxa, XX5, 130, X31, 

X32, 1^5, X50, xsa, 153 

Smyth, Ueut.-Col. John, 

158.163. X7». 173.175. 
178, 179 

Sm^th, Mrs., 153, 154 

Sneid, George, 107, xix 

SneU, Charles, 41 

Soman, A. E., 345 

Somerset, Col., 346, 353 

Socnmons, Mr., 314 

Sondes, Right Hon* Lord, 
a59, a6a, 863, 964, 265, 
266, 269, 370, a7x, 27a, 
400 (St$ also Millts^ 
G.J,) 

Sondes, Lord and Lady, 

373 
Soult. Marshal, X85 

8oweU& W. C, 341, 36X 

Spain, King and Qiiwen of, 

388 



.1 
.1 

.t 



.. 



.. 



.1 






Spalding, Daniel, X49 
Spelman, William, ao4, 

305, 208 
Spencer, Col., X7 
Springfield, O., 3x8 
Spurrell, E. D., 366, 367, 

368. 371. 374. 376 
Squire, Richard D., 204, 

ao8, 2it, aao 
Squires, Charlotte, 236 
Stacpole, Colonel, 35 x 
Stagr, 1., 337 
Stanora, Lord and Lady, 

3aa 
Stangroom, Christopher, 

57.60 
Stannard, Joseph, jun., 77 
Steadman, E., X47 
Stedmaii, Edmund, 57, 60 

„ Mr., 6x 
Stevens, L. W*i X62, X71, 

177 
Steward, C, 340, 355 

„ Timothy, jun., 

ao8 

Stewardson, Charles, X47 

„ Corporal, 284 

Steyn, President, 356 

Stibbardf John, 57, 61, 2x8, 

222 

Stimson, William, 291 

Stistead, Lt.-Col., 258 

Stoddart, John, 77 

Stokes, Mr., 51,61 

^ William, 57, 60 

Stoughton, Mr., 287 

„ Mrs., 288 

Stow, Rev* L. D. Kenyon-, 

333 
Stracey, Capt. and Mrs., 

288 

Stracey, Lady, 3x5 

„ Lieut., 3x5, 317 

„ Lt.-CoL, 295 

Stringer, Thomas, 57, 62 

Stuart, Sir S. H. L., 333, 

34a 

Styleman, Henry, 41, 100, 

107, XXX 

Styleman, Mr., 47, 48 
Suffield, Lord, 52, X04, X98, 

109, 200, 20X 
Suffleld, Lady, 5a 
Sultaar,J.. 318 
Sorteas, J., aio, an 
Suttell, — , 4a 
Sutterby, W., 340 
Swan, John, 148 
Sydney, Lord, a8 
Syer, Edward, a68 



Symonds, Edward. 41, 57 

Tallant, Mr., X56 
Tatham, Mr., 377 
Tavret, — , 42 
Taylor, Francis, 6x, 62 
„ Sergt. J., 81, 93 
„ Joseph, 100, 107, 

XXI, 1x5, X30, 156,145, 

150, x6i, 171, 180,202, 

205 
Taylor, William, 164, 174, 

x;6, X79 
Tebbit, S., 339 
Tennant, J. G., x6 
Tetlow, J., 8x 
Thomas, Lieut., R.N., 301 

„ W. Sherwin, 39. 

82, X04 
Thome, John, 74, 83, 87, 

xoo 
Thorp, John, X48, 162 
Thorpe, W. R., 339, 361 
Thomlinson, John, 82, 104 
„ The Misses, 

«73 
Tickel, Parson, X47 

TiUett, J. H., 318 

Tipple, G., 236 

Tilney, Mr., 261 

Toke, Captain, 32a 

„ John, 39 

Tollmache, Mr., 273 

Tollemache, Hon. D. A., 

333. 337 
Tolver, Samuel, 174, 176, 

X79 
Tombleson, Joseph, 219, 

333 
Tomlinson, John, 39 
Tompson, Charles, X64, 

173. X75. 79. 194. 403 
Tompson, Edward, X73, 

175. X79 
Tompson, Messrs., 233 

Tonvn, Lieut.-General, 80 

Tooley, Mr., xxo 

Townshend, Hon. Charles, 

33.39 
Townshend, Lord Charles 

V. F., 307, 248, 350, 
353, 356, 357, 358, 259, 
363, 365 
Townshend, George, Visct. 
& Marquis, 17, 30, 32, 
23. 34. 35, 36, 37, 38, 
29. 31. 32. 34. 37. 39. 
40, 43. 44. 45* 48. 49. 
5i» 52. 57. 58, 59. 62. 
64, ^ 67, 73, 74, 84, 



414 



Index. 



Townshend, George Visct., 
continued— 
87, 88, 89, 95, loi, 108, 

112, 115, 127, 128, 129, 

130, 132, 133, 136, 143, 

144. 145. i47» 153. i55» 
161, 170. 174, I77»2i3, 

248, ^75, 401 
Townshend, Lady, 23, 25, 

27, 28, 44, 46, 48, 54, 

58, 65, 253 
Townshend, Lord James, 

212, 214, 217, 218,222, 

225, 228, 230, 237, 245, 

256 
Townshend, Hon. John, 23 
Travers, Captain, 351 
Tremlett, Captain, 157 
Treves, F., 333 
Troubridge, Sir Thos., 308 
Tuck, C. E., 323 
„ HusUer, 337 
„ Thomas, 216, 220, 

224, 226, 402 
Turner, Rev. C., 318, 319 

„ Mr., 275 
Tuttell, Samuel, 252, 264 
Tyssen, Samuel, 204, 207 
Tyssen-Amherst, W. A., 

322 

Upjohn, Rev., 301 
Utting, Christopher, 149 
„ Thomas, 204, 208, 
216, 220, 224, 227 

Valentia, Col. Viscount, 

335 
Varlo, John, 38, 69, 82, 104 

Vincent, James, 150 

M W., 340, 361 

Von Tempsky, Lieut.-Col., 

193 
Vitty, William, 41 

Vyse, Colonel, 33 

Wainwright, S., 345 
Wales, T.R.H., Pnnce and 

Princess of, 322 
Wales, Mr., 199 
Walford, F. L., 342 

„ H. H., 342 
Walker, George, 57, 59, 

62 
Waller, — , 253 

„ T. M., 57 
Walpole, — , 63 

„ Hon. F., 314, 318 
Walsingham, Lord, 39 
Ward, John, 57, 61, lox, 

X08, III 



Ward, Joshua, 215 

„ Robert, 57, 60, 161, 

171 
Wardale, Thomas, 41 

Warner, W. Lee, 251, 252, 

273, 288 

Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Lee, 

273. 288 
Wames, Captain, 322 
Waters, Mark, 174, 176, 

179 
Waters, Samuel, 224 
Watson, Richard, 77, 149 

t, T., 150 

„ T. C, 150, 204, 

207, 215, 219. 223, 226 
Webb, Thomas, 57, 60, 207 

„ William, 30 
Webster, J. S., 149, 162 
Wellesley, Sir A., 180 
Wellington, Duke of, 185, 

192 
WeUs, Mr., 16 
„ John, 219, 223 
„ N. R., 339 
Westley and Richards, 

292, 308 
Weston, Charles, 77 
Whitaker, John, 38 
White, Mr., 287 

„ Charles, 57, 61 
„ John, 39 
„ Messrs. T., 372 
Whitfield, G. S., 333 
Whitehand and Goodram, 

Messrs., 232, 236 
Whiteman, John, 57, 61, 

207, 218, 222, 225, 230, 

239* 
Whitmore, F. W., 341 

Whittington, Jacob, loi, 

108, 112 

Whitty, Samuel, 41 

Whitworth, Lord, 118 

Whyte, Lieut-Col., 294, 

295 
Wigg. J. S., 148, 164, 173, 

179 

Wighton, John, 81 

Wild, E., 362 

Willett, E.,318 
„ H., 318, 345 
„ and Oxley, 229, 247 

WilUam IV.. King, 246 

WUUam, Fredk., H.R.H., 

79 
Williams, Peter E., 204, 

207, 226 

Williams, Thomas, 31 

Willis. G. C, 341 



Wilson, Sir Archdale, 314 
„ George St V., 268 
M J« M., 342 
„ Robert, 114, 163, 

172, 178, 204, 207, 219, 

223, 226, 230, 231, 239 
Wilson, W., 342 
Winchilsea, Lord, 269 
Windham, — , 63 

„ Mr. 39, 53, 54, 

176 
Windham, the Right Hon. 

William, 39, 99 
Windham, W. H., 297 
Windowe, Captain, 216 
Winter, J. J., 313 

.> R., 147 

„ Sergeant, 315 

Wiseman, Thomas, 218, 

222, 225, 230, 239 
Withers, Robert, 148 
Wodehouse, — , 63 

„ Hon. Edward 
and Mrs., 297 
Wodehouse, Edmund, 149 
162, 204, 207, 217,219, 

223, 226 
Wodehouse, Henry, 224, 

227 
Wodehouse, John, 217, 

247 
Wodehouse, Lady, 152, 

273 
Wodehouse, Lord, 127, 

247, 248, 260, 271, 272, 

273f 285, 286, 289, 

295 
Wodehouse, Lord John, 

296, 299, 302, 304 
Wodehouse, the Misses, 

273 
Wodehouse, Hon. Philip, 

219, 223, 226 
Wodehouse, Hon. W.. 130, 

145, 148, 152, 164, 173, 

176 
Wod^ouse, Hon. Mrs. W., 

273 
Wodehouse, Thomas, 40, 

65, 74, 87, 100, 107, 

III 

Wollaston, Rev. C. H.,288 

„ Rev. W., 288 

Wood, — , 264 

„ A. F., 339 

„ George, 292, 296, 

299, 301, 304 

Wood,- R. W., 340, 361 

„ William, 300, 301, 

304 



Index. 



415 



Woodcock, H., 318 
Woods, Timothy, 81 
Wooll, Hugh, 162, 172, 178 
Worth, Walter, 77 

„ Captain J., 268 
Wrench, Jeremiah, 60 

John, 57 
Wright, J., 229 

John, 201, 211 
Jonas, 57, 61, 62, 
232, 264, 280, 295, 298, 
300,303 
Wright, William, 41, 57, 61 






Wymer, George, 87, 100, 
107, rii, 150, 163,172, 
178,204,207,217,219, 
223,226,231,239 

Wymer, John Varlo, 219, 
223, 226, 231, 239 

Wyndham, W. G. Crole, 

377 
Wynne, A. S., 377 

Wynyard, Colonel, 98 

Yallop, J. H., 197, 234 
Yelloly, J. S., 339 



York, H.R.H. Duke of, 71, 
81, 83, 98, 99, 124, 137, 

327» 533. 349» 368 
Yorke, Right Hon. Chas., 

145. 15a 
Young, Denn, 274, 276, 277, 

279, 282, 283, 285, 288, 

«90. 293, 296, 299, 300, 

301, 302, 304 
Young, Mr., 336 
Younge, G. W., 26 
Youngs, H. R., 339 

„ Richard, 41 



yarrola &* Sotts, Limiiid, Priniirs^ Empirt Press^ Norwich and LTndon,